Author Topic: Website that analyses the Anni Dewani murder in detail  (Read 38414 times)

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Offline dewanifacts

Website that analyses the Anni Dewani murder in detail
« on: August 04, 2015, 04:07:12 PM »
If any of you people are still interested in this case and its many unanswered questions, you may be interested in our analysis and latest news/blog. Check out our site https://dewanifacts.wordpress.com/


Editor added Trial Report.

www.saflii.org/za/cases/ZAWCHC/2014/188.html

329
« Last Edit: September 03, 2015, 10:40:18 PM by John »

Online John

Re: Website that analyses the Anni Dewani murder in detail
« Reply #1 on: August 04, 2015, 05:08:51 PM »
If any of you people are still interested in this case and its many unanswered questions, you may be interested in our analysis and latest news/blog. Check out our site https://dewanifacts.wordpress.com/

Thank you for the information and welcome to the forum.   8((()*/

I read the blog some time ago and one thing which still bothers me is the number of unknowns still to be addressed.  One such being as to why Shrien Dewani refused to cooperate with the S African authorities?
« Last Edit: August 04, 2015, 05:13:29 PM by John »
A malicious prosecution for a crime which never existed. John Lamberton exposes malfeasance by public officials.
Check out my website >   http://johnlamberton.webs.com/index.htm?no_redirect=true     The truth never changes with the passage of time.

Offline dewanifacts

Re: Website that analyses the Anni Dewani murder in detail
« Reply #2 on: August 04, 2015, 05:34:25 PM »
Thanks John. Regarding Dewani's "refusal" to cooperate with SA authorities, I guess the term "refusal" is in the eye of the beholder.

He cooperated up to the point where he realised he was being framed for a crime that he didn't commit by the SA Police Service and the NPA. At that point he clammed up and did what he could to avoid willingly submitting himself to injustice.

One of the common refrains that people have is "why didn't he just go to South Africa and clear his name?". The answer is simple. He was entitled to the presumption of innocence and the onus is never on someone to prove their innocence. There was never any credible evidence of him having anything to do with the crime. He knew that because he knew he was innocent. And he was ultimately vindicated by the court chucking the case out for that very same reason; no credible evidence linking him to the crime. 

Having said that; I do agree with you that one of the most puzzling mysteries that remain, is item 8 on the "Unknowns" page of our site. Shrien Dewani’s reason(s) for not telling SAPS about the money or the helicopter ride when he was first debriefed in the aftermath of the murder. In that respect he didn't cooperate, although we still don't know whether he ommitted those details consciously or whether he had some other reason for doing so. Those omissions made him look very suspicious and in my opinion he would do himself a great service if he came out and explained himself in an interview, book, article or some other format.






« Last Edit: August 04, 2015, 05:39:57 PM by dewanifacts »

Offline dewanifacts

Re: Website that analyses the Anni Dewani murder in detail
« Reply #3 on: August 05, 2015, 02:43:51 PM »
Our aim is for the website to be a complete and accurate representation of the facts and claims made in regard to the case. We would value any feedback from forum members. If you think that we need to amend/delete any content, if you feel we should add in specific content, or if you think that we have wrongly catagorised any of the claims, please let us know. We welcome all feedback and we are happy to discuss.

Many thanks

Offline mercury

Re: Website that analyses the Anni Dewani murder in detail
« Reply #4 on: August 05, 2015, 08:51:03 PM »
Hi there DF,welcome

The thing  that bothered me was that he took his wife whilst on honeymoon no less, (not that any other time would have been great either) to one of the most dangerous parts of the area at night....what for?




Offline dewanifacts

Re: Website that analyses the Anni Dewani murder in detail
« Reply #5 on: August 06, 2015, 03:57:29 PM »
Hi mercury,

Its a fair question and is partially answered on our website. Item Baseless (26) - https://dewanifacts.wordpress.com/baseless/

Despite being dangerous, Gugulethu has jazz bars and other nightlife that is marketed by Cape Town's tourism website.

