Author Topic: Can the UK's lost fishing industry be recovered post Brexit?  (Read 10045 times)

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stephen25000

  • Guest
Re: Can the UK's lost fishing industry be recovered post Brexit?
« Reply #15 on: July 06, 2016, 12:00:16 PM »
Have you slept through the last ten years?

NO.

Now provide your proof.

Offline Angelo222

Re: Can the UK's lost fishing industry be recovered post Brexit?
« Reply #16 on: July 06, 2016, 12:03:48 PM »
NO.

Now provide your proof.

In 2010 the Spanish owned trawlers O Gentia and Coyo Tercero were fined a total of £1.62 million for illegal fishing. Coyo Tercero was stopped by the Royal Navy fisheries protection vessel HMS Tyne and found to have 500kg of salted ling on board which were not recorded in the logbook while O Genita had been involved in illegal ship-to-ship transfers of fish at sea in an attempt to avoid quota restrictions. (3) Danny Poulding of the Marine Management Organisation which led the prosecutions stated in 2010:

“This company systematically abused the quota system for significant and unfair financial gain, threatening the future sustainability of an already vulnerable fish stock and impacting on the businesses of legitimate fishermen by flooding the market with cheaper fish. (3)“

However, the news released in 2013 revealed that despite its past crimes the O Genita still had a large quota to fish in UK waters – clearly serious breaches of UK and EU fishing laws are no barrier to being rewarded with quotas in the future.

http://britishseafishing.co.uk/cornelis-vrolijk/
« Last Edit: July 06, 2016, 12:06:45 PM by Angelo222 »
De troothe has the annoying habit of coming to the surface just when you least expect it!!

Je ne regrette rien!!

Offline Angelo222

Re: Can the UK's lost fishing industry be recovered post Brexit?
« Reply #17 on: July 06, 2016, 12:14:23 PM »
Can you prove that to be true, since if it was there would be no fish left ?

Wasn't that the point back then, the foreign boats both legal under the EU and illegal had lifted so many fish that severe quotas had to be brought in to protect what was left.
De troothe has the annoying habit of coming to the surface just when you least expect it!!

Je ne regrette rien!!

stephen25000

  • Guest
Re: Can the UK's lost fishing industry be recovered post Brexit?
« Reply #18 on: July 06, 2016, 12:14:32 PM »
In 2010 the Spanish owned trawlers O Gentia and Coyo Tercero were fined a total of £1.62 million for illegal fishing. Coyo Tercero was stopped by the Royal Navy fisheries protection vessel HMS Tyne and found to have 500kg of salted ling on board which were not recorded in the logbook while O Genita had been involved in illegal ship-to-ship transfers of fish at sea in an attempt to avoid quota restrictions. (3) Danny Poulding of the Marine Management Organisation which led the prosecutions stated in 2010:

“This company systematically abused the quota system for significant and unfair financial gain, threatening the future sustainability of an already vulnerable fish stock and impacting on the businesses of legitimate fishermen by flooding the market with cheaper fish. (3)“

However, the news released in 2013 revealed that despite its past crimes the O Genita still had a large quota to fish in UK waters – clearly serious breaches of UK and EU fishing laws are no barrier to being rewarded with quotas in the future.

http://britishseafishing.co.uk/cornelis-vrolijk/

 A new report has found that Britain is the country most responsible for overfishing in its territorial waters despite it being bound by the Common Fisheries Policy which sets annual quotas.
The report by the New Foundation said that UK fisheries ministers “squander the economic potential of our seas by consistently fishing over and above the limits recommended by scientists,” according to The Times.

Quotas for fishermen from across the EU are decided by fisheries ministers in Brussels. They have to negotiate for a large enough ‘Total Allowable Catch’ to keep what remains of the UK fishing industry afloat while not plundering the UK’s territorial waters. The discussions of the meetings are kept secret, with only the findings being made public.

And up until the CFP was finally reformed, the TAC resulted in millions of tonnes of dead fish being thrown overboard after being caught as the European Commission had failed to understand that the ‘discards’ would be dead after they had been caught and brought on board.

According to the report’s authors, food for an additional 160 million EU citizens and an extra €3.2 billion in annual revenue could be made if ministers paid more attention to scientific advice, which would result in stocks being allowed to return to their maximum sustainable yield (MSY). It says that if this happened, 100,000 jobs across the EU could be created.

