Author Topic: ISIS Brides, should they be allowed back ?  (Read 2834 times)

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Offline Vertigo Swirl

Re: ISIS Brides, should they be allowed back ?
« Reply #15 on: February 18, 2019, 08:08:51 AM »
Being s threat to national security can result in loss of citizenship
This woman should be made an example of so that when other girls decide to go find an ISIS husband they know that they will be banished from the country forever. 
"The answer is that no-one here believes the parents were directly involved in MM's disappearance" - G-Unit.

Online G-Unit

Re: ISIS Brides, should they be allowed back ?
« Reply #16 on: February 18, 2019, 08:10:39 AM »
They can be stripped of their citizenship.  Leaving the country to join ISIS should result in an automatic rescinding of all citizenship rights IMO.

People with only British citizenship can't be stripped of their citizenship.
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Offline Vertigo Swirl

Re: ISIS Brides, should they be allowed back ?
« Reply #17 on: February 18, 2019, 08:14:53 AM »
People with only British citizenship can't be stripped of their citizenship.
Oh.  Better tell the Home Secretary then cos he said they could.  Once again, you demonstrate your superior knowledge in all things.
"The answer is that no-one here believes the parents were directly involved in MM's disappearance" - G-Unit.

Online Davel

Re: ISIS Brides, should they be allowed back ?
« Reply #18 on: February 18, 2019, 08:16:43 AM »
you need to do a little more research



People with only British citizenship can't be stripped of their citizenship.

You can lose your citizenship if you’re a naturalised British citizen if it’s found that you’ve lied on your application. Although it’s possible to lose your citizenship if you’re a British national by birth, it’s unusual, and usually only happens if someone is considered a threat to national security. The Home Secretary can choose to remove citizenship in this case.

transferwise.com/gb/blog/dual-citizenship-united-kingdom

British citizenship used to be for life - but a growing number of people are being stripped of their passports. BBC Radio 4's Law in Action programme investigates.
www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-politics-21783475


Under section 40 of the British Nationality Act 1981, as amended in 2006, the home secretary may make an order depriving a person of citizenship status if they are "satisfied that deprivation is conducive to the public good". No reasons need be given and no court approval is required.

« Last Edit: February 18, 2019, 08:19:33 AM by Davel »
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Offline Vertigo Swirl

Re: ISIS Brides, should they be allowed back ?
« Reply #19 on: February 18, 2019, 08:23:40 AM »
Perhaps we should put it to a national referendum,  I have a feeling I know which way the public would vote and then we would be morally obliged to carry out the will of the people.
« Last Edit: February 18, 2019, 08:25:50 AM by Vertigo Swirl »
"The answer is that no-one here believes the parents were directly involved in MM's disappearance" - G-Unit.

Online G-Unit

Re: ISIS Brides, should they be allowed back ?
« Reply #20 on: February 18, 2019, 08:36:20 AM »
This woman should be made an example of so that when other girls decide to go find an ISIS husband they know that they will be banished from the country forever.

Making examples of people has never been shown to work, unfortunately. It's an empty threat anyway as British  born citizens can't be banished. She should be prosecuted if she's committed an offence and she should be closely monitored. The best outcome would be rehabilitation followed by her speaking out to advise others not to do as she did, She may be saying certain things at the moment to keep herself safe from retaliation.
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Online G-Unit

Re: ISIS Brides, should they be allowed back ?
« Reply #21 on: February 18, 2019, 08:53:22 AM »
you need to do a little more research



You can lose your citizenship if you’re a naturalised British citizen if it’s found that you’ve lied on your application. Although it’s possible to lose your citizenship if you’re a British national by birth, it’s unusual, and usually only happens if someone is considered a threat to national security. The Home Secretary can choose to remove citizenship in this case.

transferwise.com/gb/blog/dual-citizenship-united-kingdom

British citizenship used to be for life - but a growing number of people are being stripped of their passports. BBC Radio 4's Law in Action programme investigates.
www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-politics-21783475


Under section 40 of the British Nationality Act 1981, as amended in 2006, the home secretary may make an order depriving a person of citizenship status if they are "satisfied that deprivation is conducive to the public good". No reasons need be given and no court approval is required.


As I understand it citizenship can be removed from naturalised citizens and those with dual nationalities. It can't be removed from someone who is British by birth and only British. Renoving their citizenship would nake them stateless which would be a breach of international law.
Accept nothing
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Offline Vertigo Swirl

Re: ISIS Brides, should they be allowed back ?
« Reply #22 on: February 18, 2019, 08:59:35 AM »
Making examples of people has never been shown to work, unfortunately. It's an empty threat anyway as British  born citizens can't be banished. She should be prosecuted if she's committed an offence and she should be closely monitored. The best outcome would be rehabilitation followed by her speaking out to advise others not to do as she did, She may be saying certain things at the moment to keep herself safe from retaliation.
What, like if she’d said she was disturbed at the sight of a head in a bin they’d retaliate? 