The second part of the answer is to point out that Dewani wasn't the driver of the car and therefore it wasn't actually he who took his wife into such a dangerous area.  Tongo (their taxi driver) had engaged in some discussion with Anni about what they might want to do or see after dinner, and Anni allegedly said that she'd be quite keen to see the "real Africa" and thus her and Shrien placed themselves at Tongo's guidance. They did exactly what thousands of other tourists do every day; they trusted their friendly local tour guide. When the hijack occured, Shrien and Anni were apparently flicking through photos from the game reserve leg of their honeymoon, only half concentrating on their exact whereabouts, which is not surprising given they were driving on a dark freeway with nothing much to see. 

Offline mercury

Re: Website that analyses the Anni Dewani murder in detail
« Reply #6 on: August 06, 2015, 10:05:53 PM »
Thanks DF


Offline Passer-by

Re: Website that analyses the Anni Dewani murder in detail
« Reply #7 on: August 08, 2015, 11:10:09 PM »
Some more facts for you Dewanifacts:

1). It stood out as mile as a murder from the nanosecond it hit the news.  I lived in South Africa for nearly a decade:  family annihilators, hijackings, murders - they are a daily occurance in the news.  In that context it stood out like a saw thumb that the woman had died but the man survived:  that simply never happens.  South African criminals are very hardened and in Africa life is cheap:  if something goes wrong in SA it goes epically wrong and you're highly likely to be shot dead.  Sometimes the girl gets away whilst they're shooting the guy - he usually is either trying to prevent the car jacking or protecting the girl, occasionally they might let them get out the car and drive off - but mostly the hijackers don't want any hassel or witnesses, so having got out of the car the occupants are shot dead.  They don't shoot them inside the car:  it takes ages to get a dead body out of the driver's seat and it messes up the car too.  And who the hell thinks a man can exit a moving car by doing a forward roll out if the window - and without even a scratch, let alone broken bones and half-skinned:  that's seriously taking the piss.  And why are cars hijacked?  To be immediately stripped and turned into spare parts:  that model wasn't even one that's normally hijacked because there isn't a big market for its spare parts:  which is why it was abandoned.  So they hijacked the car to abandon it?  Okay!  Maybe they hijacked it to rape the girl:  in which case how lucky it had a pretty girl in it.  South African prisons are vile with open gutters to crap in and cockroaches crawling over the occupants:  criminals can rape any kind of girl in a Township at far less risk than targeting a foreign tourist.

2) The Taxi:  just HOW did he manage to get an unlicensed one?  They aren't allowed to tout for business in Cape Town Airport and all the luxurious hotels have a shuttle bus. Right outside the Cape Grace is a taxi rank - but only the poshest, licensed taxis.  A short walk further along, outside the shopping mall, is another taxi rank:  less smart cars (all still old Mercs etc) but all still licensed.  Driving around the area dropping people off are loads more taxis - all licensed.  In fact, having lived in CTN and used to jumping in taxis, I still don't know what he was doing in an unlicensed one.  The taxi drivers were all prepped for the Workd Cup:  they will advise you if they think you are going somewhere dangerous or foolish and suggest a better alternative.

