Author Topic: The government doesn't want the public to have Covid-19 home test kits!  (Read 2043 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline John

It has been brought to my attention that some posters are still using inappropriate comments and remarks towards other members on the boards. Forum rules dictate that all responses should be amicable and constructive, there is no need to express any opinion or respond to any question aggressively.

Please keep this in mind guys when posting. TY
A malicious prosecution for a crime which never existed. An exposé of egregious malfeasance by public officials.
Indeed, the truth never changes with the passage of time.

Offline Robittybob1

  • Moderator
  • Veteran Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 23387
  • Total likes: 3821
  • Wisdom and understanding please.
    • The Lord Jesus - search for Madeleine McCann
She is one remarkable person.   In the beginning, I thought she had locked the country down too early, as I imagined they were hoping for a controlled rate of spread of the virus through the population.   But now they have basically eliminated the virus from the country. 
OK so now we have 5 million people in desperate need of a working vaccine.  When will the vaccine come? How likely will NZ be on the priority list?
I feel we will be waiting a long time.

Long before Covid 19 appeared on the scene I had developed the concept of using sub minimal infective doses of a disease to develop immunity.
So from what I've heard Covid 19 has a "minimal infective dose" of 1000 virus particles.

Therefore if it was possible to count the number of virus particles in a dose if we were to take a dose close to the minimal infective dose our bodies would develop immunity but we would remain without symptoms.

OK, I believe this would have to be applied in an isolated situation for I'm sure these people would still be spreading the disease, so they need to be isolated till they were noninfectious (approx 2-3 weeks).

I have written to the Director-General of Health regarding this proposal but I never got a reply.
As far as I know, no one else is using the minimal infective dose as a control method so there isn't an article backing my idea as yet.  https://www.newscientist.com/article/2238819-does-a-high-viral-load-or-infectious-dose-make-covid-19-worse/

https://youtu.be/vrL9QKGQrWk  A German virologist who is hypothesizing using low doses of the virus to get immunity in the population.  "German virologist: Covid-19 is less deadly than we thought"

Worth thinking about.   
Moderation
John has instructed all moderators to take a very strong line with posters who constantly breach the rules of this forum.  This sniping, goading, name calling and other various forms of disruption will cease.

Offline Carana

TBH, I wouldn't particularly like to spend 6 weeks intubated on my tummy because of some virologist's "hypothesis".

I have been wondering for some time whether a tiny (inadvertent) dose would gradually build antibodies or not.

Two problems with that: most experts are warning that at the moment there is no proof that the presence of antibodies equates to immunity, and (my own concern) is whether a small build-up of the virus could end up with an overload. The triggering thought was that, e.g., a shopper is apparently likely to receive a smaller dose than a cashier in front of numerous customers per day.

Offline Davel

TBH, I wouldn't particularly like to spend 6 weeks intubated on my tummy because of some virologist's "hypothesis".

I have been wondering for some time whether a tiny (inadvertent) dose would gradually build antibodies or not.

Two problems with that: most experts are warning that at the moment there is no proof that the presence of antibodies equates to immunity, and (my own concern) is whether a small build-up of the virus could end up with an overload. The triggering thought was that, e.g., a shopper is apparently likely to receive a smaller dose than a cashier in front of numerous customers per day.

Just because there is no proof doesnt mean its unlikely that infection results in immunity. it may well do but it would need a scientific study to prove it. Then there may not be permanent immunity......but perhaps a couple of years with reinfection after that but not severe....or reinfection that is worse than the original...like dengue fever.

Theres such a lot that simply isnt known because its  a new virus.
Then...how likely or unlikely is it that  a new..new virus could come along.
Master of Pinteresque Pauses

Offline Robittybob1

  • Moderator
  • Veteran Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 23387
  • Total likes: 3821
  • Wisdom and understanding please.
    • The Lord Jesus - search for Madeleine McCann
Just because there is no proof doesnt mean its unlikely that infection results in immunity. it may well do but it would need a scientific study to prove it. Then there may not be permanent immunity......but perhaps a couple of years with reinfection after that but not severe....or reinfection that is worse than the original...like dengue fever.

Theres such a lot that simply isnt known because its  a new virus.
Then...how likely or unlikely is it that  a new..new virus could come along.
I'm going to have to refresh as to what happens with Dengue Fever.

Look the same problem might happen after a Covid 19 vaccine, could it make reinfection worse than the original?
Moderation
John has instructed all moderators to take a very strong line with posters who constantly breach the rules of this forum.  This sniping, goading, name calling and other various forms of disruption will cease.

Offline Carana

Just because there is no proof doesnt mean its unlikely that infection results in immunity. it may well do but it would need a scientific study to prove it. Then there may not be permanent immunity......but perhaps a couple of years with reinfection after that but not severe....or reinfection that is worse than the original...like dengue fever.

Theres such a lot that simply isnt known because its  a new virus.
Then...how likely or unlikely is it that  a new..new virus could come along.

Yes, that's what I'm wondering.

Dengue Hemorrhagic Fever

The risk factors for developing dengue hemorrhagic fever include:

    having antibodies to dengue virus from a previous infection

    being under the age of 12
    being female
    weakened immune system
https://www.healthline.com/health/dengue-fever#complications

Offline Robittybob1

  • Moderator
  • Veteran Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 23387
  • Total likes: 3821
  • Wisdom and understanding please.
    • The Lord Jesus - search for Madeleine McCann
I'm going to have to refresh as to what happens with Dengue Fever.

Look the same problem might happen after a Covid 19 vaccine, could it make reinfection worse than the original?

