Author Topic: Is Luke Mitchell guilty - your views  (Read 16707 times)

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Offline Nicholas

Re: Is Luke Mitchell guilty - your views
« Reply #15 on: September 17, 2018, 03:12:25 PM »
Agreed. I don't know who the rest of the team is made up of but I've always been impressed by Sandra Lean's dedication and how she conducts herself so it's nice to see something happening.

I've never been able to fully decide on guilt or innocence when it come's to Luke's case but I don't think the circumstances of his incarceration were fair and so he deserves a hearing, in my opinion.

http://miscarriageofjustice.co/index.php?topic=4792.0

http://miscarriageofjustice.co/index.php?topic=595.msg429134#msg429134
« Last Edit: September 17, 2018, 03:46:35 PM by Stephanie »

Offline Baz

Re: Is Luke Mitchell guilty - your views
« Reply #16 on: September 17, 2018, 04:46:05 PM »
I didn't see anything in those two threads to change my opinion of Sandra Lean, if that was your point.

I don't personally believe campaigning for someone who turned out to be guilty should be used as an argument for bad character.

Offline Nicholas

Re: Is Luke Mitchell guilty - your views
« Reply #17 on: September 17, 2018, 05:10:08 PM »
I didn't see anything in those two threads to change my opinion of Sandra Lean, if that was your point.

I don't personally believe campaigning for someone who turned out to be guilty should be used as an argument for bad character.

 8@??)(


http://miscarriageofjustice.co/index.php?topic=595.msg429131#msg429131

« Last Edit: September 17, 2018, 05:18:59 PM by Stephanie »

Offline Nicholas

Re: Is Luke Mitchell guilty - your views
« Reply #18 on: September 17, 2018, 05:11:45 PM »
I didn't see anything in those two threads to change my opinion of Sandra Lean, if that was your point.

I don't personally believe campaigning for someone who turned out to be guilty should be used as an argument for bad character.

https://www.scotsman.com/news/bbc-axes-biased-mitchell-documentary-1-1425550

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/scotland/6634611.stm
« Last Edit: September 17, 2018, 05:15:59 PM by Stephanie »

Offline Baz

Re: Is Luke Mitchell guilty - your views
« Reply #19 on: September 17, 2018, 05:28:47 PM »

Offline Nicholas

Re: Is Luke Mitchell guilty - your views
« Reply #20 on: September 17, 2018, 05:38:29 PM »
Who is this "amazing team of people" to which you refer?

And what makes you think "his day is coming?"


Luke Mitchell appears to have similar traits to Jeremy Bamber, for example, unable to take responsibility for his actions and blames everyone else. Also referred to as blame shifting

When referring to Jodi Jones murder, 30 year old Luke Mitchell recently stated:

“It’s the story of my life really. I was always bullied as a kid - by my teachers, other schoolkids.

“I was always taught never throw the first punch. I’ve always been blamed for things I didn’t do. This situation is an escalated version of that
https://www.scotsman.com/news/luke-mitchell-i-would-rather-stay-in-jail-than-admit-my-guilt-for-murder-of-jodi-jones-1-4800732


"One of the diagnostic criteria in the ‘Psychopathy Checklist - Revised’ (PCLR) is ‘Failure to accept responsibility for own actions’. So yes, psychopaths blame other people for their own mistakes.

Psychopaths are grandiose or ‘superior’, lack empathy and have shallow emotions. They have no shame or remorse and are manipulative, pathological liars. They have no conscience (in other words no internal sense of right and wrong) and also lack self-insight. They see the people around them as objects. Put all these factors together and blaming others for their own actions is the easiest, most natural thing in the world.

Psychopaths rarely, if ever, take responsibility for their actions, even if they clearly made mistakes or their actions and decisions led to failures. But they go a few steps farther; they will not only blame others but also create “evidence” that others are to blame. This takes effort, but psychopaths easily integrate it into their game, seizing on opportunities to bring harm to others’ careers or professional standing https://www.quora.com/Do-psychopaths-tend-to-blame-other-people-for-their-own-mistakes

"Sandra Lean says her book came about because she is driven by the need to know the right person is locked up.

THE heavy doors clanged shut behind Sandra Lean as she made her way inside a notorious young offenders' institution to meet one of Scotland's most infamous prisoners.

With piles of legal papers, transcripts, notes and scribbled questions in her arms, she sat down to look into convicted killer Luke Mitchell's face - and was troubled by what saw.