3).  Nobody, but nobody, visits CapeTown and immediately visits a dangerous township.  They just don't.  Most people don't visit a township at all, but if they do want to the Tourist Information Office about 30 seconds walk from the Cape Grace Hotel, where the Dewanis were staying, can organise a proper tourist-friendly Shabeen tour - a Shabeen is a township pub.  For that matter I expect the concierge of the hotel would also organise it with the tourist office for them.  But as I said, NOBODY does this probably even in their first fortnight in Cape Town, possibly even ever.  The Cape Grace is a super-delux hotel right on the tip of the V&A waterfront:  you step out to an incredibly pretty waterside development with dozens of pavement cafes, restaurants, art galleries, wine bars, buskers, live jazz, fishing boats, visiting war ships, a steamer that does harbour tours, the ferry across to Robben Island, the lifeboat, a lighthouse, a variety of moving pedestrian bridges which shut periodically to let another boat through, shops selling model ships, ostrich egg lights, local beadwork, every evening the friendly seals are coaxed into a safe area with food - all this with a backdrop of historic buildings and the magnificent mountain itself.  There was no need for Dewani to take his new wife to some crappy little shopping centre with half the shops closed several miles away:  right next to the hotel is a world-class shopping centre with everything they could desire - designer luxury goods, clothes, South Africa's unique take on interior decor, food, tourist souvenirs, wine, jewellers - all open late 7 days a week.  If that wasn't enough  Theresa us also a multiplex cinema in there - or if that doesn't fancy, the IMAX is 5 mins walk further, as is the World Class Aquarium and its neighbouring craft market.  Feeling more adventurous:  walk, take a river taxi or a road taxi or a rickshaw 5 mins into Cape Town CBD:  enjoy the eclectic shops, the Art Deco architecture, Parliament Gardens, the Slave Museum, the Flower Market, produce from all over Africa in Greenmarket Square, more buskers and music and the fabulous late, late nightlife and live music in the Cigar Bars and cafes of Long Street.  Bored now?  Time to go up the mountain in the rotating cable car to admire the view, feed the dassies and wild turkeys, maybe do the world's highest commercial abseil?  Then of course there's the famous Kirstenbosh botanic gardens - and we haven't even hit the beach yet!  Choices-choices:  so many, all with powdery white sand and the sun setting into the sea.  Frankly, amongst the best beaches in the world:  and fringing them is a collection of seaside villages all with fabulously chic bars, African tradesmen selling seashells, beads, local craft markets etc.  STILL bored?  Well that's when most people head for Robben Island to see where Nelson Mandela was imprisoned and understand more of the local history.  Or the castle.  Or the many vineyards with thatched Cape Dutch buildings and avenues of 400 year old oak trees - each with Michelin level restaurants serving food to accompany their wine.  BUT EVEN THEN most people still haven't exhausted their possibilities:  further round there's the naval town of Simonstown:  you can go whale watching in false bay - even do a helicopter ride around the mountain.

So I hope you can see now why it stands out like a sore thumb that he took her to a shitty dangerous township in an unlicensed taxi as soon as they arrived and that it's inconceivable that he was allowed to live whilst she was murdered.

Offline puglove

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Re: Website that analyses the Anni Dewani murder in detail
« Reply #8 on: August 08, 2015, 11:45:59 PM »
Some more facts for you Dewanifacts:

1). It stood out as mile as a murder from the nanosecond it hit the news.  I lived in South Africa for nearly a decade:  family annihilators, hijackings, murders - they are a daily occurance in the news.  In that context it stood out like a saw thumb that the woman had died but the man survived:  that simply never happens.  South African criminals are very hardened and in Africa life is cheap:  if something goes wrong in SA it goes epically wrong and you're highly likely to be shot dead.  Sometimes the girl gets away whilst they're shooting the guy - he usually is either trying to prevent the car jacking or protecting the girl, occasionally they might let them get out the car and drive off - but mostly the hijackers don't want any hassel or witnesses, so having got out of the car the occupants are shot dead.  They don't shoot them inside the car:  it takes ages to get a dead body out of the driver's seat and it messes up the car too.  And who the hell thinks a man can exit a moving car by doing a forward roll out if the window - and without even a scratch, let alone broken bones and half-skinned:  that's seriously taking the piss.  And why are cars hijacked?  To be immediately stripped and turned into spare parts:  that model wasn't even one that's normally hijacked because there isn't a big market for its spare parts:  which is why it was abandoned.  So they hijacked the car to abandon it?  Okay!  Maybe they hijacked it to rape the girl:  in which case how lucky it had a pretty girl in it.  South African prisons are vile with open gutters to crap in and cockroaches crawling over the occupants:  criminals can rape any kind of girl in a Township at far less risk than targeting a foreign tourist.