But the findings ignore the devastation the Common Fisheries Policy has brought to the UK’s fishing industry; once thriving and now on its knees. Sometimes British fishermen can only stand on the shore and watch, their quotas reached, as trawlers from other countries catch fish in UK territorial waters.

“Every year fisheries ministers have an opportunity to unlock this potential when they agree how much fish should be caught in EU waters,” the report says. “Scientific bodies like the International Council for the Exploration of the Sea (ICES) and the Scientific, Technical and Economic Committee for Fisheries (STECF) provide provide information about the state of most stocks and recommend maximum catch levels.

“The UK, France and Denmark top the ranking of EU overfishing states in Northern European waters because they have the highest share of stocks that will be fished above scientific advice. For example, UK will fish 34,453 tonnes of mackerel; France 7,118 tonnes of blue whiting; and Denmark 17,710 tonnes of sprat, all in excess of scientific advice.”

Statistics included in the findings say that between 1987 and 2011, Total Allowable Catches were set higher than scientific advice in an average of 68 per cent of decisions for 31 out of the total 69 categories of fish stocks. And it says there are few signs that the reformed CFP has led to any real chance, with TAC for the Baltic Sea and deep waters in 2015 also set above the recommended levels of scientists.

But the report was questioned by UKIP Fisheries spokesman Ray Finch MEP who said that it failed to take into account the bartering which has to take place as member states territorial waters became property of the European Union.

“British waters are indeed overfished but once we leave the CFP and gain control of our own fish stocks we will be able to make decisions based on the best interests of Britain, our fishing industry and our fish stocks.

“The CFP has been one of the biggest environmental disasters in modern times and the responsibility for that should be laid firmly at the feet of Brussels Bureaucrats greedy to allow overfishing and weak British ministers.”

A spokeswoman for the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs said: “The UK government enters annual negotiations [with the EU] with the firm belief that any decisions need to deliver a thriving fishing industry, sustainable fish stocks and a healthy marine environment. We listen to the best available scientific advice to achieve this.”
http://www.breitbart.com/london/2015/03/26/report-slams-britain-as-worst-in-eu-for-overfishing-in-its-own-waters/


i.e. Angelo, it isn't just one country over fishing and abusing quotas.
« Last Edit: July 06, 2016, 12:18:56 PM by stephen25000 »

Offline G-Unit

Re: Can the UK's lost fishing industry be recovered post Brexit?
« Reply #19 on: July 06, 2016, 12:18:11 PM »
so do we have the same amount of fishing boats operating before we enterEd the EU

it seems the uk waters are where all the fish are and thats why the foreign ships are here

The EU swiftly altered the rules in 1970 just as Britain, Ireland, Denmark and Norway applied to join. Between them they controlled the richest fishing grounds in the world. The rule change allowed all member states equal access. This helped those who had depleted fish stocks in the Mediterranean. I believe this was one of the reasons for Greenland exiting and they do OK.
Accept nothing
Believe no-one
Confirm everything

Offline Holly Goodhead

Re: Can the UK's lost fishing industry be recovered post Brexit?
« Reply #20 on: July 06, 2016, 12:52:22 PM »
Individual fishing quotas are obviously one aspect but running huge projects like Little Britian and the EU will always present conflicts of interest which need managing. 

What takes precedence the stability of the UK's economy or fishing quotas?
Setting the pussy among the pigeons!

Alfie

  • Guest
Re: Can the UK's lost fishing industry be recovered post Brexit?
« Reply #21 on: July 06, 2016, 01:24:07 PM »
So do Leavers expect to see the return of the British fishing industry in all its glory now?  What other industries do you expect to see being boosted by us leaving the EU? 

Offline Angelo222

Re: Can the UK's lost fishing industry be recovered post Brexit?
« Reply #22 on: July 06, 2016, 01:45:55 PM »
So do Leavers expect to see the return of the British fishing industry in all its glory now?  What other industries do you expect to see being boosted by us leaving the EU?

The fishing stocks are recovering since the Spanish and Dutch factory ships had to go elsewhere.  The industry will recover some of the ground lost but as so many boats have been broken up and so many experienced fishermen has been lost for ever that it will take a while.
De troothe has the annoying habit of coming to the surface just when you least expect it!!

Je ne regrette rien!!

