Author Topic: The Government's mishandling of the Covid-19 epidemic.  (Read 1779 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline APRIL

Re: The Government's mishandling of the Covid-19 epidemic.
« Reply #45 on: June 09, 2020, 01:36:51 PM »
What are peoples' feelings about the guidance we've been given. Is it right that there have been loopholes, as in, we should apply our common sense, OR should there have been hard and fast rules with attached penalties if broken?

Offline mrswah

  • Senior Moderator
  • Sr. Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1719
  • Total likes: 652
  • Thinking outside the box, as usual-------
Re: The Government's mishandling of the Covid-19 epidemic.
« Reply #46 on: June 09, 2020, 05:13:42 PM »
What are peoples' feelings about the guidance we've been given. Is it right that there have been loopholes, as in, we should apply our common sense, OR should there have been hard and fast rules with attached penalties if broken?

Well, I would prefer to be left to use my common sense, and I think my only breach of the rules was taking the dog out more than once a day, which caused nobody any harm, since I could easily complete two dog walks without seeing anyone (it's very different now).   However, a number of people cannot be trusted to behave sensibly, eg those who were caught jumping off Durdle Door a couple of weeks ago.  So, as much as it pains me (I am more of a libertarian than I thought I was), I have to conclude that we probably did need hard rules and hard penalties.

I think the politicians also need to use their common sense.  I'm assuming the objective was to prevent contact between people. Where I live, it is far easier to avoid that than it is in a city centre, so a "blanket rule" for every part of the country  was inappropriate.   Same with that ghastly proposal (fortunately, never implemented) that anyone over 70 shouldnt leave home, when some over 70s are very fit for their age, and some  still go to  work.

My main worry about this lockdown is that I suspect we now have a fair number of people (of all ages), who believe that , if they step outside their front door, they stand a good chance of dying.




Offline APRIL

Re: The Government's mishandling of the Covid-19 epidemic.
« Reply #47 on: June 09, 2020, 05:55:37 PM »
Well, I would prefer to be left to use my common sense, and I think my only breach of the rules was taking the dog out more than once a day, which caused nobody any harm, since I could easily complete two dog walks without seeing anyone (it's very different now).   However, a number of people cannot be trusted to behave sensibly, eg those who were caught jumping off Durdle Door a couple of weeks ago.  So, as much as it pains me (I am more of a libertarian than I thought I was), I have to conclude that we probably did need hard rules and hard penalties.

I think the politicians also need to use their common sense.  I'm assuming the objective was to prevent contact between people. Where I live, it is far easier to avoid that than it is in a city centre, so a "blanket rule" for every part of the country  was inappropriate.   Same with that ghastly proposal (fortunately, never implemented) that anyone over 70 shouldnt leave home, when some over 70s are very fit for their age, and some  still go to  work.

My main worry about this lockdown is that I suspect we now have a fair number of people (of all ages), who believe that , if they step outside their front door, they stand a good chance of dying.


Mrswah, you've clearly thought about that response AND employed a common sense which seems to run parallel with my own. There's little more I can add.

Like you, I'm concerned that there will be those who never set foot outside their doors again. Covid grips in more ways than one and I feel certain that mental health services will be overrun, when this is over, with those who are suffering.

Offline mrswah

  • Senior Moderator
  • Sr. Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1719
  • Total likes: 652
  • Thinking outside the box, as usual-------
Re: The Government's mishandling of the Covid-19 epidemic.
« Reply #48 on: June 09, 2020, 07:12:47 PM »

Mrswah, you've clearly thought about that response AND employed a common sense which seems to run parallel with my own. There's little more I can add.

Like you, I'm concerned that there will be those who never set foot outside their doors again. Covid grips in more ways than one and I feel certain that mental health services will be overrun, when this is over, with those who are suffering.

So, how do you feel about the rules, April?

I hope some more people are going to post-----I'm interested!

Offline APRIL

Re: The Government's mishandling of the Covid-19 epidemic.
« Reply #49 on: June 09, 2020, 07:39:48 PM »
So, how do you feel about the rules, April?

I hope some more people are going to post-----I'm interested!



Mrswah, I can only speak for myself, of course. I'm not a natural rule-breaker -although I can't say that I wouldn't 'fudge' them a little- so I'd follow 99% of them. That's not to say I wouldn't grizzle, mind you, but I think I'd feel more guilty about passing it on, than worried about catching it. (that could be the subject of an interesting poll)

I can't imagine "they" didn't take on board that not everyone would stick to the rules. I'm guessing they relied on enough people like me sticking to them to redress the balance.

Offline Carana

Re: The Government's mishandling of the Covid-19 epidemic.
« Reply #50 on: August 03, 2020, 11:09:14 PM »
An example of why I thought it mad not to ask for an extension...

The government has written to to medicine suppliers urging them to stockpile drugs for a possible no-deal in EU trade talks at the end of the year – after firms warned that this may not be possible because of the pandemic.

In a letter made public on Monday officials at the health department said the government recognises “that global supply chains are under significant pressure” because of coronavirus, but said the expensive precaution was still necessary.

In June a pharmaceutical industry memo said original stockpiles meant for no deal had been “used up entirely” and that it might not be possible to replenish them before December, when the UK is due to leave the single market.

Boris Johnson refused to extend the Brexit transition period last month despite disruption caused by coronavirus and the fact the UK is facing a cliff edge at the end of the year.

Flagging trade talks mean it is increasingly likely that Britain will leave the single market without any trade agreement at all, with disruption to trade and supply chains expected.

More here:

https://www.independent.co.uk/news/uk/politics/coronavirus-no-deal-brexit-government-medicine-stockpiling-a9651991.html