2) The Taxi:  just HOW did he manage to get an unlicensed one?  They aren't allowed to tout for business in Cape Town Airport and all the luxurious hotels have a shuttle bus. Right outside the Cape Grace is a taxi rank - but only the poshest, licensed taxis.  A short walk further along, outside the shopping mall, is another taxi rank:  less smart cars (all still old Mercs etc) but all still licensed.  Driving around the area dropping people off are loads more taxis - all licensed.  In fact, having lived in CTN and used to jumping in taxis, I still don't know what he was doing in an unlicensed one.  The taxi drivers were all prepped for the Workd Cup:  they will advise you if they think you are going somewhere dangerous or foolish and suggest a better alternative.

3).  Nobody, but nobody, visits CapeTown and immediately visits a dangerous township.  They just don't.  Most people don't visit a township at all, but if they do want to the Tourist Information Office about 30 seconds walk from the Cape Grace Hotel, where the Dewanis were staying, can organise a proper tourist-friendly Shabeen tour - a Shabeen is a township pub.  For that matter I expect the concierge of the hotel would also organise it with the tourist office for them.  But as I said, NOBODY does this probably even in their first fortnight in Cape Town, possibly even ever.  The Cape Grace is a super-delux hotel right on the tip of the V&A waterfront:  you step out to an incredibly pretty waterside development with dozens of pavement cafes, restaurants, art galleries, wine bars, buskers, live jazz, fishing boats, visiting war ships, a steamer that does harbour tours, the ferry across to Robben Island, the lifeboat, a lighthouse, a variety of moving pedestrian bridges which shut periodically to let another boat through, shops selling model ships, ostrich egg lights, local beadwork, every evening the friendly seals are coaxed into a safe area with food - all this with a backdrop of historic buildings and the magnificent mountain itself.  There was no need for Dewani to take his new wife to some crappy little shopping centre with half the shops closed several miles away:  right next to the hotel is a world-class shopping centre with everything they could desire - designer luxury goods, clothes, South Africa's unique take on interior decor, food, tourist souvenirs, wine, jewellers - all open late 7 days a week.  If that wasn't enough  Theresa us also a multiplex cinema in there - or if that doesn't fancy, the IMAX is 5 mins walk further, as is the World Class Aquarium and its neighbouring craft market.  Feeling more adventurous:  walk, take a river taxi or a road taxi or a rickshaw 5 mins into Cape Town CBD:  enjoy the eclectic shops, the Art Deco architecture, Parliament Gardens, the Slave Museum, the Flower Market, produce from all over Africa in Greenmarket Square, more buskers and music and the fabulous late, late nightlife and live music in the Cigar Bars and cafes of Long Street.  Bored now?  Time to go up the mountain in the rotating cable car to admire the view, feed the dassies and wild turkeys, maybe do the world's highest commercial abseil?  Then of course there's the famous Kirstenbosh botanic gardens - and we haven't even hit the beach yet!  Choices-choices:  so many, all with powdery white sand and the sun setting into the sea.  Frankly, amongst the best beaches in the world:  and fringing them is a collection of seaside villages all with fabulously chic bars, African tradesmen selling seashells, beads, local craft markets etc.  STILL bored?  Well that's when most people head for Robben Island to see where Nelson Mandela was imprisoned and understand more of the local history.  Or the castle.  Or the many vineyards with thatched Cape Dutch buildings and avenues of 400 year old oak trees - each with Michelin level restaurants serving food to accompany their wine.  BUT EVEN THEN most people still haven't exhausted their possibilities:  further round there's the naval town of Simonstown:  you can go whale watching in false bay - even do a helicopter ride around the mountain.

So I hope you can see now why it stands out like a sore thumb that he took her to a shitty dangerous township in an unlicensed taxi as soon as they arrived and that it's inconceivable that he was allowed to live whilst she was murdered.

