Author Topic: Eddie's alert in the garden  (Read 16648 times)

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amaraltheofficeboy

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Eddie's alert in the garden
« on: May 13, 2013, 06:55:26 PM »
Can anybody give a video link to this alert please?

Offline DCI

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Re: Eddie's alert in the garden
« Reply #1 on: May 13, 2013, 06:57:24 PM »
Can anybody give a video link to this alert please?

No, because I don't believe there is one.  8((()*/
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Redblossom

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Re: Eddie's alert in the garden
« Reply #2 on: May 13, 2013, 07:01:04 PM »
Can anybody give a video link to this alert please?

At 33 seconds



Edited
« Last Edit: May 13, 2013, 07:05:07 PM by Redblossom »

amaraltheofficeboy

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Re: Eddie's alert in the garden
« Reply #3 on: May 13, 2013, 07:04:21 PM »
thanks for posting that redblossom.


Redblossom

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Re: Eddie's alert in the garden
« Reply #4 on: May 13, 2013, 07:06:32 PM »
thanks for posting that redblossom.

You're welcome.

amaraltheofficeboy

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Re: Eddie's alert in the garden
« Reply #5 on: May 13, 2013, 07:08:38 PM »
thanks for posting that redblossom.

You're welcome.

hate to say this but it could be bloody anywhere.

Now i know we fall out a lot - but do you have a link to the full videos?

Redblossom

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Re: Eddie's alert in the garden
« Reply #6 on: May 13, 2013, 07:16:13 PM »
thanks for posting that redblossom.

You're welcome.

hate to say this but it could be bloody anywhere.

Now i know we fall out a lot - but do you have a link to the full videos?

It can't be anywhere as it's a matter of record Eddie alerted in the bushes in 5a and he alerted in no other flats there.

http://www.mccannfiles.com/id167.html

Offline DCI

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Re: Eddie's alert in the garden
« Reply #7 on: May 13, 2013, 08:08:50 PM »
thanks for posting that redblossom.

You're welcome.

hate to say this but it could be bloody anywhere.

Now i know we fall out a lot - but do you have a link to the full videos?

The fuller link at 40.00 onwards, is a longer version of the dogs in the border.

http://www.mccannfiles.com/id167.html
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Offline Benice

Re: Eddie's alert in the garden
« Reply #8 on: May 14, 2013, 12:42:45 PM »
Somewhere amongst the statements (haven't got time to look at the mo) the question is asked of Martin Grime whether the varying levels of intensity of the dog's alert is relevant (words to that effect).   Martin Grime assures him that 'the dogs either alert or they don't.'    And yet when Eddie only barks once in the garden Grime states that it was a 'weak' alert.   That seems to be a direct contradiction of his previous assertion.




The notion that innocence prevails over guilt – when there is no evidence to the contrary – is what separates civilization from barbarism.    Unfortunately, there are remains of barbarism among us.    Until very recently, it headed the PJ in Portimão. I hope he was the last one.
                                               Henrique Monteiro, chief editor, Expresso, Portugal

Offline Mrs. B

Re: Eddie's alert in the garden
« Reply #9 on: May 14, 2013, 01:02:13 PM »
Here Benice

'Based upon the dogs' behaviour, is it possible to distinguish between a strong signal and a weak signal'.

The dogs' passive CSI alert provides an indication as per their training and does not vary. They only give an alert when they are 'positive' that the target of the odour is present and immediately accessible. If they had any doubts they would not give an alert.

http://www.mccannpjfiles.co.uk/PJ/MARTIN_GRIMES_RIGATORY.htm

Redblossom

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Re: Eddie's alert in the garden
« Reply #10 on: May 14, 2013, 01:15:41 PM »
Somewhere amongst the statements (haven't got time to look at the mo) the question is asked of Martin Grime whether the varying levels of intensity of the dog's alert is relevant (words to that effect).   Martin Grime assures him that 'the dogs either alert or they don't.'    And yet when Eddie only barks once in the garden Grime states that it was a 'weak' alert.   That seems to be a direct contradiction of his previous assertion.

This perhaps.

'Based upon the dogs' behaviour, is it possible to distinguish between a strong signal and a weak signal'.

The dogs' passive CSI alert provides an indication as per their training and does not vary. They only give an alert when they are 'positive' that the target of the odour is present and immediately accessible. If they had any doubts they would not give an alert.

