Author Topic: New South Wales toddler William Tyrrell, 3, still missing  (Read 57390 times)

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Offline pathfinder73

Re: New South Wales toddler William Tyrrell, 3, still missing
« Reply #180 on: June 29, 2018, 08:07:27 PM »
Hi Misty, I always thought he was hidden closer to home and possibly moved later.

New lead as second William Tyrrell search finishes

Detectives searching for William Tyrrell have uncovered new information as they wrap up a targeted search of bushland near the NSW mid-north coast town of Kendall.

Search teams and cadaver dogs will now return to the main, larger search area near William's grandmother's home from where the toddler disappeared in September 2014.

The tiny community has been urged to cast a suspicious eye over family members,
friends and neighbours as pressure mounts to solve the mystery.

Detective Chief Inspector Gary Jubelin earlier this week announced the investigation had zoned in on a second small patch of bushland about four kilometres from the home.

On Friday he confirmed police had completed the second search at Batar Creek without finding specific evidence - but new leads had emerged.

"While we have not located evidence of William being in this location, investigators have gained information from the search," he said in a statement.

AAP understands the new information did not come from within the search zone itself but was uncovered in the last few days. It was not a tip-off from the public.

The swarming police presence around the town is designed to put "pressure" on a person in the Kendall surrounds who has held back information from investigators.

"There is a person out there who knows why we are searching this area and will no doubt be feeling pressure from the intensity of the investigation," Det Insp Jubelin said.

He urged people to be aware of other peoples' behaviour in case they begin to crack under the scrutiny.

"I would encourage them to come forward with any information they have - William's family need answers as to what happened to their little boy."

The main search is expected to last for another week and a half.

https://www.sbs.com.au/news/new-lead-as-second-william-tyrrell-search-finishes
Smithman carrying a child in his arms checked his watch after passing the Smith family and the time was 10:03. Both are still unidentified 10 years later.

Offline misty

Re: New South Wales toddler William Tyrrell, 3, still missing
« Reply #181 on: September 13, 2018, 02:15:37 AM »
https://www.news.com.au/national/nsw-act/burntout-car-linked-to-william-tyrrell-mystery/news-story/ab100ae039c70e2820ed3bb91dd396cc

INVESTIGATORS say a burnt-out car abandoned deep in the bush near where William Tyrrell went missing could be a breakthrough in the case of the missing NSW boy.

The wreck was discovered in the bushland surrounding Kendall on the NSW mid-north coast, just a short drive from the home of William’s foster grandmother, where he disappeared from on September 12, 2014.

It is believed the vehicle belonged to Tony Jones, a convicted paedophile who was at one point a person of interest in the little boy’s disappearance, Nine’s A Current Affair reports.

He was released from prison in January after serving a sentence for child molesting.

Mr Jones, aged in his 60s, was involved in a heated confrontation with ACA earlier this year. He has previously denied any involvement in the three-year-old’s alleged kidnapping and has not been charged over it.

Police received a tip-off regarding the abandoned, rusty car hidden in the bush, however once they arrived at the scene, they discovered the vehicle had been flipped and set alight.

The abandoned vehicle resembled the same make and model Mr Jones used to drive, according to the person who discovered it.

His relative Katrina, who had been living with Mr Jones at the time William vanished, told ACA that she would “not be surprised” if he was the owner of the car.

Mr Jones put forward several conflicting alibis when interviewed by ACA earlier this year, telling the program he was helping with his neighbour’s hot water system when William disappeared, but the neighbour later disputed this claim.

The relative said Mr Jones was in the bush collecting scrap metal at the time, while Mr Jones told another source he was out using a chainsaw he had borrowed from the local council.

In 2015, Mr Jones was convicted and sentenced for the aggravated indecent assault of an 11-year-old girl. He was sentenced to a maximum three years in prison, but news.com.au learnt he was back living in the community in January this year.

His criminal history includes assaulting children and women, escaping from police custody, theft and drug possession.

The new piece of information comes a day after the fourth anniversary of William’s disappearance — a baffling mystery that has captured the nation’s attention.