Blimey. Check you out! Kudos!
« Last Edit: August 12, 2015, 08:55:37 PM by Admin »
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Offline dewanifacts

Re: Website that analyses the Anni Dewani murder in detail
« Reply #9 on: August 09, 2015, 09:29:47 AM »
Some more facts for you Dewanifacts:

1). It stood out as mile as a murder from the nanosecond it hit the news.  I lived in South Africa for nearly a decade:  family annihilators, hijackings, murders - they are a daily occurance in the news.  In that context it stood out like a saw thumb that the woman had died but the man survived:  that simply never happens.  South African criminals are very hardened and in Africa life is cheap:  if something goes wrong in SA it goes epically wrong and you're highly likely to be shot dead.  Sometimes the girl gets away whilst they're shooting the guy - he usually is either trying to prevent the car jacking or protecting the girl, occasionally they might let them get out the car and drive off - but mostly the hijackers don't want any hassel or witnesses, so having got out of the car the occupants are shot dead.  They don't shoot them inside the car:  it takes ages to get a dead body out of the driver's seat and it messes up the car too.  And who the hell thinks a man can exit a moving car by doing a forward roll out if the window - and without even a scratch, let alone broken bones and half-skinned:  that's seriously taking the piss.  And why are cars hijacked?  To be immediately stripped and turned into spare parts:  that model wasn't even one that's normally hijacked because there isn't a big market for its spare parts:  which is why it was abandoned.  So they hijacked the car to abandon it?  Okay!  Maybe they hijacked it to rape the girl:  in which case how lucky it had a pretty girl in it.  South African prisons are vile with open gutters to crap in and cockroaches crawling over the occupants:  criminals can rape any kind of girl in a Township at far less risk than targeting a foreign tourist.

2) The Taxi:  just HOW did he manage to get an unlicensed one?  They aren't allowed to tout for business in Cape Town Airport and all the luxurious hotels have a shuttle bus. Right outside the Cape Grace is a taxi rank - but only the poshest, licensed taxis.  A short walk further along, outside the shopping mall, is another taxi rank:  less smart cars (all still old Mercs etc) but all still licensed.  Driving around the area dropping people off are loads more taxis - all licensed.  In fact, having lived in CTN and used to jumping in taxis, I still don't know what he was doing in an unlicensed one.  The taxi drivers were all prepped for the Workd Cup:  they will advise you if they think you are going somewhere dangerous or foolish and suggest a better alternative.