"I thought: 'Oh, he's just a bairn, he's just a laddie'," she recalls. "He looked so much younger, people have forgotten how young. But he is a strong lad with a brilliant sense of humour. One who still believes this is just one huge cock-up, that it's just a matter of time before it gets sorted out http://truthinjustice.org/no-smoke.htm

Offline Nicholas

Re: Is Luke Mitchell guilty - your views
« Reply #21 on: September 17, 2018, 06:43:55 PM »
"Sandra Lean says her book came about because she is driven by the need to know the right person is locked up.

THE heavy doors clanged shut behind Sandra Lean as she made her way inside a notorious young offenders' institution to meet one of Scotland's most infamous prisoners.

With piles of legal papers, transcripts, notes and scribbled questions in her arms, she sat down to look into convicted killer Luke Mitchell's face - and was troubled by what saw.

"I thought: 'Oh, he's just a bairn, he's just a laddie'," she recalls. "He looked so much younger, people have forgotten how young. But he is a strong lad with a brilliant sense of humour. One who still believes this is just one huge cock-up, that it's just a matter of time before it gets sorted out http://truthinjustice.org/no-smoke.htm

The letter also addresses claims that Mitchell appeared cold and emotionless after the discovery of Jodi's body. He said a GP had prescribed tablets for anxiety and depression that are not recommended for children.https://www.heraldscotland.com/news/13057041.Mitchell_tells_of_night_he_found_girlfriend_Jodi_dead/

Offline Nicholas

Re: Is Luke Mitchell guilty - your views
« Reply #22 on: September 17, 2018, 06:51:10 PM »
The letter also addresses claims that Mitchell appeared cold and emotionless after the discovery of Jodi's body. He said a GP had prescribed tablets for anxiety and depression that are not recommended for children.https://www.heraldscotland.com/news/13057041.Mitchell_tells_of_night_he_found_girlfriend_Jodi_dead/

The boyfriend of Jodi Jones, the Scottish schoolgirl found dead near her home, told a psychiatrist he was smoking the equivalent of 40 cannabis joints a day in the weeks leading up to the girl's death, a court heard yesterday.
Luke Mitchell, 16, who denies murdering the teenager, also said his consumption doubled after her death.
However, a police officer told the High Court in Edinburgh that he doubted whether even an adult could have taken that amount of cannabis and continued to function.

"It is a huge amount," said Dc Brian Melrose, 42, a drug squad officer. "I have never heard of that amount used by anyone I have spoken to in 19 years of police service."
The court heard that when police arrested Mitchell and charged him with murdering Jodi, 14, they found a piece of cannabis resin in his trousers weighing more than 97 grammes, and two smaller pieces weighing almost seven grammes. Mitchell said he had paid around £150 for it.
Dc Melrose told the court that that price would be "cheap", but "not without the bounds of possibility".
The detective added that a user might add 150mg or 200mg of cannabis resin to tobacco to make a reefer cigarette. Asked how many reefer cigarettes could have been made from Mitchell's cannabis, Dc Melrose said: "You are looking at nearly 500."
The officer said a drug user might smoke three or four, perhaps five, such joints a day.

Alan Turnbull QC, prosecuting, showed the officer a report which said that during an interview with a doctor Mitchell said he was using about two ounces of cannabis a week before Jodi died. Afterwards, it was more like four ounces a week.
Dc Melrose agreed that two ounces a week would cost around £90, and would make "something of the order of 300 reefer cigarettes".


Mitchell denies murdering Jodi, of Easthouses, Dalkeith, in woods near Roan's Dyke, on June 30, 2003 by hitting her and constricting her neck. He claims that at the time he was in, or near his home in Dalkeith, and that Jodi was murdered by a person, or persons, unknown.
He also denies being concerned in the supply of cannabis resin and possessing knives in public places
.
https://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/uknews/1480513/Boyfriend-in-Jodi-killing-case-smoked-40-joints-a-day.html
« Last Edit: September 17, 2018, 07:01:52 PM by Stephanie »

Offline Nicholas

Re: Is Luke Mitchell guilty - your views
« Reply #23 on: September 17, 2018, 07:12:35 PM »
Kara Van Nuil is adamant that her ex-boyfriend did kill Jodi, and also revealed she is terrified that Mitchell will attempt to track her down on his release.

The 24-year-old, who believes that her decision to end the relationship probably saved her life, has now moved away from Midlothian in an attempt to avoid being found.

Ms Van Nuil, who was 16 when she dated Mitchell, maintains that he pressed a blade to her neck during an Army Cadet Force platoon meeting.

