Author Topic: Boris Johnson to shut down Parliament. Privy Council meet Queen at Balmoral.  (Read 10011 times)

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Offline Carana

Boris Johnson is planning to ask the Queen to suspend parliament ahead of a new Queen's Speech on 14 October, Sky sources have said.

A government source said the move was to help the new prime minister get on with implementing his domestic agenda.
https://news.sky.com/story/pm-boris-johnson-plans-to-ask-queen-to-suspend-parliament-from-mid-september-11795978

So... an unelected PM is apparently about to request the Queen to suspend Parliament...

What was that about "democracy" again? *%87

Offline Vertigo Swirl

Boris Johnson is planning to ask the Queen to suspend parliament ahead of a new Queen's Speech on 14 October, Sky sources have said.

A government source said the move was to help the new prime minister get on with implementing his domestic agenda.
https://news.sky.com/story/pm-boris-johnson-plans-to-ask-queen-to-suspend-parliament-from-mid-september-11795978

So... an unelected PM is apparently about to request the Queen to suspend Parliament...

What was that about "democracy" again? *%87
Hilariously I was listening to IDS on R4 denying the proroguation of Parliament five minutes before it was announced.  It triggered another Brexit row between me and my dear old mum (she initiated, as always!)
"The answer is that no-one here believes the parents were directly involved in MM's disappearance" - G-Unit.

Offline Vertigo Swirl

Boris does not have to call a general election until it suits him, he will time it so that parliament is suspended over the weeks leading up to  31st October sovthere can be no parliamentary opposition to a no deal Brexit.  Then, after the sunny uplands have been reached it will be election day and all the happy British people will vote for the Tories and he will go forward with a thumping majority, held aloft on a sedan chair made of gold.  That’s the theory anyway..
The first part of the plan has come into effect, as predicted.
"The answer is that no-one here believes the parents were directly involved in MM's disappearance" - G-Unit.

Offline G-Unit

Boris Johnson is planning to ask the Queen to suspend parliament ahead of a new Queen's Speech on 14 October, Sky sources have said.

A government source said the move was to help the new prime minister get on with implementing his domestic agenda.
https://news.sky.com/story/pm-boris-johnson-plans-to-ask-queen-to-suspend-parliament-from-mid-september-11795978

So... an unelected PM is apparently about to request the Queen to suspend Parliament...

What was that about "democracy" again? *%87

It is the elected Government making the request, not the PM. He was elected according to the democratic process set up by his party.

The Queen is often advised on these matters by the Privy Council. I wonder if she will look to them on this occasion?  They're a mixed bunch, but their President is Jacob Rees-Mogg.
Accept nothing
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Offline Baz

It is the elected Government making the request, not the PM. He was elected according to the democratic process set up by his party.

The Queen is often advised on these matters by the Privy Council. I wonder if she will look to them on this occasion?  They're a mixed bunch, but their President is Jacob Rees-Mogg.

The government is not elected. Parliament is the elected body.

So many people claim to want Brexit because of wanting "sovereignty" but are now applauding a PM and Government, that have not faced a general election, as they side step Parliament's rightful ability to effect the Brexit.


Offline G-Unit

The government is not elected. Parliament is the elected body.

So many people claim to want Brexit because of wanting "sovereignty" but are now applauding a PM and Government, that have not faced a general election, as they side step Parliament's rightful ability to effect the Brexit.

The party with the most votes in the last general election forms the government. That is the Conservative party. There is no requirement for a general election if a change in Prime Minister takes place.
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Offline Baz

The party with the most votes in the last general election forms the government. That is the Conservative party. There is no requirement for a general election if a change in Prime Minister takes place.

Exactly, a government is not elected.

There is no legal need for a general election when there is a change in PM. Agreed. I presume this is because there is a belief that a new party leader will be chosen and they will continue the work set out in the party's manifesto. So.... why the need for a new Queen's speech?

Offline G-Unit

Exactly, a government is not elected.

There is no legal need for a general election when there is a change in PM. Agreed. I presume this is because there is a belief that a new party leader will be chosen and they will continue the work set out in the party's manifesto. So.... why the need for a new Queen's speech?

Johnson says in order to set out his plans. There seems to have been a rumour that MP's might move to cancel the Autumn recess, which would be from mid-September until early October. This move adds 5 days to that recess.

We don't have a written Constitution, the country relies on precedent. There is precedent for Parliament to be porouged before a Queen's speech.

I find it quite amusing that those who have done everything in their power to prevent the people having what they voted for are now complaining that Johnson's government is robbing them of their constitutional and democratic rights.

Accept nothing
Believe no-one
Confirm everything

Offline Vertigo Swirl

Johnson says in order to set out his plans. There seems to have been a rumour that MP's might move to cancel the Autumn recess, which would be from mid-September until early October. This move adds 5 days to that recess.

We don't have a written Constitution, the country relies on precedent. There is precedent for Parliament to be porouged before a Queen's speech.

I find it quite amusing that those who have done everything in their power to prevent the people having what they voted for are now complaining that Johnson's government is robbing them of their constitutional and democratic rights.
Proroguing Parliament to deliberately prevent Parliament from having the opportunity to use legal and constitional process to delay or stop actions by Government that even their own advisors have admitted will be harmful to the country in numerous ways is undeniably undemocratic IMO.
"The answer is that no-one here believes the parents were directly involved in MM's disappearance" - G-Unit.