3).  Nobody, but nobody, visits CapeTown and immediately visits a dangerous township.  They just don't.  Most people don't visit a township at all, but if they do want to the Tourist Information Office about 30 seconds walk from the Cape Grace Hotel, where the Dewanis were staying, can organise a proper tourist-friendly Shabeen tour - a Shabeen is a township pub.  For that matter I expect the concierge of the hotel would also organise it with the tourist office for them.  But as I said, NOBODY does this probably even in their first fortnight in Cape Town, possibly even ever.  The Cape Grace is a super-delux hotel right on the tip of the V&A waterfront:  you step out to an incredibly pretty waterside development with dozens of pavement cafes, restaurants, art galleries, wine bars, buskers, live jazz, fishing boats, visiting war ships, a steamer that does harbour tours, the ferry across to Robben Island, the lifeboat, a lighthouse, a variety of moving pedestrian bridges which shut periodically to let another boat through, shops selling model ships, ostrich egg lights, local beadwork, every evening the friendly seals are coaxed into a safe area with food - all this with a backdrop of historic buildings and the magnificent mountain itself.  There was no need for Dewani to take his new wife to some crappy little shopping centre with half the shops closed several miles away:  right next to the hotel is a world-class shopping centre with everything they could desire - designer luxury goods, clothes, South Africa's unique take on interior decor, food, tourist souvenirs, wine, jewellers - all open late 7 days a week.  If that wasn't enough  Theresa us also a multiplex cinema in there - or if that doesn't fancy, the IMAX is 5 mins walk further, as is the World Class Aquarium and its neighbouring craft market.  Feeling more adventurous:  walk, take a river taxi or a road taxi or a rickshaw 5 mins into Cape Town CBD:  enjoy the eclectic shops, the Art Deco architecture, Parliament Gardens, the Slave Museum, the Flower Market, produce from all over Africa in Greenmarket Square, more buskers and music and the fabulous late, late nightlife and live music in the Cigar Bars and cafes of Long Street.  Bored now?  Time to go up the mountain in the rotating cable car to admire the view, feed the dassies and wild turkeys, maybe do the world's highest commercial abseil?  Then of course there's the famous Kirstenbosh botanic gardens - and we haven't even hit the beach yet!  Choices-choices:  so many, all with powdery white sand and the sun setting into the sea.  Frankly, amongst the best beaches in the world:  and fringing them is a collection of seaside villages all with fabulously chic bars, African tradesmen selling seashells, beads, local craft markets etc.  STILL bored?  Well that's when most people head for Robben Island to see where Nelson Mandela was imprisoned and understand more of the local history.  Or the castle.  Or the many vineyards with thatched Cape Dutch buildings and avenues of 400 year old oak trees - each with Michelin level restaurants serving food to accompany their wine.  BUT EVEN THEN most people still haven't exhausted their possibilities:  further round there's the naval town of Simonstown:  you can go whale watching in false bay - even do a helicopter ride around the mountain.

So I hope you can see now why it stands out like a sore thumb that he took her to a shitty dangerous township in an unlicensed taxi as soon as they arrived and that it's inconceivable that he was allowed to live whilst she was murdered.

Thanks for your elaborate response. Those aren't facts, my friend. Those are your subjective opinions and thoughts on how you believe tourists should behave. Why was none of that introduced as evidence in court? Because it's not evidence and doesn't prove anything.

Addressing your points individually:

1. Your misinformation on carjackings is rather blatant. Yes, in many cases victims are killed and witnesses are eliminated, however in the vast majority of carjackings, robbery is the prime motive, and the occupants walk away. Sometimes the car itself is the target, but more often than not, it's the money and valuables that the thieves want. A taxi with two wealthy foreign tourists dressed for a night out, makes an excellent robbery proposition, particularly when the taxi driver is in on the operation and has scoped out the targets and gained their trust.

2. How did they get an unlicensed taxi? For someone who has lived in Cape Town, you appear to be blissfully unaware of the airport workings. Unlicensed drivers regularly tout for business outside the doors (they're not permitted inside and technically they're not permitted outside either but it's not policed strictly). The unlicensed guys sell their services by offering discounted rates combined with a defacto tour guide service. "Come with me Sir. It will save you money and I can also be your tour guide, not just a taxi driver to take you from A to B". Deal hunters, even rich ones, often take up this offer. That's what Dewani did.

3. As mentioned above, this is simply your subjective view of how a tourist in Cape Town would behave. It proves nothing. Every tourist travels differently. Some people enjoy guided tours. Some people just want to walk around. Some stay in the main safe tourist zone. Others want to explore the less touristy areas. Some like those open top tour buses. Some prefer to hire a car and drive themselves. Others are happy to place themselves in the hands of a friendly local tour guide. Dewani did the latter.

Like many people, you appear to have made up your mind early on that this was a planned hit, and you have bought into the salacious media narrative, choosing to ignore everything that doesn't fit with that.

Put your 3 "points" to the side for a minute, and instead think about the allegations against Dewani and the credibility of those making the allegations, as well as the veracity of the allegations themselves. Why did Tongo, Mbolombo and Qwabe tell so many lies when testifying? Their freedom and their plea deals were contingent on one simple thing: telling the truth. Why couldn't they do that? Why did they fabricate calls and texts that even the prosecution admits did not exist? Why did Tongo and Mbolombo lie and contradict each other when asked to identify the fifth conspirator referred to in the taped phone call?

