Author Topic: Why is Mitchell Guilty?  (Read 951 times)

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Re: Why is Mitchell Guilty?
« Reply #30 on: June 22, 2019, 08:35:14 AM »
Nicholas, why do you keep posting links and answering them by yourself?

Why don’t you stop spamming the thread and let some other people speak

Offline Nicholas

Re: Why is Mitchell Guilty?
« Reply #31 on: June 22, 2019, 06:26:35 PM »
Re Corrine Mitchell interview with James English

Is the person who allegedly confessed and was allegedly positively id’d the same person alluded to re an alleged punishment killing?


With regards the “punishment killing” theory this springs to mind



Apr 26 2010 By David Taylor
JODI JONES' killer Luke Mitchell has had DIY prison tattoos inked on his body - to count down the time he has spent behind bars.

Mitchell, who slaughtered Jodi, his 14-year-old girlfriend, in 2003 had tally marks etched on his stomach - and a skull emblem based on Marvel Comics vigilante The Punisher on his arm.

Now, 21, he had already been tattooed illegally before he was convicted of murder in 2005.

And the latest crude markings were put on his body by a fellow inmate using a home-made tattoo gun.

Last night, a source at Shotts Prison in Lanarkshire said: "Most people in here hope Mitchell has time to cover the rest of his body in tatts before he is allowed to walk free.

"Mitchell got the tally marks recently because that is almost six years he has been behind bars in total.

"So he could complete his first set, which has four vertical lines with a fifth drawn diagonally through it."

Mitchell was ordered to serve a minimum of 20 years for murdering Jodi.

The source added: "It's a bit strange that Mitchell is always protesting his innocence to anyone who will listen but then he gets a tattoo of a murdering torturer put on his arm."

Mitchell, from Dalkeith, Midlothian, had been acting as lookout for his crony as he tattooed other inmates, but decided to have a couple done himself.

Prison tattoo guns are made from a motor out of a tape or DVD player, a spoon handle, part of a biro pen and a guitar string.

The ink from a ballpoint pen and a needle from the prison's needle exchange are used to etch the designs on to skin.

In November, the Record revealed the craze for home-made tattoos in Shotts.

The Scottish Prison Service do not comment on individual prisoners

https://www.dailyrecord.co.uk/news/scottish-news/killer-luke-mitchell-jail-tattoos-1057307
A Lie Can Travel Halfway Around the World While the Truth Is Putting On Its Shoes

Offline Nicholas

Re: Why is Mitchell Guilty?
« Reply #32 on: June 22, 2019, 06:43:56 PM »
I found the “baby hedgehog” story interesting.

No idea how old Luke was when he and his Mum stayed up feeding the baby hedgehog every couple of hours but it’s what Corrine said about not “sugar coating the hedgehogs death - there was not going to be a happy ending etc.

Wonder what he learned from this experience?


The “poke it with a stick” comment made by Corrine Mitchell was interesting too



“Killer Luke Mitchell has penned a sinister threat to enemies - and stuck it on his cell wall.

In his poem, the murderer of 14-year-old Jodi Jones claims he's immortal, talks about drinking blood and vows to seek revenge on those who put him behind bars.

Part of the self-styled "prayer" is taken from the Bible's Psalm 23:4. But it is the rest of the rant which is most disturbing.

In the verse, he claims he will embrace evil and stab it with a "big f*****' stick".

Mitchell, now 21, was caged for killing then-girlfriend Jodi when they were just 14.

The tragic teen was found with her throat slashed in woods separating their family homes in Dalkeith, Midlothian, in 2003.

Mitchell has already blamed Jodi's family for his conviction. It remains unclear if his bizarre poem, entitled My Promise, is addressed to them or others he holds a grudge against.

Written on a sheet of A4 paper, the full passage states: "As I walk through the shadow of the valley of death, I will fear no evil, I will embrace and stab it with a big f*****' stick.

"I will watch it bleed, blood and life it took from me and others, and as I drink this life blood, I will regain my life and theirs.

"I will watch, as those who took so much from us spill their blood on the soil, for they will have no redemption, no mercy, for they gave none.

"I will watch as they wither and die, and I shall seek vengeance for those no longer capable.

"For I am immortal, I cannot die, not untill (sic) I have spilt the life blood of those who would spill mine."