Offline Vertigo Swirl

Good ol’ sensible Daniel says it best -

Proroguing row: It’s rarely a good idea to unite your opponents like this
Daniel FinkelsteinAugust 28 2019, 1:20pm,
comment | daniel finkelstein

new

Is this a constitutional crisis? No. Might there be one? Yes. Is this a democratic and political crisis? Absolutely.

The British constitution, in so far as such a thing really exists, gives the executive a huge amount of political control over parliament, largely through its control of parliamentary time. The ability to choose the time of a Queen’s Speech is part of that power. In using it, the government is simply using its discretion. They are using their constitutional position to make life more difficult for those who oppose their policy.

But that is simply a formal view. We now have, effectively, a new government with a quite different policy to its predecessor. It is trying to reduce the amount of time parliament has to rule on whether it supports this new policy. In circumstances in which it seems overwhelmingly likely that it does not. So of course it is a democratic and political crisis.

Parliament will now struggle even harder to assert its control, perhaps through a no confidence vote or legal ways of forcing the government to act. The government may try to frustrate such manoeuvres — delaying an election, for instance until after Brexit, or refusing to seek an extension when mandated - and this would turn the political crisis into a constitutional one.

The fact that the government is able to use its power as it has done, does not make it wise or right to do so, of course.

In the short term, it is true, it is showing determination. It is signalling to the European Union that it cannot expect parliament to stop no deal, so the EU must come to terms. I doubt very much that this will happen, but the government disagrees and thinks there is a good chance if they are firm enough.

And they are also taking advantage of the weakness of their opponents. Unable to agree on how to replace the government, even for long enough to stop no deal, the alliance of remain parties needs to prise time out of this government’s hands in order to pass legislation. Naturally the government is trying to make this as difficult as possible.

They are entitled to point out that parliament has had at least a year to come forward with a policy and has not done so. While everyone is very keen that the Commons should assert its power, the truth is that the more it has asserted itself, the worse things have got. What did they think would happen?

Yet beyond the short run, it is rarely a good political idea to unite your opponents in righteous indignation. Fury may propel them to act together or encourage their supporters to vote together. It could produce an election, and one in which the Conservatives lose more through tactical voting than they gain from leave voters defecting from Labour.

It would also be one in which two central messages against Mr Corbyn — that he isn’t a proper parliamentary democrat and is excessively ideological — are instead turned against Mr Johnson.

Opposition unity might also make it easier for a non Tory coalition to be assembled after an election, whenever it comes, and one which decides on a policy of joining the customs union and the single market, making the no deal pointless.

It is also rarely a good idea to use parliamentary tactics in power that you would not wish to see used against you.

So the Conservative Party may regret later what is doing now, especially if no deal does not go as well as some members of the government expect. But such regret may take a while.

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"The answer is that no-one here believes the parents were directly involved in MM's disappearance" - G-Unit.

Offline Baz

Johnson says in order to set out his plans. There seems to have been a rumour that MP's might move to cancel the Autumn recess, which would be from mid-September until early October. This move adds 5 days to that recess.

We don't have a written Constitution, the country relies on precedent. There is precedent for Parliament to be porouged before a Queen's speech.

I find it quite amusing that those who have done everything in their power to prevent the people having what they voted for are now complaining that Johnson's government is robbing them of their constitutional and democratic rights.

There is a precedent for prorogation before a Queen's speech. Agreed. But for 5 weeks?? I disagree. Isn't it usually less than one week?

MPs have not just been elected to represent Leavers or to deal with Brexit. So by intentionally limiting their chance to debate and effect the final Brexit deal is absolutely "robbing them of their constitutional and democratic rights." He actually knows this and that is why he is claiming that the decision has nothing to do with Brexit. Which is an obvious lie... from our Prime Minister!

It is disgraceful and underhanded and totally in keeping with how we have ended up in this mess in the first place.

Offline Vertigo Swirl

Expect Hong Kong  style protests on the streets of London any day now.
"The answer is that no-one here believes the parents were directly involved in MM's disappearance" - G-Unit.

Offline John

Expect Hong Kong  style protests on the streets of London any day now.

Nah...can't see it.
A malicious prosecution for a crime which never existed and an exposé of egregious malfeasance by public officials.
The truth never changes with the passage of time.

Offline Vertigo Swirl

"The answer is that no-one here believes the parents were directly involved in MM's disappearance" - G-Unit.

Offline John

Boris Johnson is planning to ask the Queen to suspend parliament ahead of a new Queen's Speech on 14 October, Sky sources have said.

A government source said the move was to help the new prime minister get on with implementing his domestic agenda.
https://news.sky.com/story/pm-boris-johnson-plans-to-ask-queen-to-suspend-parliament-from-mid-september-11795978

So... an unelected PM is apparently about to request the Queen to suspend Parliament...

What was that about "democracy" again? *%87

Democracy went out the window the moment Parliament went against the Democratic will of the majority.  This is something Theresa May should have done long ago but she surrounded herself with backstabbers so was unable to carry it out.

Looking forward to Independence Day on Halloween!
A malicious prosecution for a crime which never existed and an exposé of egregious malfeasance by public officials.
The truth never changes with the passage of time.