Author Topic: Is Boris’s Lax Leadership Putting Us All in Danger ?  (Read 22074 times)

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Offline Miss Taken Identity

Re: Is Boris’s Lax Leadership Putting Us All in Danger ?
« Reply #960 on: June 28, 2020, 09:21:25 PM »
Guess it depends whether Johnson thinks he's been badly advised, all that fuss and bother about Cummings came to nowt though.


The civil service need a cull as far as I am concerned. It is filled with people who have been promoted beyond their capabilities. All about self promotion, huge egos...
'Never underestimate the power of stupid people'... George Carlin

Offline Carana

Re: Is Boris’s Lax Leadership Putting Us All in Danger ?
« Reply #961 on: July 01, 2020, 07:07:38 AM »

Theresa May makes rare intervention to slam Boris Johnson's security adviser hire
The former prime minister unleashes criticism on her successor's pick of David Frost - a political appointment.
Aubrey Allegretti, political reporter


Wednesday 1 July 2020 06:20, UK

 

Theresa May

May and Gove's frosty exchange


Theresa May has attacked Boris Johnson's choice to be his new national security adviser, saying he has "no proven expertise" in the area.

The former prime minister unleashed unusually strong criticism on her successor after Downing Street announced the PM would bring in his chief Brexit negotiator, David Frost, to take on the role of national security adviser.


Theresa May makes rare intervention to slam Boris Johnson's security adviser hire
The former prime minister unleashes criticism on her successor's pick of David Frost - a political appointment.
Aubrey Allegretti, political reporter
Aubrey Allegretti

Political reporter @breeallegretti

Wednesday 1 July 2020 06:20, UK

    Boris JohnsonMichael GoveTheresa May

Theresa May

May and Gove's frosty exchange



Theresa May has attacked Boris Johnson's choice to be his new national security adviser, saying he has "no proven expertise" in the area.

The former prime minister unleashed unusually strong criticism on her successor after Downing Street announced the PM would bring in his chief Brexit negotiator, David Frost, to take on the role of national security adviser.

Mr Frost will replace Sir Mark Sedwill, who is being let go from his senior roles as national security adviser and cabinet secretary from September.

The unusual move by Mr Johnson saw a politically-neutral civil servant replaced with a political adviser.

Mrs May did not hold back her criticism of the major Whitehall shakeup in the House of Commons on Tuesday.
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"I served on the National Security Council for nine years - six years as home secretary, and three as prime minister," she told MPs.

"During that time I listened to the expert independent advice from national security advisers."

Addressing Cabinet Office minister Michael Gove, she continued: "On Saturday, my right honourable friend said, 'We must be able to promote those with proven expertise'.

"Why then is the new national security adviser a political appointee with no proven expertise in national security?"

Mr Gove responded by paying tribute to Sir Mark's unusually short service at the top of the civil service.

He explained: "We have had previous national security advisers - all of them excellent, not all of them necessarily people who were steeped in the security world, some of them who were distinguished diplomats in their own right.

"Sir David - sorry David Frost - is a distinguished diplomat in his own right and it's entirely appropriate that the prime minister of the day should choose an adviser appropriate to the needs of the hour."

Lord Ricketts, the UK's first national security adviser, has also been less than positive about the appointment.

He said the role requires someone with "deep knowledge" but instead that Mr Johnson's priority is "not to expertise and experience, but to political loyalty among his closest advisers".

Mr Frost has had a rocketing ride through the civil service, having run the Scotch Whisky Association for two years until joining then-foreign secretary Mr Johnson as a special adviser from 2016 to 2018.

He was previously the UK's ambassador to Denmark and held diplomatic posts in Brussels with the European Union and in New York with the United Nations.

https://news.sky.com/story/theresa-may-makes-rare-intervention-to-slam-boris-johnsons-security-adviser-hire-12018181

Sounding more Trumpian by the day.

Has anyone come across the Russia report yet?


Offline faithlilly

Re: Is Boris’s Lax Leadership Putting Us All in Danger ?
« Reply #962 on: July 04, 2020, 11:24:29 AM »
A timely piece.

https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2020/jun/25/boris-johnson-britain-pub-dead-government-coronavirus


The Luftwaffe did not chalk up such a gruesome death toll. During the blitz, 43,000 civilians died, an average of 175 each day, a national trauma that is seared in Britain’s collective memory. In the past 100 days, the number of reported excess deaths linked to Covid-19 – which England’s chief medical officer, Chris Whitty, declares “the key metric” – has reached 65,700, a daily mortality rate far deadlier than the Nazi onslaught on British towns and cities between September 1940 and May 1941.

