Author Topic: The high speed return to Portimão police station incident.  (Read 4176 times)

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Offline stephen25000

Re: The high speed return to Portimão police station incident.
« Reply #15 on: April 17, 2017, 10:17:25 AM »
Would I be wrong to assume they were not traveling on a motorway, seeing as how the police officer did a U-turn, or are they permissible on Portuguese motorways?  assuming they are not, then they would have been on a "main trunk road", the national speed limit of which is 100kmph.

In the real world how many drivers stick to the speed limits, here or abroad.

I have seen drivers, REGULARLY, exceed 100 mph on 'A' Roads (including the motorway section) and other motorways.

Then we have the emergency services................

The McCanns were solely responsible for their childcare arrangements and there is no one else to blame.

S and S, two more amateurs making money from a disappeared child, and clearly without a clue.

Offline carlymichelle

Re: The high speed return to Portimão police station incident.
« Reply #16 on: April 17, 2017, 10:22:27 AM »
In the real world how many drivers stick to the speed limits, here or abroad.

I have seen drivers, REGULARLY, exceed 100 mph on 'A' Roads (including the motorway section) and other motorways.

Then we have the emergency services................


here cars have to pull over   and get out of the  way of emergancy vehicles by law im sure its the same in the uk and portugal they have the right of  way

Offline stephen25000

Re: The high speed return to Portimão police station incident.
« Reply #17 on: April 17, 2017, 10:24:02 AM »

here cars have to pull over   and get out of the  way of emergancy vehicles by law im sure its the same in the uk and portugal they have the right of  way

Yes they do Carly.
The McCanns were solely responsible for their childcare arrangements and there is no one else to blame.

S and S, two more amateurs making money from a disappeared child, and clearly without a clue.

Alfie

  • Guest
Re: The high speed return to Portimão police station incident.
« Reply #18 on: April 17, 2017, 10:25:05 AM »
The police wanted to find her daughter for her. Time was of the essence. I assume the police can drive at any speed needed in emergencies, just as they can in the UK. I myself have been driven in a police car at 100 mph on ordinary UK roads.
That must have been terrifying not only for you but anyone else on the road at the time.  It is also highly dangerous and therefore illegal. 

Alfie

  • Guest
Re: The high speed return to Portimão police station incident.
« Reply #19 on: April 17, 2017, 10:26:21 AM »
Anyone condoning or excusing high speed emergency vehicles breaking the speed limit is on very dodgy ground IMO.

Offline stephen25000

Re: The high speed return to Portimão police station incident.
« Reply #20 on: April 17, 2017, 10:29:49 AM »
Anyone condoning or excusing high speed emergency vehicles breaking the speed limit is on very dodgy ground IMO.

Do you drive much Alfie ?

I regularly see emergency vehicles exceeding the speed limit, even along town roads.

They seem to be a law unto themselves, and they do cause accidents, fatal and otherwise.
The McCanns were solely responsible for their childcare arrangements and there is no one else to blame.

S and S, two more amateurs making money from a disappeared child, and clearly without a clue.

Alfie

  • Guest
Re: The high speed return to Portimão police station incident.
« Reply #21 on: April 17, 2017, 10:30:33 AM »
Do you drive much Alfie ?

I regularly see emergency vehicles exceeding the speed limit, even along town roads.

They seem to be a law unto themselves, and they do cause accidents, fatal and otherwise.
Exactly - do you support this? 

Offline carlymichelle

Re: The high speed return to Portimão police station incident.
« Reply #22 on: April 17, 2017, 10:32:36 AM »
stephen im not condoning    any speeding but it is  true  it is up to  drivers to get out of the  way of emergancy vehicles  in a  true  emergancy  not   vice  versa  here if a  driver hears a siren they have to pull over as soon  as possible and if it is safe to do  so

Offline stephen25000

Re: The high speed return to Portimão police station incident.
« Reply #23 on: April 17, 2017, 10:34:48 AM »
Exactly - do you support this?

They are often bloody dangerous and cause accidents themselves.

How am I supposed to stop it Alfie ?
The McCanns were solely responsible for their childcare arrangements and there is no one else to blame.

S and S, two more amateurs making money from a disappeared child, and clearly without a clue.

Offline carlymichelle

Re: The high speed return to Portimão police station incident.
« Reply #24 on: April 17, 2017, 10:37:55 AM »
 you  would  think kate  would have  beeen relieved the  police  were being so fast to react

Offline Faithlilly

Re: The high speed return to Portimão police station incident.
« Reply #25 on: April 17, 2017, 10:46:16 AM »
you  would  think kate  would have  beeen relieved the  police  were being so fast to react

Yes you would Carly.
Moral Guilt
Detractors of the work of our British Police in bringing criminals to justice generally ignore the important distinction between moral proof and legal evidence of guilt. In not a few cases that are popularly classed with 'unsolved mysteries of crime,' the offender is known, but evidence is wanting. If, for example, in- a recent murder case of special notoriety and interest,* certain human remains had not been found in a cellar, a great crime would have been catalogued among `Police failures'; and yet, even without the evidence which sent the murderer to the gallows, the moral proof of his guilt would have been full and clear.
Robert Anderson

Alfie

  • Guest
Re: The high speed return to Portimão police station incident.
« Reply #26 on: April 17, 2017, 10:51:15 AM »
They are often bloody dangerous and cause accidents themselves.

How am I supposed to stop it Alfie ?
I'm not asking you to stop it, just acknowledge that it is dangerous and can be terrifying for other road users and passengers when it occurs.

Alfie

  • Guest
Re: The high speed return to Portimão police station incident.
« Reply #27 on: April 17, 2017, 10:54:15 AM »
To be driven at high speed at far in excess of the national speed limit IS terrifying if you're not used to it, not only that but if you are being driven at life-threatening speed towards what might turn out to be the most devastating news you're ever likely to hear (assuming you survive the journey) must be doubly traumatic.  There is nothing remotely strange about Kate's reaction, and the fact that you and Amaral (neither of whom were there at the time) think so is of little interest or importance in the grand scheme of things.
« Last Edit: April 19, 2017, 03:49:35 AM by John »

Offline davel

Re: The high speed return to Portimão police station incident.
« Reply #28 on: April 17, 2017, 10:55:54 AM »
If you read Kates book you will see that the pj did not tell kate anything...probably because they didnt speak english. Kate didnt know what was going on...
« Last Edit: April 19, 2017, 03:50:51 AM by John »

Offline Benice

Re: The high speed return to Portimão police station incident.
« Reply #29 on: April 17, 2017, 11:00:26 AM »
There's nothing odd about being scared stiff because the car you are in is hurtling along the roads at  frightening speeds.   Unless your name is Kate McCann of course.

Just another example of the mantra that says

 'Everything the McCanns say is wrong and everything the McCanns do is wrong'   - and dissecting every word with the single aim of finding fault.   

 If that's not odd behaviour I don't know what is.   Totally irrational IMO.

 
« Last Edit: April 19, 2017, 03:51:13 AM by John »
The notion that innocence prevails over guilt – when there is no evidence to the contrary – is what separates civilization from barbarism.    Unfortunately, there are remains of barbarism among us.    Until very recently, it headed the PJ in Portimão. I hope he was the last one.
                                               Henrique Monteiro, chief editor, Expresso, Portugal