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The Mccanns were not lucky.

They locked up when they were away and couldn't see the unlocked part of 5A, same as us.  Simples

Leaving three toddlers alone for over an hour in a foreign resort was asking for trouble.  Aside from the abduction claim, there are many other dangers for children left alone.
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They thought that they were safe.  They thought that the front was secure and the group of friends could see the patio and patio entrance, which was illuminated from the street lamp immediately opposite 5A from only 50 metres away.



People make errors, John, same as you made an unknowing massive error in taking your babies into your bed if they cried.  However, you were very lucky and nothing untoward happened, thank goodness.
 
Me, I was aware and spent 7 years up and down literally all night long every night, because, altho I would have liked the ease of it and loved my babies in bed cuddled up to me, I wasn't prepared to take the risk of smothering my babies.

I was on the verge of a break down after 7 years of almost no sleep.


Like you, the Mccanns made an unknowing error.
But you were lucky; they were desperately unlucky.

They were mature people and trained doctors who, in my opinion, ignored the danger to their children. If they were unaware of the potential for a child to fall from the balcony, of the dangers in the home (knives, medicines), of the dangers of leaving small children alone I can't help wondering what they would class as dangerous.

I would never allow small children unsupervised access to that balcony; far more dangerous than hiring a baby-sitter or someone reading some note in a book in my opinion.
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Joe Public did not wander around 5A back garden; they had to open a gate to get in.  At the front too, just like in our front garden, they had to come in via a relatively narrow entrance on to what was very obviously a private area.

We lived on a main ring road and we left the side gate and the back door open, but in those days it felt very safe, when we were in the back garden.   I wouldn't risk it now, things have changed. 

PdL still feels safe, it is a relatively refined sort of place with old ladies and families wandering around.   You [and all of uis] know better now tho SIL, but would you agree that on the surface Luz feels very safe?
I would rate Luz as extremely safe, much safer than the UK.

However, we still take basic safety measures.  We security-lock our front door.  We don't leave our car open, or with a key in it.  We have a ring of family and friends we can telephone for rapid support.  We know how to summon the GNR and the bombeiros, and we know we have never had any language barrier.

Our 'new' home is already occupied by our children and grandchildren, one aged 6, another approaching 2.  There is a large patio in their part of the house which has the exact same type of balcony as 5A, and it has a 1 storey drop below (on to a hard surface).  This was deemed to be climbable, therefore not safe enough.  The builder was asked to alter it to make it secure.  The safety fence is 1.8m high.

Please don't get me wrong.  I am not saying Portugal (or Luz) is perfect.  I have just written on my blog the third instalment about the forest fire near Pedrógão Grande.  The good news is the fire is out.  The bad news is those evacuated are returning home to find thefts and burglaries.  There are jackals and vultures everywhere.
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The Mccanns were not lucky.

They locked up when they were away and couldn't see the unlocked part of 5A, same as us.  Simples

Their fault Sadie.

No one else's.

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This hearing on 7th September 2011 was reported ONLY in the Bath Chronicle. This is odd, as it marked the occasion when the Defence announced that the accused would supply an "enhanced statement" describing when Joanna was killed. how much force was used, and how her body came to end up in Longwood Lane. The link was:
http://www.bathchronicle.co.uk/Court-hear-Bath-engineer-killed-neighbour/story-13290060-detail/story.html
but, like so many other detailed reports of the case, it is no longer accessible. Sinister, eh?

Hmmm! Now that is interesting. Do we have a situation where Old Bill is calling the shots with the local rag? Is the Chron arse kissing after they've been leant on? Looks like they have something much bigger to hide.
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They thought that they were safe?  Then why bother to lock up during the day?  A massive fail imo.


The Mccanns were not lucky.

They locked up when they were away and couldn't see the unlocked part of 5A, same as us.  Simples
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Unlocking an entrance door with a key Sadie, will not wake up children.
I didn't make that comment Stephen

But I will tell you that when we went to bed, we tip toed up the carpeted stairs with no shoes on, we used the lavatory .... BUT WE NEVER FLUSHED THE LOO, or SPOKE and the moment that we started to go to sleep our little boy would start crying.

However he was a desperately poor sleeper and i doubt that the Mccann children would react as much as he did.

I can empathise with The Mccanns if they had a child who woke up all the time and i can understand not wanting to open a door which might have been very noisy.


Now if you weill excuse me.  Life has to go on in this part of The Midlands
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They thought that they were safe.  They thought that the front was secure and the group of friends could see the patio and patio entrance, which was illuminated from the street lamp immediately opposite 5A from only 50 metres away.

The Mccanns made an unknowing error.
;they were desperately unlucky.

They thought that they were safe?  Then why bother to lock up during the day?  A massive fail imo.

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Same as us.
If we went out, we locked our house.
If we were in the garden where we could see it, it was left unlocked, day or after dark.

My bet is that the Mccanns left the patio door closed but unlocked when they were in the tapas area able to keep an eye on it.  So convenient for snacks, drinks, the lavatory, towels, dry clothes, sun oil, etc.   But I dont know the exact situation, and neither do you.

You use keys Sadie, to lock and unlock.

It helps keeping your children safe.

In fact, it's just plain common sense.
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I could not see my children either, but I could hear them if they shouted or cried hard.

A mother is especially tuned into the cries of her own children

Not every mother. I didn't hear my baby's cries at night because I sleep very deeply. I slept through the smoke alarm a few weeks age. I used to have several alarm clocks to get me up for work. It's very embarrassing if you stay at a relative's and they have to come in and wake you when your baby cries. (My husband slept through it too). So like the 'instant overwhelming love' new mothers are supposed to feel, it's not universal. There are many variations.
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