They say SARS Cov II virus originated in bats but the genetic difference is quite substantial.   I'm now wondering if a human that had both Dengue fever and a bat virus simultaneously allowed recombination of the genome to produce the SARS Cov II virus to form.
Moderation
John has instructed all moderators to take a very strong line with posters who constantly breach the rules of this forum.  This sniping, goading, name calling and other various forms of disruption will cease.

Offline Carana

From  what I've read, the genome fits well with a certain type of bat, but may have passed it to an intermediate animal (armadillo or some other type). Not clear yet.


Offline Robittybob1

  • Moderator
  • Veteran Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 23387
  • Total likes: 3821
  • Wisdom and understanding please.
    • The Lord Jesus - search for Madeleine McCann
From  what I've read, the genome fits well with a certain type of bat, but may have passed it to an intermediate animal (armadillo or some other type). Not clear yet.

Abstract: "The origin of the severe acute respiratory syndrome‐coronavirus (SARS‐CoV) remains unclear. Evidence based on Bayesian scanning plots and phylogenetic analysis using maximum likelihood (ML) and Bayesian methods indicates that SARS‐CoV, for the largest part of the genome (∼80%), is more closely related to Group II coronaviruses sequences, whereas in three regions in the ORF1ab gene it shows no apparent similarity to any of the previously characterized groups of coronaviruses. There is discordant phylogenetic clustering of SARS‐CoV and coronaviruses sequences, throughout the genome, compatible with either ancient recombination events or altered evolutionary rates in different lineages, or a combination of both. J. Med. Virol. 74:369–372, 2004. © 2004 Wiley‐Liss, Inc."
https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1002/jmv.20187

Has the Dengue virus been sequenced?
Moderation
John has instructed all moderators to take a very strong line with posters who constantly breach the rules of this forum.  This sniping, goading, name calling and other various forms of disruption will cease.

Offline Robittybob1

  • Moderator
  • Veteran Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 23387
  • Total likes: 3821
  • Wisdom and understanding please.
    • The Lord Jesus - search for Madeleine McCann
"Dengue fever and COVID-19 are difficult to distinguish because they share clinical and laboratory features [3]. Some authors described cases who were wrongly diagnosed as dengue but later confirmed to be COVID-19 [4]. Besides, co-infections with arboviruses and SARS-CoV-2 have not been well studied." 

OK it is a long shot but could the similarity be due to the combination of the two viruses SARs and Dengue?
Moderation
John has instructed all moderators to take a very strong line with posters who constantly breach the rules of this forum.  This sniping, goading, name calling and other various forms of disruption will cease.

Offline Carana

"Dengue fever and COVID-19 are difficult to distinguish because they share clinical and laboratory features [3]. Some authors described cases who were wrongly diagnosed as dengue but later confirmed to be COVID-19 [4]. Besides, co-infections with arboviruses and SARS-CoV-2 have not been well studied." 

OK it is a long shot but could the similarity be due to the combination of the two viruses SARs and Dengue?

The original Wuhan one mutated. In one of his pressers, Andrew Cuomo pointed out that the strain in California was different to the one on the east coast.

The west coast one may well have come directly from China (shorter flying time, immigrant Chinese population...) and Cuomo said the one on the east coast came from Europe. Seems likely it mutated at some point over there.

There's a third strain, but I can't find the article for the mo.

Re dengue fever, Dr Fauci said the Covid-19 couldn't be transmitted by mosquitoes. It doesn't appear to be related to the coronaviruses, either.

Offline Robittybob1

  • Moderator
  • Veteran Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 23387
  • Total likes: 3821
  • Wisdom and understanding please.
    • The Lord Jesus - search for Madeleine McCann
The original Wuhan one mutated. In one of his pressers, Andrew Cuomo pointed out that the strain in California was different to the one on the east coast.

The west coast one may well have come directly from China (shorter flying time, immigrant Chinese population...) and Cuomo said the one on the east coast came from Europe. Seems likely it mutated at some point over there.

There's a third strain, but I can't find the article for the mo.

Re dengue fever, Dr Fauci said the Covid-19 couldn't be transmitted by mosquitoes. It doesn't appear to be related to the coronaviruses, either.
When they are talking about different strains the difference is relatively minor, a couple of base differences.

Has the virus got 29904 bases?  So Covid 19 virus differs by around 5980 bases compared to the original bat virus it may be related to.   
Why is Dengue only transmitted by certain types of mosquitoes?  Covid 19 virus can infect the eyes and I've noticed some houseflies have a habit of landing on one's eye.  So I wouldn't reject the idea that Covid 19 isn't transmitted by flies.

"How does an Aedes aegypti mosquito become a dengue vector? After a mosquito feeds on the blood of someone infected with the dengue virus, that mosquito becomes a dengue vector. The mosquito must take its blood meal during the period of viremia, when the infected person has high levels of the dengue virus in the blood. Once the virus enters the mosquito's system in the blood meal, the virus spreads through the mosquito's body over a period of eight to twelve days. After this period, the infected mosquito can transmit the dengue virus to another person while feeding. Does a mosquito infected with the dengue virus only transmit the virus to the next person it feeds on? No, once infected with dengue, the mosquito will remain infected with the virus for its entire life. Infected mosquitoes can continue transmitting the dengue virus to healthy people for the rest of their life spans, generally a three- to four-week period."  https://www.nature.com/scitable/topicpage/dengue-transmission-22399758/


So the virus infects humans and some species of mosquitoes.
« Last Edit: May 22, 2020, 12:34:30 PM by Robittybob1 »
Moderation
John has instructed all moderators to take a very strong line with posters who constantly breach the rules of this forum.  This sniping, goading, name calling and other various forms of disruption will cease.