Inevitable is a word that can be used to describe the tragic fact that families were always going to “lose loved ones before their time”, as the prime minister put it 11 days before he belatedly ordered a national lockdown. It is not a word that can be used to describe one in every 1,000 members of the British public being killed by the virus in a three-month period, or what was at one point the second-worst death rate on earth. Scandalous? Yes. Criminal? Certainly. But inevitable? No.


If Boris Johnson has a trump card, a USP in politics, it is can-do, sunny optimism, an ability to dismiss and marginalise his critics as “doomsters” and “gloomsters”. It is our “patriotic duty” to visit the nation’s reopened pubs in a week and a half, he chirrups; “our long national hibernation” is coming to an end. His media outriders, too, hope that a cacophony of clinking beer glasses and flapping union jacks will drown out the dissenters. “SUMMER’S BACK ON!” bellows the Daily Mail as Britain’s national shutters come up. The Daily Express lauds the Dear Leader: “CHEERS BORIS! HERE’S TO A BRIGHTER BRITAIN.” “Our plan is working,” triumphantly declares the health secretary, Matt Hancock, as another 171 deaths are announced. With grinning declarations of victory, our rulers hope, we will all cheerfully shuffle into socially distanced pubs, sink our first freshly poured pints in over a hundred days, and let tens of thousands of fellow citizens who died needless deaths rest in peace.


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If Johnson and his allies get away with this national calamity, then the questions hovering over our democracy are troubling and grave. What does a government have to do to suffer adverse political consequences, if not violating its “first duty”, as Johnson once put it, “to protect the public in the most basic way” on an unprecedented scale in modern times? The reasons for this are tragically simple. Britain was an international outlier in its approach to the pandemic, and now stands in the top three (after Brazil and the US) for its death toll. If lockdown had been introduced even a week earlier, declared Prof Neil Ferguson, our pre-eminent epidemiologist, our death toll could have been halved. The delay was undoubtedly an “economy first” approach: how utterly self-destructive on its own terms, then, as allowing a graver pandemic inevitably led to a more protracted lockdown, leaving Britain possibly facing the worst economic hit of any developed nation.

Patients were released from hospitals into care homes without being tested for coronavirus, allowing the most vulnerable population in Britain to be seeded with a deadly pandemic. The consequences? Around one in 14 care home residents have died from this illness in around three and a half months: that statistic alone should haunt every government minister. The severity of our three combined national emergencies – public health, economic and social – was entirely self-inflicted by our own government.

The British public are neither stupid nor oblivious to the catastrophe: their rating of the government’s handling of the crisis is among the worst on earth. World-beating, indeed. But the scale of the criticisms does not match the scale of the disaster. While some journalists have fearlessly challenged the government’s failures – including at Newsnight and, two words I never imagined I would type, ITV’s Piers Morgan – the Pravda­-like qualities of much of the rightwing press has undoubtedly helped insulate Johnson’s administration.

There is another failing too. Several broadcast journalists express their fear that their industry has failed the public badly in the pandemic. “The media has badly messed up holding the government to account,” one broadcast journalist tells me, “because the priority has been to amplify ‘stay home and protect the NHS’ rather than scrutinising official failings.” It should have been science journalists challenging the government at the now abandoned daily press conferences – which became shams long ago – rather than political reporters. Politics is too often treated as a soap opera, a Westminster drama of who is up and who is down, and this crisis has been no exception.

The focus on the “pre-existing health conditions” of many who have died is another factor, too: many have interpreted this as meaning at “death’s door”, as the sad passing of those on the brink of dying anyway, unaware that millions of their fellow citizens qualify for this description. In the US, for example, it’s estimated that up to half the non-elderly population have pre-existing health conditions. According to a study in April, those dying from coronavirus are losing an average of 13 years of their lives. Coronavirus did not gently push the already flailing into their graves; it ruthlessly killed those who still had long to live.

