Author Topic: The high speed return to Portimão police station incident.  (Read 3462 times)

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Offline Benice

The high speed return to Portimão police station incident.
« on: April 16, 2017, 06:40:56 PM »
The call for them to turn round and return immediately to the police station was less than 24 hrs after Madeleine's disappearance and obviously at that early time they would still be hoping to get a call to say that she had been found.   It's pretty obvious to me that the driver also believed momentous news was in the offing - hence his driving like a bat out of hell to get them back there ASAP.

Having built themselves up for whatever news they were going to hear -  when it turned out it was just to look at a photograph they were naturally completely devastated.   Their reaction was nothing to do with the speed of the car.    Anyone who can't understand that has no ability to put themselves in someone else's shoes IMO.


234
   
« Last Edit: April 19, 2017, 01:15:16 PM by John »
The notion that innocence prevails over guilt – when there is no evidence to the contrary – is what separates civilization from barbarism.    Unfortunately, there are remains of barbarism among us.    Until very recently, it headed the PJ in Portimão. I hope he was the last one.
                                               Henrique Monteiro, chief editor, Expresso, Portugal

Offline Faithlilly

Re: The high speed return to Portimão police station incident.
« Reply #1 on: April 16, 2017, 09:23:54 PM »
A police man trying to get a mother to the police station in case footage is of her missing daughter and a mother who leaves her three small children so vulnerable that one of them disappears. I know which one I'd view as more criminally culpable.
« Last Edit: April 19, 2017, 04:41:05 AM by John »
Moral Guilt
Detractors of the work of our British Police in bringing criminals to justice generally ignore the important distinction between moral proof and legal evidence of guilt. In not a few cases that are popularly classed with 'unsolved mysteries of crime,' the offender is known, but evidence is wanting. If, for example, in- a recent murder case of special notoriety and interest,* certain human remains had not been found in a cellar, a great crime would have been catalogued among `Police failures'; and yet, even without the evidence which sent themurderer to the gallows, the moral proof of his guilt would have been full and clear.
Robert Anderson

Offline Faithlilly

Re: The high speed return to Portimão police station incident.
« Reply #2 on: April 16, 2017, 09:32:36 PM »
'It was seven-thirty by the time one of the PJ officers drove us away from the police station. Angela Morado came with us. Ten or fifteen minutes into our journey, the police officer had a call from his station. He said something to Angela, who explained that he’d been ordered to return us to the police station straight away. He wasn’t allowed to tell us why. Already driving at quite a scary speed, he suddenly swung the car into a U-turn, floored the accelerator and drove us at a life-threatening 120mph plus back towards Portimão. I cannot overstate how terrifying this was. Had Madeleine been found? Please God. Was she alive? Was she dead? Gerry and I clung on to each other for dear life. I was crying hysterically and praying for all I was worth.

Back at the police station we endured at least another ten minutes of torture in the waiting area before somebody showed us a photograph, clearly taken from CCTV, of a blonde child with a woman in a petrol-station shop. We weren’t told anything about this, just asked whether the little girl was Madeleine. She wasn’t. And that was that. Again we were sent on our way, utterly devastated.'
« Last Edit: April 19, 2017, 04:41:42 AM by John »
Moral Guilt
Detractors of the work of our British Police in bringing criminals to justice generally ignore the important distinction between moral proof and legal evidence of guilt. In not a few cases that are popularly classed with 'unsolved mysteries of crime,' the offender is known, but evidence is wanting. If, for example, in- a recent murder case of special notoriety and interest,* certain human remains had not been found in a cellar, a great crime would have been catalogued among `Police failures'; and yet, even without the evidence which sent themurderer to the gallows, the moral proof of his guilt would have been full and clear.
Robert Anderson

Offline Alfie

Re: The high speed return to Portimão police station incident.
« Reply #3 on: April 16, 2017, 10:01:30 PM »
A police man trying to get a mother to the police station in case footage is of her missing daughter and a mother who leaves her three small children so vulnerable that one of them disappears. I know which one I'd view as more criminally culpable.
Well when you start being responsible for making laws in Portugal I'll take your opinion seriously, until then.... *&*%£
Only asking questions....

Offline G-Unit

Re: The high speed return to Portimão police station incident.
« Reply #4 on: April 17, 2017, 09:12:27 AM »
'It was seven-thirty by the time one of the PJ officers drove us away from the police station. Angela Morado came with us. Ten or fifteen minutes into our journey, the police officer had a call from his station. He said something to Angela, who explained that he’d been ordered to return us to the police station straight away. He wasn’t allowed to tell us why. Already driving at quite a scary speed, he suddenly swung the car into a U-turn, floored the accelerator and drove us at a life-threatening 120mph plus back towards Portimão. I cannot overstate how terrifying this was. Had Madeleine been found? Please God. Was she alive? Was she dead? Gerry and I clung on to each other for dear life. I was crying hysterically and praying for all I was worth.

Back at the police station we endured at least another ten minutes of torture in the waiting area before somebody showed us a photograph, clearly taken from CCTV, of a blonde child with a woman in a petrol-station shop. We weren’t told anything about this, just asked whether the little girl was Madeleine. She wasn’t. And that was that. Again we were sent on our way, utterly devastated.'

