Author Topic: McCann v Gonçalo Amaral Libel Trial in Lisbon - Day 2 (2 witnesses)  (Read 5802 times)

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Online John

Re: McCann v Gonçalo Amaral Libel Trial in Lisbon - Day 2 (2 witnesses)
« Reply #15 on: October 01, 2013, 08:38:46 AM »
This is an extract from Angus McBrides statement
Quote
The judge (Maria Emília de Melo e Castro) is now asking

MC – what was the reaction to the shelving of the process?
AM says the impact was very quickly shadowed by the book.
Unquote.


May I query the word 'shadowed' which IMO should be 'OVERshadowed' - which has a completely different meaning to the word 'shadowed'?

The implication of 'shadowed' is merely that the book quickly followed the Shelving announcement and nothing more.   

IMO Angus McBride was actually saying that because the book followed on so swiftly -  the positive elements within the AG's report regarding the McCanns were quickly overshadowed by the book - and therefore to their detriment.

Anyone agree?

p.s. This is not a dig at anyone - just a genuine query based on 'common sense'.

Shadowed and overshadow have the sane meaning in the context they were used ie. to put in the shade.
A malicious prosecution for a crime which never existed. John Lamberton exposes malfeasance by public officials.
Check out my website >   http://johnlamberton.webs.com/index.htm?no_redirect=true     The truth never changes with the passage of time.

Offline Benice

Re: McCann v Gonçalo Amaral Libel Trial in Lisbon - Day 2 (2 witnesses)
« Reply #16 on: October 01, 2013, 09:37:39 AM »
Shadowed and overshadow have the sane meaning in the context they were used ie. to put in the shade.

I disagree John.  I can only speak personally, but to me as an English person the word  'shadowed' nowadays is more likely to  be used in the capacity of something or someone being  'followed' -  whereas  'overshadowed' means to dominate  and therefore to diminish.    In the context of the question being asked I think the latter is what AM was saying and I don't think the word 'shadowed' adequately conveys that in this particular instance.

Anyway - I've had my say - so will leave it there.











 



The notion that innocence prevails over guilt – when there is no evidence to the contrary – is what separates civilization from barbarism.    Unfortunately, there are remains of barbarism among us.    Until very recently, it headed the PJ in Portimão. I hope he was the last one.
                                               Henrique Monteiro, chief editor, Expresso, Portugal

AnneGuedes

  • Guest
Re: McCann v Gonçalo Amaral Libel Trial in Lisbon - Day 2 (2 witnesses)
« Reply #17 on: October 04, 2013, 04:50:44 PM »
I disagree John.  I can only speak personally, but to me as an English person the word  'shadowed' nowadays is more likely to  be used in the capacity of something or someone being  'followed' -  whereas  'overshadowed' means to dominate  and therefore to diminish.    In the context of the question being asked I think the latter is what AM was saying and I don't think the word 'shadowed' adequately conveys that in this particular instance.

Anyway - I've had my say - so will leave it there.











 
Benice is right, I looked in my notes, John, and I actually wrote "overshadowed by the book", it's surely what AMB said.

Online John

Re: McCann v Gonçalo Amaral Libel Trial in Lisbon - Day 2 (2 witnesses)
« Reply #18 on: October 04, 2013, 05:06:52 PM »
They can mean the same thing but I have changed it to overshadowed as you wish.  8((()*/
A malicious prosecution for a crime which never existed. John Lamberton exposes malfeasance by public officials.
Check out my website >   http://johnlamberton.webs.com/index.htm?no_redirect=true     The truth never changes with the passage of time.

AnneGuedes

  • Guest
Re: McCann v Gonçalo Amaral Libel Trial in Lisbon - Day 2 (2 witnesses)
« Reply #19 on: October 04, 2013, 05:13:18 PM »
They can mean the same thing but I have changed it to overshadowed as you wish.  8((()*/
Thank you, John, I don't understand well the difference unless "overshadow" is more involving than "shadow", but that's what Mr McBride said. I hope Benice will see that she didn't make that remark vainly !