A copy of the script, written in Mitchell's own hand, was passed to the Daily Record by a horrified source at maximum security Shotts prison, in Lanarkshire, where Mitchell is serving his sentence.

Our source at Shotts, which holds some of Scotland's most dangerous criminals, said: "Talking about seeking revenge, drinking blood and watching people wither and die is clearly not the kind of thoughts most decent people have.

"He has had the passage up on his cell wall. for some time and revels in quoting parts of it to his cronies. There is no doubt this is a threat to those he blames for sending him to prison for at least 20 years."

Last night, a leading psychologist slammed the poem as both disturbing and threatening, while showing no emotion for the victim.

Professor Paddy O'Donnell, deputy head of Glasgow University's department of psychology, said: "The emotional quality of the language is extremely high and it consists of a stream of very negative threatening words.

"Anyone reading that is going to feel disturbed and one of the purposes behind the poem is to disturb the reader.

"In that sense, the poem is intended as an aggressive communication rather than a cry for help or even an expression of anguish - it is essentially a long threat.

"It is not exactly a work of art because it uses quotations and quite repetitive imagery, so you are looking at a rather stilted and threatening communication without much in the way of creative novelty."

Professor O'Donnell said he felt the poem revealed Mitchel l to have a massive ego yet, even seven years after the atrocity, he cannot bring himself to accept any blame for the murder.

He added: "He uses quite a lot of biblical imagery which, evoked in the context of the threat, is meant to do two things.

"The first is that it makes the threat more, i n hi s eyes, awesome and inevitable, as he is calling on God as his right hand in this act of threat and vengeance, so it is to enforce the power of the threat.

"It's also an act of grandiosity in that he is taking on these almost supernatural powers, which indicate a massively inflated ego in the writer.

"Because God is on his side, it is a way of avoiding any acceptance of blame or responsibility on his part for anything that has happened. In other words, none of what has happened is his fault and none of what will happen if he acts out the act of vengeance will be his fault.

"It is a communication lacking in any sense of remorse or empathy for the victim of his offence or empathy for the people he is going to threaten or attack.

"Even if you were innocent you could still express empathy for the victim - although you weren't responsible, you would feel something, so there is absolutely no sense of empathy there.

"You are looking at a very narcissistic, grandiose ego with no sense of empathy and a great deal of aggression and resentment towards people he thinks as have wronged him."
A Lie Can Travel Halfway Around the World While the Truth Is Putting On Its Shoes

Offline Nicholas

Re: Why is Mitchell Guilty?
« Reply #33 on: June 22, 2019, 07:25:06 PM »
I’ll tell you who I think the confession is from - Steven Kelly.

If you read Sandra’s book and cross reference this with other sources, such as her comments, podcasts and news reports, you can sort of join the dots.  It doesn’t explicitly say that the confession was Steven Kelly, but you can do a bit of detective work after reading the chapter on Steven Kelly in the book, and also the chapter dedicated to the Stocky Man sighting.

There are certain indications in the way things are worded and suggested that they are, in my opinion, hinting to this.  There are a couple of things that make sense and add up.  It’s really complicated but you can form an opinion when you join the dots.

2010
THE MOTHER of Luke Mitchell is involved in an internet campaign blaming another man for Jodi Jones’ murder.
http://www.deadlinenews.co.uk/2010/06/20/mitchells-mum-points-finger-at-another-man-for-jodi-killing/
A Lie Can Travel Halfway Around the World While the Truth Is Putting On Its Shoes

Offline Nicholas

Re: Why is Mitchell Guilty?
« Reply #34 on: June 25, 2019, 12:05:25 AM »
Who is the person Corinne is referring to that apparently confessed and was following Jodi?

According to Corrine Mitchell the policeman who took the confession told Sandra Lean
A Lie Can Travel Halfway Around the World While the Truth Is Putting On Its Shoes

Offline Nicholas

Re: Why is Mitchell Guilty?
« Reply #35 on: July 04, 2019, 02:38:00 AM »
I found the “baby hedgehog” story interesting.

No idea how old Luke was when he and his Mum stayed up feeding the baby hedgehog every couple of hours but it’s what Corrine said about not “sugar coating the hedgehogs death - there was not going to be a happy ending etc.

Wonder what he learned from this experience?