 I get the feeling that if I had made a post like yours above you would have found a reason to disagree with it.  Is running away to get married to an ISIS terrorist a criminal offence in this country?  Perhaps she should be tried in Syria where the offence was committed? 
"The answer is that no-one here believes the parents were directly involved in MM's disappearance" - G-Unit.

Online G-Unit

Re: ISIS Brides, should they be allowed back ?
« Reply #23 on: February 18, 2019, 09:10:59 AM »
What, like if she’d said she was disturbed at the sight of a head in a bin they’d retaliate? 

 I get the feeling that if I had made a post like yours above you would have found a reason to disagree with it.  Is running away to get married to an ISIS terrorist a criminal offence in this country?  Perhaps she should be tried in Syria where the offence was committed?

I expect there are ISIS people in that camp and it's not unreasonable to imagine they woouldn't take kindly to her speaking against them.

I don't know if it's against the law to do what she did, but if it is she will no doubt be prosecuted if she makes it back here.
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Offline Vertigo Swirl

Re: ISIS Brides, should they be allowed back ?
« Reply #24 on: February 18, 2019, 09:16:49 AM »
I expect there are ISIS people in that camp and it's not unreasonable to imagine they woouldn't take kindly to her speaking against them.

I don't know if it's against the law to do what she did, but if it is she will no doubt be prosecuted if she makes it back here.
She has made it plain it’s not much fun out there, the caliphate is over and she’s desperate to come home, but you don’t think the ISIS people would take issue with that?

And if she is prosecuted over here and found not guilty will that be ok with The Will Of The People?
"The answer is that no-one here believes the parents were directly involved in MM's disappearance" - G-Unit.

Offline Vertigo Swirl

Re: ISIS Brides, should they be allowed back ?
« Reply #25 on: February 18, 2019, 09:29:22 AM »
From today’s Times


A teenager caught as she headed to Syria to become a jihadist bride was never prosecuted despite police finding a cache of extremist material including plans of a key target for Islamic State, The Times can reveal.

The girl, 15, was hauled by police from a flight, which had been just about to take off from Heathrow in December 2014. She was one of five school-aged girls from Bethnal Green, east London, to attempt to join the terrorist group and the only one not to be successful.
"The answer is that no-one here believes the parents were directly involved in MM's disappearance" - G-Unit.

Offline John

Re: ISIS Brides, should they be allowed back ?
« Reply #26 on: February 18, 2019, 10:06:58 AM »
People with only British citizenship can't be stripped of their citizenship.

The thing is though, she voluntarily left the UK to join a terrorist State in the form of ISIS or Daesh.  Furthermore, as she joined our enemies during a state of war she has committed treason and is a traitor. I'm quite sure those who are supposed to run our justice department in Whitehall or wherever they hang out can work that one out for themselves or am I wrong?
A malicious prosecution for a crime which never existed. John Lamberton exposes malfeasance by public officials.
Check out my website >   http://johnlamberton.webs.com/index.htm?no_redirect=true     The truth never changes with the passage of time.

Online G-Unit

Re: ISIS Brides, should they be allowed back ?
« Reply #27 on: February 18, 2019, 10:11:06 AM »
She has made it plain it’s not much fun out there, the caliphate is over and she’s desperate to come home, but you don’t think the ISIS people would take issue with that?

And if she is prosecuted over here and found not guilty will that be ok with The Will Of The People?

As neither of us are there, we don't know, do we? All I said was that she may be being careful what she says avout them.

Decisions to prosecute and the outcome are matters of law, not of will.
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Offline John

Re: ISIS Brides, should they be allowed back ?
« Reply #28 on: February 18, 2019, 10:13:55 AM »
Perhaps we should put it to a national referendum,  I have a feeling I know which way the public would vote and then we would be morally obliged to carry out the will of the people.

We asked the question on twitter with this response by nearly 18,000 uses...

The UK government needs to be extremely careful how they respond in case they set the wrong preceded to others who will follow.  Are we really going to accept these individuals back with little or no consequences?
« Last Edit: February 18, 2019, 10:21:00 AM by John »
A malicious prosecution for a crime which never existed. John Lamberton exposes malfeasance by public officials.
Check out my website >   http://johnlamberton.webs.com/index.htm?no_redirect=true     The truth never changes with the passage of time.

Online Davel

Re: ISIS Brides, should they be allowed back ?
« Reply #29 on: February 18, 2019, 10:33:37 AM »
As I understand it citizenship can be removed from naturalised citizens and those with dual nationalities. It can't be removed from someone who is British by birth and only British. Renoving their citizenship would nake them stateless which would be a breach of international law.

 Citizenship can be removed make ng someone stateless as Ling as they are eligible to apply for citizenship of another country..
I would imagine her parents have, a nationality she would be entitled to... Her husband is dutch... She us eligible... So legally her citizenship can be removed
mods can delete posts but...
The moving finger writes and having writ moves on...
nor all thy piety nor wit can lure me back to alter but  a line..nor all thy tears wash away  a word of it