EVRD gives an alert by means of a vocal bark. The variations in the vocal alert can be explained by many reasons such as 'thirst' or 'lack of air due to effort'. 

Offline ferryman

Re: Eddie's alert in the garden
« Reply #11 on: May 14, 2013, 01:33:45 PM »
Somewhere amongst the statements (haven't got time to look at the mo) the question is asked of Martin Grime whether the varying levels of intensity of the dog's alert is relevant (words to that effect).   Martin Grime assures him that 'the dogs either alert or they don't.'    And yet when Eddie only barks once in the garden Grime states that it was a 'weak' alert.   That seems to be a direct contradiction of his previous assertion.

This perhaps.

'Based upon the dogs' behaviour, is it possible to distinguish between a strong signal and a weak signal'.

The dogs' passive CSI alert provides an indication as per their training and does not vary. They only give an alert when they are 'positive' that the target of the odour is present and immediately accessible. If they had any doubts they would not give an alert.

EVRD gives an alert by means of a vocal bark. The variations in the vocal alert can be explained by many reasons such as 'thirst' or 'lack of air due to effort'.

To begin, I thought that line of questioning might have been prompted by Eddie's alert in the garden, which was more of a whimper than a bark.

But I now think it more likely to have been prompted by the inspection in the gym, the only justification for which in the files seems to be to re-test clothing (sic) "possibly alerted to in the villa".

That inspection, even more than the one in the villa, wreaks of something unsavoury and underhand.

I wouldn't be at all surprised if the questioning was prompted by our old friend Inspector Dias, who is my absolute PJ hero in the Madeleine investigation.
« Last Edit: May 14, 2013, 01:37:37 PM by ferryman »
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Redblossom

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Re: Eddie's alert in the garden
« Reply #12 on: May 14, 2013, 01:44:01 PM »
Eddie's alert in the garden, which was more of a whimper than a bark.


***

Clearly a bark.

ETA I have looked at the whole outside search and believe you are correct, the two alerts are more like ruffs or wimpers in the garden, the bark audible in the short PT voiced over video I believe took place on the verandah, in the video here at 56.25 though its so dark its hard to distinguish


The garden *noises* were at 53 mins or so. The search ends at 58 mins

ETA @ Benice below, I have no idea

« Last Edit: May 14, 2013, 02:11:12 PM by Redblossom »

Offline Benice

Re: Eddie's alert in the garden
« Reply #13 on: May 14, 2013, 01:52:06 PM »
Somewhere amongst the statements (haven't got time to look at the mo) the question is asked of Martin Grime whether the varying levels of intensity of the dog's alert is relevant (words to that effect).   Martin Grime assures him that 'the dogs either alert or they don't.'    And yet when Eddie only barks once in the garden Grime states that it was a 'weak' alert.   That seems to be a direct contradiction of his previous assertion.

This perhaps.

'Based upon the dogs' behaviour, is it possible to distinguish between a strong signal and a weak signal'.

The dogs' passive CSI alert provides an indication as per their training and does not vary. They only give an alert when they are 'positive' that the target of the odour is present and immediately accessible. If they had any doubts they would not give an alert.

EVRD gives an alert by means of a vocal bark. The variations in the vocal alert can be explained by many reasons such as 'thirst' or 'lack of air due to effort'.

Thanks Redblossom (also Mrs B) - I'm still puzzled as to why he thought it was necessary to point out that in his opinion the dog's alert in the garden was a weak one if,  as he claims,  no different conclusions are to be drawn from weak alerts as opposed to strong ones.   What was the point he was making? 

Also  - whilst on the subject of the garden alert.  I have never heard any evidence that any investigative 'digging'  took place at that spot.  If not why not?


The notion that innocence prevails over guilt – when there is no evidence to the contrary – is what separates civilization from barbarism.    Unfortunately, there are remains of barbarism among us.    Until very recently, it headed the PJ in Portimão. I hope he was the last one.
                                               Henrique Monteiro, chief editor, Expresso, Portugal

AnneGuedes

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Re: Eddie's alert in the garden
« Reply #14 on: May 14, 2013, 01:59:43 PM »
There's not much to dig there, very much occupied by the roots of a Bougainvilliers.