Perhaps the government believes a summer of sunshine and beer will make us all forget: that a nation released from house arrest will embrace relief at a new present over a reckoning with the past. Johnson’s trademark combination of bluster and cheer will certainly aim to nurture this collective amnesia. But we should know this: if a government can get away with the avoidable deaths of tens of thousands of its own citizens, it can get away with anything and everything.

• Owen Jones is a Guardian columnist

Offline Carana

Re: Is Boris’s Lax Leadership Putting Us All in Danger ?
« Reply #963 on: July 05, 2020, 08:29:26 AM »
BoJo's dad on nipping off to Greece...

https://www.bbc.com/news/av/uk-53292142/coronavirus-uk-pm-s-father-says-he-hopes-for-air-bridge-with-greece

One can't be held accountable for the actions of family members, but I'd have thought that they'd realise that they are likely to be held to a greater level of scrutiny and accountability, particularly in the face of a plea for using common sense and personal responsibility.

PS: Before anyone has a go at me, I find Corbyn's brother totally bonkers.

Offline Miss Taken Identity

Re: Is Boris’s Lax Leadership Putting Us All in Danger ?
« Reply #964 on: July 05, 2020, 09:33:36 PM »
BoJo's dad on nipping off to Greece...

https://www.bbc.com/news/av/uk-53292142/coronavirus-uk-pm-s-father-says-he-hopes-for-air-bridge-with-greece

One can't be held accountable for the actions of family members, but I'd have thought that they'd realise that they are likely to be held to a greater level of scrutiny and accountability, particularly in the face of a plea for using common sense and personal responsibility.

PS: Before anyone has a go at me, I find Corbyn's brother totally bonkers.


Bojos dad like many business people are still flying -  his dad owns a cottage which he rents out and was getting it prepared.

But what a huge silence befell the  lefites- to the thousands who went on the rampage in London to 'protest' about defunding the police,ending capitalism- what will the bliars and welsh royalty Champaign socialist  crew k and hidden millions end up I wonder!
'Never underestimate the power of stupid people'... George Carlin

Offline Vertigo Swirl

Re: Is Boris’s Lax Leadership Putting Us All in Danger ?
« Reply #965 on: July 05, 2020, 11:12:24 PM »
BoJo's dad on nipping off to Greece...

https://www.bbc.com/news/av/uk-53292142/coronavirus-uk-pm-s-father-says-he-hopes-for-air-bridge-with-greece

One can't be held accountable for the actions of family members, but I'd have thought that they'd realise that they are likely to be held to a greater level of scrutiny and accountability, particularly in the face of a plea for using common sense and personal responsibility.

PS: Before anyone has a go at me, I find Corbyn's brother totally bonkers.
BoJo’s family all seem to go out of their way to undermine him at every opportunity.
“we have carried out a very serious investigation and there is no indication whatsoever Madeleine McCann's parents are linked to her disappearance” - Hans Christian Wolters, German Prosecutor..

“Conspiracy theories exhibit a strong obsession with detail, often taking the form of highlighting a tiny piece of evidence and blowing it up out of all proportion, buttressing their claims with a display of pseudo-scholarship.  When they examine the real evidence, conspiracy theorists do not accept that minor inconsistencies come from mistakes in reporting.” Sir Richard J Evans, author and historian

Offline faithlilly

Re: Is Boris’s Lax Leadership Putting Us All in Danger ?
« Reply #966 on: July 06, 2020, 03:44:45 PM »
BoJo's dad on nipping off to Greece...

https://www.bbc.com/news/av/uk-53292142/coronavirus-uk-pm-s-father-says-he-hopes-for-air-bridge-with-greece

One can't be held accountable for the actions of family members, but I'd have thought that they'd realise that they are likely to be held to a greater level of scrutiny and accountability, particularly in the face of a plea for using common sense and personal responsibility.

PS: Before anyone has a go at me, I find Corbyn's brother totally bonkers.

I agree the way Corbyn’s brother has acted in relation to Covid is bonkers.....and Stephen Kinnock et al.

Offline faithlilly

Re: Is Boris’s Lax Leadership Putting Us All in Danger ?
« Reply #967 on: July 07, 2020, 11:18:56 PM »
***RANT ALERT***

I am an NHS GP, and when a local school rang me as duty doctor for my 10,000 patients on Monday 24 February, to complain of a number of cases of a febrile illness, having returned 48 hours earlier from a half term ski trip to the Italian Alps - I suspected what we have come to know as Covid-19.