With the other cadets enjoying a snack break outside the hut, Mitchell is said to have grabbed Ms Van Nuil from behind, turned her round and forced a penknife to her throat.

"There's not one part of me that thinks he isn't guilty," she said. "Because of the way he was with me that day, I don't have a doubt in my mind at all. It definitely was him.

"He is so strong and he can easily hold someone down like me. I'm tiny and I'm sure Jodi was the same. I had no power to fight back.

"He is a very disturbed boy," she continued. "He looked up to Marilyn Manson, who is strange himself. It was everything though, from the music to the drugs. He even urinated in bottles in his bedroom; who does that?

"He was chilled out, giggly and laid back one minute, obviously that was down to the stuff he was smoking, but then he'd turn weird. It was like he had a split personality."

It was not until Jodi's slaying that Ms Van Nuil, who is now settled with a new partner and pregnant with her second son, decided to tell her friends and family of the terrifying encounter.

Ms Van Nuil added: "I'm scared that he could get out and come and find me.

"There are a lot of people that don't like him and are scared because if he is freed there is a chance this could happen to some poor girl again. I think he is where he should be. https://www.express.co.uk/news/uk/319784/Jodi-s-family-hit-back-over-killers-claims-of-innocence

Offline Nicholas

Re: Is Luke Mitchell guilty - your views
« Reply #24 on: September 17, 2018, 07:19:33 PM »
The letter also addresses claims that Mitchell appeared cold and emotionless after the discovery of Jodi's body. He said a GP had prescribed tablets for anxiety and depression that are not recommended for children.https://www.heraldscotland.com/news/13057041.Mitchell_tells_of_night_he_found_girlfriend_Jodi_dead/

Detective Chief Superintendent Craig Dobbie believes he has the "why". Softly spoken and bespectacled, Dobbie was appointed head of the murder hunt after Jodi’s body was discovered in the woods near Roan’s Dyke, Dalkeith, hours after she met her death. He fought to solve a crime which lacked critical DNA evidence, finding himself up against a teenage suspect who showed immense cunning under the fiercest pressure.

In that time he had to think himself into the mind of Luke Mitchell. Today, in an exclusive interview, the senior investigating officer in the Jodi Jones case reveals his own thoughts on what happened at Roan’s Dyke on 30th June, 2003.

Dobbie’s theory, based on his own close scrutiny of the case and the facts as they emerged during Mitchell’s trial, is that the murderer was a violent fantasist who killed his girlfriend when she became upset after discovering he was two-timing her. He then mutilated her body to emulate the gruesome death of an actress, Elizabeth Short, known as the Black Dahlia. Mitchell’s hero, the controversial American rocker Marilyn Manson, has produced a series of paintings of Short’s body, which was cut in half, her face and breast slashed.

"One potential motive is the fantasy Luke had about what it would be like to kill someone and get away with it," said Dobbie. "He had said he could imagine himself killing someone and he knew how to. That’s verging on fantasy. He is exhibiting knowledge. And one influence could well have been Marilyn Manson’s depiction of the Black Dahlia murder. No-one can escape from the fact that there are glaring similarities between the dead bodies of Jodi Jones and Elizabeth Short as depicted in Marilyn Manson’s watercolours. He then has to have the opportunity, the catalyst."

That catalyst came, Dobbie believes, when Mitchell confessed he was planning a holiday with another girl. This led to the fatal confrontation between the teenage lovers in the woods.