Have a read of this article which examines it in more detail: "Did Shrien Dewani get away with murder?"

« Last Edit: August 09, 2015, 09:42:02 AM by dewanifacts »

Offline Passer-by

Re: Website that analyses the Anni Dewani murder in detail
« Reply #10 on: August 09, 2015, 10:42:36 AM »
Thanks for your elaborate response. Those aren't facts, my friend. Those are your subjective opinions and thoughts on how you believe tourists should behave. Why was none of that introduced as evidence in court? Because it's not evidence and doesn't prove anything.

Addressing your points individually:

1. Your misinformation on carjackings is rather blatant. Yes, in many cases victims are killed and witnesses are eliminated, however in the vast majority of carjackings, robbery is the prime motive, and the occupants walk away. Sometimes the car itself is the target, but more often than not, it's the money and valuables that the thieves want. A taxi with two wealthy foreign tourists dressed for a night out, makes an excellent robbery proposition, particularly when the taxi driver is in on the operation and has scoped out the targets and gained their trust.

2. How did they get an unlicensed taxi? For someone who has lived in Cape Town, you appear to be blissfully unaware of the airport workings. Unlicensed drivers regularly tout for business outside the doors (they're not permitted inside and technically they're not permitted outside either but it's not policed strictly). The unlicensed guys sell their services by offering discounted rates combined with a defacto tour guide service. "Come with me Sir. It will save you money and I can also be your tour guide, not just a taxi driver to take you from A to B". Deal hunters, even rich ones, often take up this offer. That's what Dewani did.

3. As mentioned above, this is simply your subjective view of how a tourist in Cape Town would behave. It proves nothing. Every tourist travels differently. Some people enjoy guided tours. Some people just want to walk around. Some stay in the main safe tourist zone. Others want to explore the less touristy areas. Some like those open top tour buses. Some prefer to hire a car and drive themselves. Others are happy to place themselves in the hands of a friendly local tour guide. Dewani did the latter.

Like many people, you appear to have made up your mind early on that this was a planned hit, and you have bought into the salacious media narrative, choosing to ignore everything that doesn't fit with that.

Put your 3 "points" to the side for a minute, and instead think about the allegations against Dewani and the credibility of those making the allegations, as well as the veracity of the allegations themselves. Why did Tongo, Mbolombo and Qwabe tell so many lies when testifying? Their freedom and their plea deals were contingent on one simple thing: telling the truth. Why couldn't they do that? Why did they fabricate calls and texts that even the prosecution admits did not exist? Why did Tongo and Mbolombo lie and contradict each other when asked to identify the fifth conspirator referred to in the taped phone call?

Have a read of this article which examines it in more detail: "Did Shrien Dewani get away with murder?"

I've flown in and out of Cape Town Airport dozens of times and the licensed taxi drivers have ID and are allowed inside the airport:  you have to walk through them - assuming you don't want to take the dedicated hotel shuttle bus - and out of the airport, where security guards do indeed move-on the malingerers and unlicensed drivers - and down the road to find yourself a bloke with an ordinary car who will drive you for less cash.  Why a millionaire staying in a 5 Star hotel with an airport shuttle bus needs to save himself a tenner I don't know.

I can say what a tourist would do because I actually lived on the Waterfront and in the CBD and watched them doing it.  Thanks to SA's reputation most tourists are terrified of their security even within the highly secured 'tourist' areas.  I can also state that I have never encountered anyone who ever visited a township.  I've driven through townships, but then I mostly encountered non-white South Africans in my life there and drove over virtually every road in the country - a lone female in a high end car without ever encountering trouble.