I declined them face to face appointments as we had no PPE, save for gloves. When central supplies did come, around a month later, they were expired “07/2016” and rebadged with a cheap sticker. And even then, all we got were some plastic pinnies and simple fluid repellent masks to last us about a week (when the WHO was advising FFP3 masks, visors, cuff covers and gowns). Batches of the rebadged masks were revealed last week to not be safe and practices advised to destroy them. But we had all used them up months ago. How many of us became unwell, and unwittingly passed on the virus to others? How many potentially died from that catastrophic failure to plan for the inevitable?

Even when, 20 years ago, as an undergraduate at UCL medical school, I had been taught by Prof Jim Ryan (Emeritus professor of conflict recovery). In a prescient day’s teaching in UCH ED, he had made us all wear PPE, and talked us through what we would need to do as frontline clinicians in a civilian emergency or global pandemic. He said these eventualities were as certain as cancer, heart attacks and strokes. Three years later he led the response at UCH during the 7/7 terrorist attacks and has been prominent throughout the WHO’s guidance on Covid-19. This should not have been a surprise. We had warning. We were lucky.

I’ve had the privilege to be in a leadership role for my profession for almost twenty years. I sat on the BMA’s UK GP committee during the 2009 H1N1 swine flu pandemic, and heard first hand then, how the medical profession liaised with public health, government and local authorities. How each winter we would plan for potential surges in excess mortality. Put aside stores of PPE and keep logistical plans on the shelf ready to be used out of the blue.

2020 has been starkly different to 2009. Years of austerity has cut any capacity there might have been in the NHS to rock bottom, systems are in deficit to the tunes of millions. As a GP, commissioners would like me and my colleagues to prescribe and investigate less, refer fewer, but see more patients and diagnose more cancer. Not an easy maths puzzle to solve.

Local authorities are in a parlous state, and we see that no more than in the multimorbid sequelae of those in poverty.
And what to bring on the UK after years of cuts to the public sector? The largest single episode of deliberate self harm that is Brexit.

Brexit prioritised politics over preparation. Those pandemic logistical action plans gathered dust. PPE allocations were swept aside as the country got itself in ever more debt, as a luxury we probably won’t need, so we probably shouldn’t bother with.

Public health has been decimated as a medical specialty over the past decade. Public Health England itself is a strange body that seemingly issues guidance but doesn’t have the mandate to ensure NHS England commissions it. And NHS England doesn’t have the funds to commission it. So it doesn’t. And public health is left in limbo - the hot potato thrown between EDs and general practice, when it belongs to neither, and neither are funded to provide it.

So when I declined to bring in the febrile ski trip that February morning, I called a panicked PHE for advice. We knew this was coming. We should have had ready stocks of PPE. We should have had notifiable illness algorithms to follow. We had neither.

In the absence of a reliable IgM diagnostic test we should have put in place a simple contract tracing policy. Contact tracing isn’t rocket science. It’s the preventative arm of every sexual health clinic in the world. It didn’t need to be difficult. It was bizarre to doctors that this wasn’t available.

In the absence of a reliable IgG antibody test, but knowing what we know about other family members of the coronaviridae, we should have put in place a policy of universal face mask use on public transport and in shops as far back as February. That ski trip returning from Italy should have had their temperature checked at Heathrow and been given advice as to what to do if they became unwell. Quarantine should have been enforced as it was for the Brits flown back from Wuhan. This isn’t the luxury of the retrospectoscope. Medical social media was alive with discussions and debates over these concerns as far back as February citing South Korea’s example.

I am privileged to be the GP who represents, supports and advises all the GPs and surgeries that care for the million patients across Cambridgeshire. In those early weeks the silence from government was deafening. My office issued practical advice on a weekly, if not daily basis to practices. We put in place a ‘No PPE No See’ policy on 10 March, rapidly transforming consultations to video and phone, undertaking essential emergency home visits in private PPE that GP organisations had sourced themselves at their own initial expense. Later on, government stated that they would refuse to reimburse any PPE that conferred ‘too much’ protection, only reimbursing the plastic pinnies, fluid repellent masks and gloves. Endless public goodwill came together to produce visors at cost price. Thank goodness for them. Three months on, despite promises from government, England’s GPs still haven’t received the essential Covid-19 Fund promised by the Treasury to cover additional costs for PPE, protective measures and staff costs. And we don’t like the look of winter.