But for Luke Mitchell life was much darker. Clues were emerging about just how dangerous he might be at a very young age. Born in July 1988, his parents Corinne and Philip split up when he was 11. He grew up under the care of his mother and she allowed him to do exactly as he pleased. He lived in a state of near squalor; keeping his own urine in bottles in his bedroom, rarely washing and wearing the same clothes for days on end. Left largely to his own devices he became defiant, violent and brooding with an unhealthy fascination with knives, the occult and drugs. He was first brought to the attention of the mental health profession aged just 11, following a fight at King’s Park Primary in Dalkeith. Although the incident was just a minor skirmish with another pupil, Mitchell’s attitude was sufficiently troublesome to warrant a referral to a school psychiatrist. However, there appears to have been little further action taken by the education authorities or his parents to curb his behaviour. When he was 12 he threatened his then girlfriend with a knife because she refused to have sex with him. The incidents went on. When he moved to St David’s High, a music teacher found him trying to throttle another pupil and he was sent to an educational psychologist. He refused the expert’s help. Instead Mitchell became a rebellious, mysterious teenager who was heavily into cannabis and supplied his Goth friends with the drug. He also appeared to have an unhealthy interest in the occult. The jotters at his Catholic school were daubed with Satanic slogans, and he wrote a school essay containing references to the devil. Yet teachers appeared to have little control over him and he would simply defy their instructions when it suited him. Even more worryingly, he also acquired a fascination with knives. His older brother, Shane, had a knife collection and Mitchell gathered his own array. At a party six weeks before killing Jones, he repeatedly jabbed her in the leg with a knife he had been using to cut up cannabis. Although she was clearly devoted to Mitchell, Jones was not his only girlfriend. He had also been seeing at least two other girls and may even have been grooming them to see which would make the most suitable victim. One of them was Kara van Nuil, now 17, who met him at army cadets in 2003. He wooed her with romantic text messages but their relationship ended abruptly after he followed her into the cadet hut one night, crept up on her, put his arm around her neck and placed a knife to her throat. Later he tried to laugh it off but van Nuil had been terrified. One month later he killed Jodi Jones. Another of Mitchell’s girlfriends was 15-year-old Kimberley Thomson, from Kenmore, Perthshire who he had been seeing for about a year before the murder. They had met while he was on holiday and kept in touch. Her resemblance to Jones was uncanny. Mitchell had arranged to go and stay with Thomson for a fortnight shortly after school broke up. At some point, he was going to have to break this news to Jones. Dobbie said: "There is a potential Jodi found out about Luke’s planned holiday with Kimberley that Monday. I think he told her at lunchtime." That conversation may have taken place at one of their favourite hideaways, an alcove off King’s Park, Dalkeith, known locally as the China Gardens. It was a place for teenagers to gather and smoke. They lit up a joint and sat alone until a friend joined them.

Read more at: https://www.scotsman.com/news/natural-born-killer-1-1401861
« Last Edit: September 17, 2018, 08:08:29 PM by Stephanie »

Offline Nicholas

Re: Is Luke Mitchell guilty - your views
« Reply #25 on: September 17, 2018, 10:56:52 PM »
I've never been able to fully decide on guilt or innocence when it come's to Luke's case but I don't think the circumstances of his incarceration were fair and so he deserves a hearing, in my opinion.

Out of interest, how many "hearings" do you think a convicted murderer should have in order to satisfy those people who are undecided (or cannot decide one way or another) like yourself?

Many murder cases are based on circumstantial evidence. To what "circumstances" do you refer which "weren't fair?"

Offline Nicholas

Re: Is Luke Mitchell guilty - your views
« Reply #26 on: September 18, 2018, 08:12:37 AM »
Who is this "amazing team of people" to which you refer?

And what makes you think "his day is coming?"


Luke Mitchell appears to have similar traits to Jeremy Bamber, for example, unable to take responsibility for his actions and blames everyone else. Also referred to as blame shifting

When referring to Jodi Jones murder, 30 year old Luke Mitchell recently stated:

It’s the story of my life really. I was always bullied as a kid - by my teachers, other schoolkids.

“I was always taught never throw the first punch. I’ve always been blamed for things I didn’t do. This situation is an escalated version of that
https://www.scotsman.com/news/luke-mitchell-i-would-rather-stay-in-jail-than-admit-my-guilt-for-murder-of-jodi-jones-1-4800732


"One of the diagnostic criteria in the ‘Psychopathy Checklist - Revised’ (PCLR) is ‘Failure to accept responsibility for own actions’. So yes, psychopaths blame other people for their own mistakes.

Psychopaths are grandiose or ‘superior’, lack empathy and have shallow emotions. They have no shame or remorse and are manipulative, pathological liars. They have no conscience (in other words no internal sense of right and wrong) and also lack self-insight. They see the people around them as objects. Put all these factors together and blaming others for their own actions is the easiest, most natural thing in the world.

Psychopaths rarely, if ever, take responsibility for their actions, even if they clearly made mistakes or their actions and decisions led to failures. But they go a few steps farther; they will not only blame others but also create “evidence” that others are to blame. This takes effort, but psychopaths easily integrate it into their game, seizing on opportunities to bring harm to others’ careers or professional standing https://www.quora.com/Do-psychopaths-tend-to-blame-other-people-for-their-own-mistakes

"The fact the jury in the Jodi Jones murder trial was told Luke Mitchell had 20 bottles of urine in his bedroom did not amount to a miscarriage of justice.
The Appeal Court in Edinburgh has been told the judge's speech to jurors at Mitchell's trial ensured they were not influenced by the unconnected evidence.
The Crown also said transcripts from a police interview did not show he had been a "bullying" victim.