Online John

Re: Can the UK's lost fishing industry be recovered post Brexit?
« Reply #23 on: July 06, 2016, 11:48:27 PM »
The important thing is that we take back control of fishing in our inshore waters.  Our fishermen at last have an opportunity which many thought would never come again.  It is a very true saying, nothing lasts for ever!
« Last Edit: July 07, 2016, 12:28:31 PM by John »
A malicious prosecution for a crime which never existed. John Lamberton exposes malfeasance by public officials.
Check out my website >   http://johnlamberton.webs.com/index.htm?no_redirect=true     The truth never changes with the passage of time.

stephen25000

  • Guest
Re: Can the UK's lost fishing industry be recovered post Brexit?
« Reply #24 on: July 07, 2016, 08:43:45 AM »
The important thing is that we take back control of fishing in our inshore waters.  Our fishermen at last have an opportunity which many thought would never come again.  It is can very true saying, nothing lasts for ever!

Neither do the fish. 8**8:/:

Offline Carana

Re: Can the UK's lost fishing industry be recovered post Brexit?
« Reply #25 on: July 07, 2016, 09:12:05 AM »
The important thing is that we take back control of fishing in our inshore waters.  Our fishermen at last have an opportunity which many thought would never come again.  It is can very true saying, nothing lasts for ever!


That may depend on what trade deal can be struck.

"The EU is by far our biggest export market; in 2014, exports of fish and fish products to the EU were worth £1.01 billion, almost double the £550 million sold to all other countries combined (2). We run a net trade surplus with the EU in fish and fish products, with exports worth £160 million more than imports."


At the moment, the UK as a £160 m trade surplus.

If the UK doesn't cut a deal, then presumably WTO tariffs would apply  (this is from 2009, so it may not be up-to-date) - see p. 23 (p.25 of the pdf) onwards:
http://www.europarl.europa.eu/RegData/etudes/etudes/join/2009/419119/IPOL-PECH_ET(2009)419119_EN.pdf

A different issue is that the UK would still need to abide by the various UN conventions.


Offline Carana

Re: Can the UK's lost fishing industry be recovered post Brexit?
« Reply #26 on: July 07, 2016, 09:14:44 AM »
Neither do the fish. 8**8:/:

A slight problem is that fish, erm, swim. I wonder if anyone told the fish about Brexit?  &%+((£

Offline Carana

Re: Can the UK's lost fishing industry be recovered post Brexit?
« Reply #27 on: July 07, 2016, 10:06:10 AM »


Commercial fishing and fisheries – guidance
European Maritime and Fisheries Fund (EMFF): before you apply

From:
    Marine Management Organisation
First published:
    18 January 2016
Last updated:
    23 May 2016, see all updates
Part of:
    Funding, Marine environment and Marine fisheries



The UK has €243 million (around £190 million) of the programme which is split between England (€92.1 million), Scotland (€107.7 million) Northern Ireland (€23.5 million) and Wales (€19.7 million).

https://www.gov.uk/guidance/european-maritime-and-fisheries-fund-emff-before-you-apply

Online John

Re: Can the UK's lost fishing industry be recovered post Brexit?
« Reply #28 on: July 07, 2016, 12:33:02 PM »


That may depend on what trade deal can be struck.

"The EU is by far our biggest export market; in 2014, exports of fish and fish products to the EU were worth £1.01 billion, almost double the £550 million sold to all other countries combined (2). We run a net trade surplus with the EU in fish and fish products, with exports worth £160 million more than imports."


At the moment, the UK as a £160 m trade surplus.

If the UK doesn't cut a deal, then presumably WTO tariffs would apply  (this is from 2009, so it may not be up-to-date) - see p. 23 (p.25 of the pdf) onwards:
http://www.europarl.europa.eu/RegData/etudes/etudes/join/2009/419119/IPOL-PECH_ET(2009)419119_EN.pdf

A different issue is that the UK would still need to abide by the various UN conventions.

They need our fish just as we delight in their automobile products and Mediterranean spoils.  Have faith, all will be resolved in the fullness of time.
A malicious prosecution for a crime which never existed. John Lamberton exposes malfeasance by public officials.
Check out my website >   http://johnlamberton.webs.com/index.htm?no_redirect=true     The truth never changes with the passage of time.

stephen25000

  • Guest
Re: Can the UK's lost fishing industry be recovered post Brexit?
« Reply #29 on: July 07, 2016, 12:39:51 PM »
They need our fish just as we delight in their automobile products and Mediterranean spoils.  Have faith, all will be resolved in the fullness of time.

Have faith , in what exactly?


Fish migrate. The boats can only fish in the agreed areas.

Over fishing happens and will happen again.