Seems I’m not alone

Scott Mabon
@MrMabon11
·
3 Jun
Replying to
@jamesenglish0
 and
@ClarkoVanBastin
Talk us through that poor little hedgehog that was fed cows milk instead of goats milk??

https://mobile.twitter.com/jamesenglish0/status/1134560803376513024

Has anyone calculated how many minutes of Corrine Mitchell’s interview focused on unrelated and irrelevant story telling?
« Last Edit: July 04, 2019, 02:48:41 AM by Nicholas »
A Lie Can Travel Halfway Around the World While the Truth Is Putting On Its Shoes

Offline Nicholas

Re: Why is Mitchell Guilty?
« Reply #36 on: July 20, 2019, 04:12:26 PM »
https://www.heraldscotland.com/news/17769853.donald-findlay-qc-talks-distressing-toll-work/


Donald Findlay QC features in a new BBC Scotland show exploring those criminal cases which continue to fascinate us.
Crimes Files sees criminologist, Professor David Wilson, conduct in-depth investigations into both historic and contemporary crime cases as he interviews professionals who combat crime – high profile lawyers, pathologists, frontline police as well as some of the nation’s most notorious criminals.

https://scottishlegal.com/article/donald-findlay-qc-features-in-new-crime-show
« Last Edit: July 20, 2019, 04:29:46 PM by Nicholas »
A Lie Can Travel Halfway Around the World While the Truth Is Putting On Its Shoes

Offline Nicholas

Re: Why is Mitchell Guilty?
« Reply #37 on: August 13, 2019, 11:59:27 AM »
https://www.scotsman.com/news-2-15012/luke-mitchell-i-would-rather-stay-in-jail-than-admit-my-guilt-for-murder-of-jodi-jones-1-4800732

“I would rather stay in jail than admit MY guilt....” 

“When the jury visited the crime scene, I was told ‘stay flat and don’t react’- which probably didn’t help in their eyes.”
When he was convicted, Mitchell claims an order was given by the judge, to not show emotion upon the verdict: “I was in shock. The only reason I didn’t fall over was because I was gripping onto the railing in the dock so tightly.


Yet didn’t Sandra Lean state in her recent interview with James English that it was his lawyer?


Either way, if emotion existed for Luke Mitchell it would have come to the fore in some way; eg a tear or two.

Cannabis use linked to brutal teen violence
“Campaigners have called for a crackdown on cannabis after linking the drug to some of Scotland’s most notorious teenage killers in the wake of the conviction of a 16-year-old boy for the murder of Alesha MacPhail.
https://www.thetimes.co.uk/article/cannabis-use-linked-to-brutal-teen-violence-tkhnrmwpj
A Lie Can Travel Halfway Around the World While the Truth Is Putting On Its Shoes

Offline Parky41

Re: Why is Mitchell Guilty?
« Reply #38 on: August 13, 2019, 03:27:11 PM »
Quote
“I would rather stay in jail than admit MY guilt....”
[/color]

This statement from Luke evoked another reason from myself, rather than that of innocence.
 
Does he actually have that choice of confessing? He does of course, we all have choices-yet.

It is not only Luke whom this would effect but that of his mother - she has backed him to the hilt from day one.
I don't feel any-one else comes into the equation, by admitting his guilt, it would in turn be the downfall of his mother?
 

Offline Nicholas

Re: Why is Mitchell Guilty?
« Reply #39 on: August 13, 2019, 05:19:08 PM »
(


This statement from Luke evoked another reason from myself, rather than that of innocence.
 
Does he actually have that choice of confessing? He does of course, we all have choices-yet.

It is not only Luke whom this would effect but that of his mother - she has backed him to the hilt from day one.

I don't feel any-one else comes into the equation, by admitting his guilt, it would in turn be the downfall of his mother?

Do you not think he’s already succeeded in “the downfall” of his mother?
A Lie Can Travel Halfway Around the World While the Truth Is Putting On Its Shoes

Offline Parky41

Re: Why is Mitchell Guilty?
« Reply #40 on: August 14, 2019, 04:00:56 PM »
(
Do you not think he’s already succeeded in “the downfall” of his mother?

Quite, yes - would it be fair to assume that her life has picked up a little from the early years? No longer the same level of 'backlash' that she had to endure? She has of course undoubtedly, been downtrodden and permanently scarred from that very evening. One dares to imagine, how ones life could possibly become worse in this situation. Yet, a confession would undoubtedly, ignite these hot coals yet again.