Mr Beckett also covered eight segments from a police interview with Mitchell that Mr Findlay raised objections about.
He argued that the dialogue, which included discussion of Mitchell's actions on the night Jodi was murdered, did not show signs of "pressure, trickery or bullying"

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/scotland/edinburgh_and_east/7247137.stm
« Last Edit: September 18, 2018, 08:24:29 AM by Stephanie »

Offline Nicholas

Re: Is Luke Mitchell guilty - your views
« Reply #27 on: September 18, 2018, 08:31:56 AM »
I support Luke in his fight for justice. it is fantastic to see the news headlines today and know that he has an amazing team of people working so hard to clear his name

His day is coming!

I find Sandra Leans "conduct" disingenuous.

MOJO have recently publicised that they hope to have an application for appeal ready in 2019; hardly suggestive that Luke Mitchell's "day is coming." It's nothing more than an attention seeking publicity stunt!


Luke Mitchell has been found guilty of the "truly evil murder" of his 14-year-old girlfriend Jodi Jones.
The judge, Lord Nimmo Smith, told Mitchell he would face "detention without limit of time", for the murder.
The 16-year-old had applied a ligature around Jodi's arms, and struck her repeatedly on the head, mouth and body with a knife, the court had heard.
Lord Smith told Mitchell: "It lies beyond any skill of mind to look into the black depths of your mind.
"You have been convicted of a truly evil murder - one of the most appalling crimes that any of us can remember - and you will rightly be regarded as wicked.
"I have no idea what led you to do what you did.
"Maybe it was a desire for notoriety, to achieve something grotesque
.
The jury came to its majority verdict on the second day of deliberations at the High Court in Edinburgh
https://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/1481694/Luke-Mitchell-guilty-of-Jodi-murder.html

Offline Nicholas

Re: Is Luke Mitchell guilty - your views
« Reply #28 on: September 18, 2018, 08:58:56 AM »
I find Sandra Leans "conduct" disingenuous.

MOJO have recently publicised that they hope to have an application for appeal ready in 2019; hardly suggestive that Luke Mitchell's "day is coming." It's nothing more than an attention seeking publicity stunt!


Luke Mitchell has been found guilty of the "truly evil murder" of his 14-year-old girlfriend Jodi Jones.
The judge, Lord Nimmo Smith, told Mitchell he would face "detention without limit of time", for the murder.
The 16-year-old had applied a ligature around Jodi's arms, and struck her repeatedly on the head, mouth and body with a knife, the court had heard.
Lord Smith told Mitchell: "It lies beyond any skill of mind to look into the black depths of your mind.
"You have been convicted of a truly evil murder - one of the most appalling crimes that any of us can remember - and you will rightly be regarded as wicked.
"I have no idea what led you to do what you did.
"Maybe it was a desire for notoriety, to achieve something grotesque
.
The jury came to its majority verdict on the second day of deliberations at the High Court in Edinburgh
https://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/1481694/Luke-Mitchell-guilty-of-Jodi-murder.html

He's served 15 years of a 20 year sentence and claims "he'd rather stay in jail than admit his guilt" https://www.scotsman.com/news/luke-mitchell-i-would-rather-stay-in-jail-than-admit-my-guilt-for-murder-of-jodi-jones-1-4800732

Who thinks he'll be released in 5 years time? I don't! He knows he has nothing to lose by maintaining innocence, like Jeremy Bamber, and most probably knows it's unlikely the authorities will release him after 20years.


"1] On 21 January 2005 the appellant was after trial convicted of murder. On 11 February 2005 he was sentenced to detention without limit of time, a punishment part of twenty years being specified by the trial judge http://www.scotcourts.gov.uk/search-judgments/judgment?id=b57d86a6-8980-69d2-b500-ff0000d74aa7

Offline Baz

Re: Is Luke Mitchell guilty - your views
« Reply #29 on: September 18, 2018, 09:28:55 AM »
Out of interest, how many "hearings" do you think a convicted murderer should have in order to satisfy those people who are undecided (or cannot decide one way or another) like yourself?

I don't think that hearings should be based upon my opinion at all.

Quote
Many murder cases are based on circumstantial evidence. To what "circumstances" do you refer which "weren't fair?"

Mainly the behaviour of the police, the quality of the investigation and the fact that Luke was all but declared guilty by the press well before his trial.

Will you now answer my question about your applauding emoji?