Four years on, NSW Police are no closer to finding answers and announced Wednesday that they will hand the investigation to Deputy State Coroner Harriet Grahame. An inquest into the case has been proposed for next year.

The information regarding the burnt-out vehicle will be part of the coronial inquest into William’s disappearance.


As reported by AAP, several persons of interest in the disappearance of the then-toddler — many of whom have never been named — could be forced to reveal what they know under the spotlight of the inquest.

A massive brief of evidence will need to be compiled from physical artefacts, thousands of tip-offs and a “persons of interest” list hundreds of names long.

“(An inquest) makes us go over all the evidence collected in the last four years — it’s an enormous task,” Homicide Squad commander Scott Cook told reporters in Sydney on Wednesday.

“The coroner will consider that and may well ask us to do further things. If that doesn’t occur we’re likely to see an inquest sometime in the early part of next year.”

Detective Superintendent Cook praised the investigators working on the case for their “excellent work”.

A police source told AAP detectives working on William’s case will push for specific persons of interest — those “at the top of the list” — to give evidence at the inquest.

The coroner’s legal powers mean witnesses could be forced to explain their movements and what they know about William’s disappearance — unlike conventional police interviews.

Many of the people have never been named in the media, the police source said, adding only “some names” came out publicly during the investigation.

NSW Police in a statement said investigators “would like to acknowledge the continued strength and courage of William Tyrrell’s families”.

“Over the past year, investigators have continued to explore lines of inquiry in an effort to find out what happened to William, including a large-scale forensic search,” the statement read.

The deputy coroner has requested a brief of evidence which will be provided by the end of the year.

The inquest will be “an opportunity to test information and evidence gathered by Strikeforce Rosann and further the investigation”.

“This is another step in ensuring answers are provided to William’s loved ones,” the police statement said.

William, who was wearing his Spider-man costume at the time of his disappearance, would have turned seven years old in June.

Offline misty

Re: New South Wales toddler William Tyrrell, 3, still missing
« Reply #182 on: March 01, 2019, 12:17:20 AM »
https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-6754963/Lead-detective-William-Tyrrell-case-removed-misconduct-allegations.html

The lead detective in the hunt for missing boy William Tyrrell has been removed from the case while he faces a misconduct investigation.

Detective Chief Inspector Gary Jubelin was kicked off Strike Force Rosann over allegations he used his phone as a recording device without a warrant.

NSW Police confirmed 'an internal investigation is currently underway' by Professional Standards Command into DCI Jubelin.......cont.

Offline misty

Re: New South Wales toddler William Tyrrell, 3, still missing
« Reply #183 on: March 22, 2019, 12:42:00 AM »
https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-6836637/Inquest-disapperance-William-Tyrrell-set-begin.html

By AUSTRALIAN ASSOCIATED PRESS

PUBLISHED: 21:24, 21 March 2019 | UPDATED: 22:41, 21 March 2019
Almost five years after toddler William Tyrrell vanished from his grandmother's backyard detectives are empty-handed, his family is devastated and the fate of the boy in the Spiderman costume remains known only to a suspected predator.

This year the thousands of pieces of evidence, hundreds of interviews, lengthy suspect lists and countless tips amassed during the closely guarded police investigation will be laid bare in the NSW Coroner's Court.

Witnesses will take the stand in Sydney on Monday, less than a year after a large scale forensic search of bushland around the Kendall home under the command of Strikeforce Rosann's then-lead investigator Detective Chief Inspector Gary Jubelin.

'Until we know conclusively that William is not alive, we'll treat it with the possibility that he still is alive,' he said in June, noting the search would rule out that William wandered into the scrub around the mid-north coast home in September 2014.

Those words were echoed at a directions hearing for the inquest in December, where counsel assisting the coroner Gerard Craddock SC said it wasn't possible - yet - to conclude William was dead.

The first week of hearings will see William's family and loved-ones 'set the stage' for investigators to show the three-year-old was likely snatched by a predator, a police source told AAP this month.

