Author Topic: Brexit from Irish perspective  (Read 1169 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline faithlilly

Re: Brexit from Irish perspective
« Reply #15 on: May 10, 2020, 03:34:48 PM »
Many, many years ago I had to point out to a rather racist radio presenter that Sikhs not Muslims wore turbans. In a multi-cultural society like ours you’d have thought that would have been common knowledge.

Offline Vertigo Swirl

Re: Brexit from Irish perspective
« Reply #16 on: May 10, 2020, 03:56:02 PM »
Afghanistan


Turbans are part of the national dress in Afghanistan. They are used more widely here than elsewhere in the Muslim world, and are worn in a wide range of styles and colours. In the country's south-east, turbans are wrapped loosely and largely, whereas in Kabul the garment tends to be smaller and tighter. In traditional Afghan society, a related piece of extra cloth called a patu serves practical purposes, such as for wrapping oneself against the cold, to sit on, to tie up an animal or to carry water in the cap. Different ethnic groups in Afghanistan wear different lungees with different patterns, way of styling it, fabric, stripes, lengths and colouration. Males of all ethnic backgrounds generally avoid wearing bright-coloured turbans that draw attention to oneself and prefer wearing simple colors that are white, off white, gray, dark blue and black
“we have carried out a very serious investigation and there is no indication whatsoever Madeleine McCann's parents are linked to her disappearance” - Hans Christian Wolters, German Prosecutor..

“Conspiracy theories exhibit a strong obsession with detail, often taking the form of highlighting a tiny piece of evidence and blowing it up out of all proportion, buttressing their claims with a display of pseudo-scholarship.  When they examine the real evidence, conspiracy theorists do not accept that minor inconsistencies come from mistakes in reporting.” Sir Richard J Evans, author and historian


Offline Vertigo Swirl

Re: Brexit from Irish perspective
« Reply #18 on: May 10, 2020, 04:43:25 PM »
I lived for many years in a Muslim country which had its fair share of Sikhs too.  The only men wearing turbans there were the Sikhs, my dad’s driver being one such.  The Muslims generally wore Songkoks, but only on special or formal occasions.  I really don’t need educating on the subject.  Turbans however, is a generic term for male headdress such as that worn by Osama Bin Laden and the Taliban, and by many other Muslim men throughout the world.  It is that to which I was referring, not the Sikh turban (also known as a Pagri or Dastar, more specifically), for anyone who though otherwise.  Hope that’s cleared up that little “misunderstanding “. 
“we have carried out a very serious investigation and there is no indication whatsoever Madeleine McCann's parents are linked to her disappearance” - Hans Christian Wolters, German Prosecutor..

“Conspiracy theories exhibit a strong obsession with detail, often taking the form of highlighting a tiny piece of evidence and blowing it up out of all proportion, buttressing their claims with a display of pseudo-scholarship.  When they examine the real evidence, conspiracy theorists do not accept that minor inconsistencies come from mistakes in reporting.” Sir Richard J Evans, author and historian

Offline faithlilly

Re: Brexit from Irish perspective
« Reply #19 on: May 10, 2020, 05:04:31 PM »
I lived for many years in a Muslim country which had its fair share of Sikhs too.  The only men wearing turbans there were the Sikhs, my dad’s driver being one such.  The Muslims generally wore Songkoks, but only on special or formal occasions.  I really don’t need educating on the subject.  Turbans however, is a generic term for male headdress such as that worn by Osama Bin Laden and the Taliban, and by many other Muslim men throughout the world.  It is that to which I was referring, not the Sikh turban (also known as a Pagri or Dastar, more specifically), for anyone who though otherwise.  Hope that’s cleared up that little “misunderstanding “.

Of course, of course.