And then it hit. And it was awful. Heartbreaking tragic stories have been shared across media. Those in caregiving roles will know of many more that didn’t reach print, but were no less painful, unfair and cruel. For some time it had been a worry about what would happen if and when outbreaks may take place in residential or nursing home settings. Some GP practices advised independent homes to put in place a lockdown prior to the government’s advice. In many cases, those decisions saved lives. But those care home staff (who often are on derisory contractual compensation for sickness absence) where was their PPE? Where was their ability to refuse known Covid positive patients into Covid negative care homes to clear those essential hospital beds for the next poor influx?

But it was ok! Because Boris Johnson clapped for us every Thursday. He doesn’t take the knee because he ‘doesn’t believe in gestures’ but he would happily clap for carers in front of cameras whilst scrapping those nurse bursaries which later had to be embarrassingly reinstated. And the public have generously donated over £130 million to a charity that will only give your little area of the NHS money if you pay their £1000/year membership fee. Which might be ok for those big hospitals and trusts, but no use to your local surgery, GP or independent community pharmacy. Anyway, at least we are led by a government following its own orders....

The Cummins affair made a mockery of the public health messages and were a grave misjudgement by a man who allegedly prides himself on being able to take the temperature of the nation. I hope the nation returns the sleight at the ballot box. But we get what we vote for, and Britain voted in December for a craven cabinet of sycophants who were prized only for their ability to nod their heads in unison to the leader’s latest ‘oven ready’ glib strapline.

In identifying where the government have gone wrong, it’s a struggle to understand where they have gone right?

Many of us GPs are now looking to Autumn and Winter with dread. To rolling out a socially distanced seasonal flu vaccination programme. We are trying to plan for how we can safely vaccinate the largest number. No sign of an SOP from NHS England as yet, of course. A government that refers to ‘Super Saturday’ clearly hasn’t thought enough about the other very real prospect of a novel pandemic influenza strain. It’s overdue.

But it probably won’t be this year, so let’s not worry about it eh? What’s the worst that can happen?

Erratum: @DrMikeRyan is far too young to have taught me 20 years ago! My mistake - I mean another Prof Ryan trauma surgery graduate from @ucddublin! The superlative Professor Jim Ryan - www.linkedin.com/in/jim-ryan-50719171


Offline Miss Taken Identity

Re: Is Boris’s Lax Leadership Putting Us All in Danger ?
« Reply #969 on: July 11, 2020, 09:13:46 PM »
https://news.sky.com/story/coronavirus-the-inside-story-of-how-uks-chaotic-testing-regime-broke-all-the-rules-12022566


What you fail to comprehend is BOJO is not a doctor, or a NHS manager, or owner of IT systems OR an NHS procurement supplier.  Who should have done their jobs! The money was handed over to organisations/staff  - people who re paid to arrange these things- WHY do you think we need to change the way things are done?  it is the same with the Army- sent to fight without proper equipment.

People are in jobs where they are punching above their weight. we need look no further than the 'corporate nurses' moved from hospitals to the community and leaving auxiliary staff to do the 'nursing' in hospitals then we are told we need to bring people in from abroad to do the nursing.  Yeah go figure...
'Never underestimate the power of stupid people'... George Carlin

Offline faithlilly

Re: Is Boris’s Lax Leadership Putting Us All in Danger ?
« Reply #970 on: July 12, 2020, 03:24:49 PM »

What you fail to comprehend is BOJO is not a doctor, or a NHS manager, or owner of IT systems OR an NHS procurement supplier.  Who should have done their jobs! The money was handed over to organisations/staff  - people who re paid to arrange these things- WHY do you think we need to change the way things are done?  it is the same with the Army- sent to fight without proper equipment.

People are in jobs where they are punching above their weight. we need look no further than the 'corporate nurses' moved from hospitals to the community and leaving auxiliary staff to do the 'nursing' in hospitals then we are told we need to bring people in from abroad to do the nursing.  Yeah go figure...

The buck stops with the government.

I hear that some of the relatives of the Covid dead are marching on Downing Street to demand an inquiry.