Offline misty

Re: New South Wales toddler William Tyrrell, 3, still missing
« Reply #184 on: March 27, 2019, 01:02:45 AM »
https://www.abc.net.au/news/2019-03-26/william-tyrrell-mother-thought-she-heard-scream/10939804
William Tyrrell's foster mother tells inquest about high-pitched scream after disappearance
By Mark Reddie
Updated yesterday at 4:33am

 
William Tyrell's foster mother has described the moment she thought she heard her son scream while searching for him on the day he vanished almost five years ago.

Key points:
William Tyrrell disappeared from his foster grandmother's home in Kendall, NSW in 2014
An inquest is told William's foster mother heard a quick, high-pitched scream the day he disappeared
She was also questioned about a message she left for a person of interest
On day two of the inquest into her son's disappearance, the 49-year-old said the noise led her into bushland surrounding his foster grandmother's home at Kendall on the NSW mid-north coast.

"When a child hurts themselves unexpectedly, there's a scream, and it felt like a scream — it was quick and it was high pitched and it was sharp, which is why I went into these reeds," she said.

"I got into the bush and I thought I can't see any red — I thought maybe I imagined it, maybe it was a bird and I just walked back."

Dressed in a Spider-Man suit, the three-year-old was last seen playing in the front yard of the Benaroon Drive property on September 12, 2014.

His foster mother had gone inside to make a cup of tea, and today, she broke down in tears while reliving the shock she experienced when she could no longer hear her son playing joyfully with his older sister.

"I couldn't hear a thing, it was silent, there was no wind, no birds, all I could think of is, 'why can't I hear him? Why can't I hear him? I can't hear a thing'," she told the court.

The woman, who cannot be named for legal reasons, said she frantically searched around "every property" on the street, but could not remember if she "door-knocked" neighbours.

"I remember saying to people I saw, 'I am looking for a little boy in a Spider-Man suit, have you seen him? His name is William'," she said.

After searching the area, the foster mother said she walked back up Benaroon Drive and went inside her mother's house and called police.

"I remember thinking, he's not here, he's not here, I have to call the police — I went inside and grabbed the cordless phone and called triple 0 and I stood exactly in the same spot where I last saw him," she said, wiping away tears.

The woman was also questioned about a message she left on the phone of repairman William Spedding about the possibility of fixing her mother's washing machine at the property a few days prior to the disappearance.

Police have previously named Mr Spedding as a person of interest in the investigation, but he has always denied any involvement.

Four neighbours have also testified before the inquest today.

Deputy NSW coroner Harriet Grahame praised the actions of one woman, who got her three-year-old daughter to call out William's name in the hope he would "respond to a little person, rather than an adult".

But none of the witnesses could confirm whether or not two cars — a grey car and white station wagon — were parked on Benaroon Drive on the day the toddler went missing

The inquest continues.
===================================================================

Hmmmm....it's the first time I have heard the FM mention a possible scream & also her phone call to Spedding a few days before William's disappearance.
Other news reports have said that a previously unidentified POI has been summoned to give evidence at the inquest later this year. I think this case may take an unexpected twist.

Offline misty

Re: New South Wales toddler William Tyrrell, 3, still missing
« Reply #185 on: July 28, 2019, 11:25:42 PM »
https://play.acast.com/s/wheres-william-tyrrell

A new series of podcasts about William's disappearance.

Inquest continues next month.

Offline misty

Re: New South Wales toddler William Tyrrell, 3, still missing
« Reply #186 on: September 02, 2019, 01:25:18 AM »
A development straight out of McCann case....

https://www.theaustralian.com.au/nation/timestamp-doubts-over-william-photo/news-story/cf0accb8b602bde307146268bfad49c4

EXCLUSIVE
CAROLINE OVERINGTON
ASSOCIATE EDITOR
@overingtonc

12:00AM SEPTEMBER 2, 2019

The NSW Coroner has ordered an urgent forensic examination of the last known photograph of William Tyrrell, dressed in his Spider-Man suit.

The Australian understands an expert in photographic metadata has been called in after NSW police admitted to confusion as to when the widely circulated image was taken. The photograph is a crucial piece of evidence, because it provides what is known as “proof of life” for William on the day of his disappearance on the NSW mid-north coast.