The parents must have been seated in the back seat together;

'Gerry and I clung on to each other for dear life'

Kate would be able to see the speedometer;

'drove us at a life-threatening 120mph plus back towards Portimão'

The speedometer would not have been in mph, it would have been in kph. 120 kph is 74.6 mph. Hardly life-threatening.
Accept nothing
Believe no-one
Confirm everything

Online davel

Re: The high speed return to Portimão police station incident.
« Reply #5 on: April 17, 2017, 09:24:06 AM »
The parents must have been seated in the back seat together;

'Gerry and I clung on to each other for dear life'

Kate would be able to see the speedometer;

'drove us at a life-threatening 120mph plus back towards Portimão'

The speedometer would not have been in mph, it would have been in kph. 120 kph is 74.6 mph. Hardly life-threatening.

It is life threatening
It's a stupid speed on town roads
as experienced investigators...based on the evidence...we believe Madeleine McCann was removed from the apartment by a stranger....DCI Redwood...Scotland Yard

Neither the McCanns nor their friend are persons of interest or suspects

If civil questions are being asked can we have the courtesy to provide civil answers.

Online stephen25000

Re: The high speed return to Portimão police station incident.
« Reply #6 on: April 17, 2017, 09:41:01 AM »
The parents must have been seated in the back seat together;

'Gerry and I clung on to each other for dear life'

Kate would be able to see the speedometer;

'drove us at a life-threatening 120mph plus back towards Portimão'

The speedometer would not have been in mph, it would have been in kph. 120 kph is 74.6 mph. Hardly life-threatening.

That speed is undeniably dangerous, less so to the passengers, if they are wearing seat belts and the vehicle has air bags (they can result in fatalities, if they don't deflate) etc.

Invariably, stats show, obviously more to those hit by cars, that speeds/velocities of 30 mph and above will cause deaths.
« Last Edit: April 19, 2017, 03:58:46 AM by John »
The McCanns were solely responsible for their childcare arrangements and there is no one else to blame.

S and S, two more amateurs making money from a disappeared child, and clearly without a clue.

Offline Alfie

Re: The high speed return to Portimão police station incident.
« Reply #7 on: April 17, 2017, 09:45:52 AM »
The parents must have been seated in the back seat together;

'Gerry and I clung on to each other for dear life'

Kate would be able to see the speedometer;

'drove us at a life-threatening 120mph plus back towards Portimão'

The speedometer would not have been in mph, it would have been in kph. 120 kph is 74.6 mph. Hardly life-threatening.
Hardly life-threatening?  Would you care to explain why not?
Only asking questions....

Offline G-Unit

Re: The high speed return to Portimão police station incident.
« Reply #8 on: April 17, 2017, 09:47:15 AM »
It is life threatening
It's a stupid speed on town roads

Who says 'town roads'?
Accept nothing
Believe no-one
Confirm everything

Online davel

Re: The high speed return to Portimão police station incident.
« Reply #9 on: April 17, 2017, 09:48:00 AM »
That certainly shows that Kate McCann was clueless.

However, that speed is undeniably dangerous, less so to the passengers, if they are wearing seat belts and the vehicle has air bags (they can result in fatalities, if they don't deflate) etc.

Invariably, stats show, obviously more to those hit by cars, that speeds/velocities of 30 mph and above will cause deaths.
Above 30
And the pj were driving at above 70
And gunit says that's not life threatening
Tell that to all the parents whose children have been killed by speeding motorists
as experienced investigators...based on the evidence...we believe Madeleine McCann was removed from the apartment by a stranger....DCI Redwood...Scotland Yard

Neither the McCanns nor their friend are persons of interest or suspects

If civil questions are being asked can we have the courtesy to provide civil answers.

Offline Alfie

Only asking questions....

Offline Alfie

Re: The high speed return to Portimão police station incident.
« Reply #11 on: April 17, 2017, 09:52:27 AM »
Who says 'town roads'?
You have assumed Kate made a mistake regarding the speed the car travelled, you assumed she doesn't understand the difference between KMPH and MPH, and that she didn't calculate the MPH when writing her book for her largely British and American readership.  Care to explain upon what have you based your assumption, seeing as how you don't do assumptions?
Only asking questions....

Offline Alfie

Re: The high speed return to Portimão police station incident.
« Reply #12 on: April 17, 2017, 10:00:31 AM »
Who says 'town roads'?
Would I be wrong to assume they were not traveling on a motorway, seeing as how the police officer did a U-turn, or are they permissible on Portuguese motorways?  assuming they are not, then they would have been on a "main trunk road", the national speed limit of which is 100kmph. 
Only asking questions....

Offline G-Unit

Re: The high speed return to Portimão police station incident.
« Reply #13 on: April 17, 2017, 10:14:27 AM »
You have assumed Kate made a mistake regarding the speed the car travelled, you assumed she doesn't understand the difference between KMPH and MPH, and that she didn't calculate the MPH when writing her book for her largely British and American readership.  Care to explain upon what have you based your assumption, seeing as how you don't do assumptions?

The police wanted to find her daughter for her. Time was of the essence. I assume the police can drive at any speed needed in emergencies, just as they can in the UK. I myself have been driven in a police car at 100 mph on ordinary UK roads.

Accept nothing
Believe no-one
Confirm everything

Online carlymichelle

Re: The high speed return to Portimão police station incident.
« Reply #14 on: April 17, 2017, 10:16:17 AM »
The police wanted to find her daughter for her. Time was of the essence. I assume the police can drive at any speed needed in emergencies, just as they can in the UK. I myself have been driven in a police car at 100 mph on ordinary UK roads.

they are just nit picking  g unit  in a emergancy police  or paramedics etc  dont have a speed limit  here we have to get out of the  way  of emergancy
« Last Edit: April 17, 2017, 10:21:11 AM by carlymichelle »