Offline Miss Taken Identity

Re: Is Boris’s Lax Leadership Putting Us All in Danger ?
« Reply #971 on: July 12, 2020, 10:10:40 PM »
The buck stops with the government.

I hear that some of the relatives of the Covid dead are marching on Downing Street to demand an inquiry.


We obviously went to different schools with a different education. This is how I was taught about government and got an A for my essay on the subject.

The Government are a group of people elected to represent the MAJORITY of the population who are entitled to vote. The UK have a party first past the post system.
The 'parties' set out an agenda and people vote according to their preferred choice.  Once there is a mandate assured from the majority voted- the government set about putting them in place.
The people who actually put them in place are civil servants. So It is the civil servants to actually run the country!

As we saw with Brexit civil servants tried to fight against it including the speaker of the house of commons at that time. They have no right to go against the wishes of the people. I used Brexit as a reference, but there are a great many other things civil servants have been doing. They are SERVANTS they serve the people via Government who elected them!

So when you say the buck stops at the Government you are wrong!
'Never underestimate the power of stupid people'... George Carlin

Offline faithlilly

Re: Is Boris’s Lax Leadership Putting Us All in Danger ?
« Reply #972 on: July 13, 2020, 12:30:47 AM »

We obviously went to different schools with a different education. This is how I was taught about government and got an A for my essay on the subject.

The Government are a group of people elected to represent the MAJORITY of the population who are entitled to vote. The UK have a party first past the post system.
The 'parties' set out an agenda and people vote according to their preferred choice.  Once there is a mandate assured from the majority voted- the government set about putting them in place.
The people who actually put them in place are civil servants. So It is the civil servants to actually run the country!

As we saw with Brexit civil servants tried to fight against it including the speaker of the house of commons at that time. They have no right to go against the wishes of the people. I used Brexit as a reference, but there are a great many other things civil servants have been doing. They are SERVANTS they serve the people via Government who elected them!

So when you say the buck stops at the Government you are wrong!

I would have hoped your understanding of how the country is governed would have developed and be rather more sophisticated and nuanced than at 16...obviously not.

Offline Miss Taken Identity

Re: Is Boris’s Lax Leadership Putting Us All in Danger ?
« Reply #973 on: July 13, 2020, 11:21:41 AM »
I would have hoped your understanding of how the country is governed would have developed and be rather more sophisticated and nuanced than at 16...obviously not.

Can you please put me right, me being all ignorant about Government and how it is run. Thanks.


To other members, who don't have claws pointing in my direction, and  have a better understanding of how government  DOES work, please feel free to advise others about how civil servants are appointed and how the government departments operate- each have a MP who is appointed minister to the cabinet (top dogs). Top dogs report to PM to ensure policy is being carried out.  In the event of a real fkup civil servants and MPS can be called to account, via select committees, there are also public inquiries and Parliamentary committees.

I do not recall the prime minister of the day being held to account for the 'Baby P' horror story. AND don't even think that is a one off either, because it isn't!

The very Idea that one person is responsible for everything is so funny that people believe that. @)(++(*


 BOJO is NOT a dictator- he is accountable- if he is given the wrong information and acts upon it he isn't sent to the gallows as some would like.
'Never underestimate the power of stupid people'... George Carlin

Offline faithlilly

Re: Is Boris’s Lax Leadership Putting Us All in Danger ?
« Reply #974 on: July 13, 2020, 12:29:37 PM »
Can you please put me right, me being all ignorant about Government and how it is run. Thanks.


To other members, who don't have claws pointing in my direction, and  have a better understanding of how government  DOES work, please feel free to advise others about how civil servants are appointed and how the government departments operate- each have a MP who is appointed minister to the cabinet (top dogs). Top dogs report to PM to ensure policy is being carried out.  In the event of a real fkup civil servants and MPS can be called to account, via select committees, there are also public inquiries and Parliamentary committees.

I do not recall the prime minister of the day being held to account for the 'Baby P' horror story. AND don't even think that is a one off either, because it isn't!

The very Idea that one person is responsible for everything is so funny that people believe that. @)(++(*


 BOJO is NOT a dictator- he is accountable- if he is given the wrong information and acts upon it he isn't sent to the gallows as some would like.

Oh to be so innocent....I do envy you sometimes MTI.