The inquest into his likely death has been told the image was taken on the verandah of the house at Benaroon Drive, Kendall, where he was staying when he went missing, on the morning of September 12, 2014. Counsel ­assisting the Coroner, Gerard Craddock SC, said in his opening statement the photograph was taken at 9.37am, adding: “That is a time of which we can be certain.”

But a new document from the 2000-page brief of evidence ­reveals a “created time” for the image of 7.39am, and a “corrected time” of 9.37am, and police have been unable to explain the confusion.

The report, obtained by The Australian, was generated by X-Ways forensic software. It reveals the image is a .jpg created on a digital camera, and it says: “Created: 12/09/2014 07:39:54. Corrected time: 12/09/2014 09:37:44.”

It is considered ­elemental in a police investigation to get timings right. The “proof of life” evidence in a missing person case is also vital because it helps establish a window in which the person disappeared.

In William’s case, the window has been set between 9.37am, when the last photograph was taken, and 10.57am, when his ­foster mother called triple-0.

The confusion has prompted deputy state coroner Harriet ­Grahame, to tell the court it “needs to be investigated”. As it stands, the inquest has been told that William, his older sister and his foster parents ­arrived in Kendall at 9pm on the evening before William disappeared.

No one other than the ­immediate family — foster mother, foster father, and the foster mother’s mother — saw the children arrive, so the photograph provides the essential “proof of life” for ­William on the morning of September 12.

The inquest has been told that the foster father left the house about 9am to travel to a nearby town to make a Skype call, and pick up a script. The foster mother and her mother stayed at the house with the children, making cups of tea, rolling dice, and playing with crayons. The foster mother has said she took the photograph of William in his Spider-Man suit on the verandah.

Mr Craddock, not the foster mother, put the time stamp on it, in his opening address to the ­inquest. “Whilst the female foster carer, Nana, (William’s sister) and William were on the patio, the female foster carer took some photographs of the children,” he said. “The last of them was taken at 9.37am. That is a time of which we can be certain.

“There we see him in his ­Spider-Man suit … while he was dressed as Spider-Man, he was actually a tiger at that time. You can see him roaring.”

The Australian understands Ms Grahame last week agreed to an application by Michelle Swift, counsel for William’s biological father, for further forensic testing of the image.

Ms Swift’s application was made in open court shortly ­before the inquest was suddenly adjourned for seven months. The subject matter wasn’t ­revealed, and Ms Swift refused to comment. However, Ms Grahame responded to the application by saying the matter needed investigation, and Mr Craddock agreed it was important. Police have been unable to provide the court with an explanation for this terminology, which has in turn ­created uncertainty.

It is not uncommon for there to be confusion about metadata terminology. Phrases such as “date created”, “date modified”, “date digitised” and “date captured” are all commonly used.

As a general rule, a digital camera will record the date and time information in the actual image as EXIF (or “exchangeable image file format”) metadata.

EXIF data mostly travels with the photo when it is exported from camera to computer, printer or USB, and it’s therefore considered the most reliable guide to the time of creation. Accuracy depends, however, on the date and time settings of the camera. A modified or created date will normally refer to the time the image arrived on a computer, or else was edited, or otherwise ­accessed.

There are several explanations for the different time stamp on the photograph of William: the earlier time may be the right one; the camera may not have been adjusted for local time; the computer may have incorrect settings; or else the mistake may be in the report itself (a product of input error, for example).

William’s foster mother has told the inquiry that William was out of sight for just a few ­moments, some time around 10.15am. She called triple-0 at 10.57am, after spending some time searching for the boy, with help from neighbours.

She searched the house, the garden, and at one point got in her mother’s car and drove up as far as the disabled riding school about a kilometre away from the house, before turning back.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

It's almost unbelievable that the Australian police had not previously checked out the data on the last photo taken of William.
William's 85yr old foster grandmother, whom the family were visiting at the time of his disappearance, will not be testifying during the ongoing coronial inquest.