It's interesting that you should mention hijackings being for the money:  most tourists who are hijacked are driving themselves in a hire car, not in a taxi.  Why on earth would a couple who want to see a township have much money on them?  What would they need, maybe £30 tops?  Drinks suddenly very expensive out in the pubs of people who live in houses made of plastic bags and flattened coke cans, are they? And I notice you completely ignore the preposterous idea that anyone could exit a moving car window head first without depositing their head right in front of the moving rear wheel, or why at that point the hijackers wouldn't at that point just shoot him dead:  I bet he didn't even lose his watch, did he?

I formulated this opinion immediately on hearing the news of the hijacking, days before anyone suggested it was murder:  it's elements were all too fantastical.  Of course the humdinger was why a newly married man do this?  The fact it came out that he wouldn't sleep with her and then had seen a gay escort all made the 'why' fall into place.  I think it was a massive politically correct error of the judge not to allow the escort's testimony:  it was not about him 'being gay' - it was about his family not knowing that fact and him trying to cover it up. 

There is no ambiguity about this case.  I agree the plea bargaining besmirched the SA justice system, but you are fishing around for a legal technicality that lets him off the hook, just like the Sion Jenkins case.  Dewani tried to construct a story based on what he thought was 'normal' in South Africa - but it contains an insane number of elements which completely fly in the face of 'normal' or even 'likely' or, in the case of getting out of the moving car even 'possible'.

But most interesting is the fact that he got off - what a tonic that was for his mental health - yet apparently people still feel the need to 'clear' his name on a site about miscarriages of justice. 
« Last Edit: August 12, 2015, 08:58:09 PM by Admin »

Offline Passer-by

Re: Website that analyses the Anni Dewani murder in detail
« Reply #11 on: August 09, 2015, 11:37:22 AM »
"He said that, held at gunpoint, the couple were driven around the township, being told by the kidnappers: "We are not going to hurt you. We just want the car."

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Murder_of_Anni_Dewani

For the benefit of people in the UK this is roughly analogous to booking to stay at the Savoy for your honeymoon but not walking over the road to wander around the bars and buskers of Covent Garden, nor walk round the corner to the river and across the millennium bridge to the London eye, nor walk half a minute to Trafalgar Square and all its art galleries nor walk 3 minutes to see a West End show, but instead decide the first thing you'd like to do is hire an Uber taxi to take you round some closed shops in Lewisham followed by a tour of Elephant And Castle so you can see 'the real London'.  Except both those places are close to central London whereas the Dewanis went on the equivalent of a trip to Brighton.
« Last Edit: August 12, 2015, 09:08:33 PM by Admin »

Offline Passer-by

Re: Website that analyses the Anni Dewani murder in detail
« Reply #12 on: August 09, 2015, 11:41:06 AM »
But like you say Dewanifacts:  how can I possibly say what tourists 'normally' do when visiting London!? @)(++(*

Offline dewanifacts

Re: Website that analyses the Anni Dewani murder in detail
« Reply #13 on: August 09, 2015, 11:57:06 AM »
Are you going to try to explain why Tongo, Qwabe and Mbolombo told a pack of lies while testifying?

Offline dewanifacts

Re: Website that analyses the Anni Dewani murder in detail
« Reply #14 on: August 09, 2015, 12:01:50 PM »
1). It stood out as mile as a murder from the nanosecond it hit the news.  I lived in South Africa for nearly a decade:  family annihilators, hijackings, murders - they are a daily occurance in the news.  In that context it stood out like a saw thumb that the woman had died but the man survived:  that simply never happens

I'm afraid this a very justice4anni style argument you are attempting to make. The only reason you don't know about all the carjackings where occupants walk away unharmed, is because there are so goddamn many of them, that they don't even make the news in SA! Just take a look at the crime stats - https://africacheck.org/factsheets/factsheet-south-africas-official-crime-statistics-for-201314/

Over 100,000 aggravated robberies per year. Sure - lots involve murder, but the vast majority don't. People walk away unhurt all the time. It never even makes the news, and then people like you erroneously conclude that "it simply never happens".
« Last Edit: August 09, 2015, 12:08:32 PM by dewanifacts »