Author Topic: The latest political scandal; A wirchhunt or a necessary exposé?  (Read 1502 times)

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Offline Holly Goodhead

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Re: The latest political scandal; A wirchhunt or a necessary exposé?
« Reply #30 on: December 19, 2017, 10:31:15 AM »
No, I just accept I'm wasting my time discussing this issue with someone whose attitudes and understanding are so outdated.

Suggesting that women's choice of clothes makes them fair game is a very old-fashioned idea.

I disagree that all cases can be lumped together eg if a man places a friendly arm around a woman's shoulder years later the woman can accuse the man of over-stepping the mark. 

I also disagree that women aren't responsible to some degree for how they are treated by others by their behaviour which includes dressing appropriately for the occasion. 

You may recall judge Pickle's comments:

His views on women made him a target for feminists, but he was unapologetic: “I’ve never said that a woman who goes about bra-less or dressed in a certain manner deserves to be raped; what I have said is that if a woman dresses in a particular way and behaves in a particular manner she may be misunderstood as to her availability sexually.”

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/obituaries/law-obituaries/8220386/His-Honour-James-Pickles.html

It's common sense surely?  Would you leave valuables on display in your car and/or leave it unlocked? 

I'm not suggesting women should be hidden away behind burkas to protect themselves from 'uncontrollable' male lust! 

Women can look attractive without being overtly sexual.
 
Justice 4 Sheila and Jeremy: victims of poorly arranged 'Baby Scoop Era' adoptions.  Australia has apologised
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5hVbokTpYeg time for UK to do the same https://www.theguardian.com/society/2016/nov/04/baby-adoption-practices-of-past-demand-inquiry-say-law-firms

Online G-Unit

Re: The latest political scandal; A wirchhunt or a necessary exposé?
« Reply #31 on: December 21, 2017, 03:13:15 PM »
I disagree that all cases can be lumped together eg if a man places a friendly arm around a woman's shoulder years later the woman can accuse the man of over-stepping the mark. 

I also disagree that women aren't responsible to some degree for how they are treated by others by their behaviour which includes dressing appropriately for the occasion. 

You may recall judge Pickle's comments:

His views on women made him a target for feminists, but he was unapologetic: “I’ve never said that a woman who goes about bra-less or dressed in a certain manner deserves to be raped; what I have said is that if a woman dresses in a particular way and behaves in a particular manner she may be misunderstood as to her availability sexually.”

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/obituaries/law-obituaries/8220386/His-Honour-James-Pickles.html

It's common sense surely?  Would you leave valuables on display in your car and/or leave it unlocked? 

I'm not suggesting women should be hidden away behind burkas to protect themselves from 'uncontrollable' male lust! 

Women can look attractive without being overtly sexual.

Regardless of the outdated opinions espoused by you, Judge Pickles and the gropers the reality is that men making assumptions about women run the risk of being disgraced and losing their jobs.
Accept nothing
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Offline Holly Goodhead

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Re: The latest political scandal; A wirchhunt or a necessary exposé?
« Reply #32 on: December 22, 2017, 02:24:33 PM »
Regardless of the outdated opinions espoused by you, Judge Pickles and the gropers the reality is that men making assumptions about women run the risk of being disgraced and losing their jobs.

G-Unit 'meet the women worried about #metoo'

http://www.spiked-online.com/newsite/article/meet-the-women-worried-about-metoo/20639#.Wj0Q3DfLjIU

Ironically one of the women happens to be none other than Julia Brewer-Hartley:

Julia Hartley-Brewer says…

The #MeToo campaign is very worrying and will achieve the opposite of what it pretends to want. The hashtag claims to be about empowering women to speak out when actually it is turning women into perpetual victims.

Women who put up with sexual harassment and keep quiet about it for years, protecting the perpetrators, are hailed as heroines and strong, powerful feminists. Yet, bizarrely, women who speak out and deal with sexual harassment forcefully at the time, and then happily move on with their lives as I and millions of other women have done over the years, are derided as ‘victim-blamers’ or even ‘rape apologists’. It’s almost as if a woman is only ‘the right kind of woman’ if she is willing to play the victim.

This is not what feminism was supposed to be about. It was supposed to be about empowering women, not infantilising them. Any woman can now point the finger at any man and make any claim she wants about something that may – or may not – have happened to her 10 or 20 years ago. That allegation, whether there is any evidence to back it up or not, is enough to end a man’s reputation, his career or even his life. We are seeing an end to the principles of natural justice, innocence until proven guilty and fair trials.

Make no mistake – this is a witch-hunt, and to hell with any innocent men who accidentally get caught in the net of the #MeToo outrage.

Julia is a journalist, broadcaster and host at talkRADIO.




How about this from Lionel Shriver:

I am concerned that we are throwing knee-touching into the same basket as rape, which does a grievous disservice to mere knee-touchers and rape victims both. I am concerned that we are increasingly wont to confuse genuine abuse of power in the workplace with often distant memories of men who have made failed – ‘unwanted’ – passes. In the complicated dance of courtship, someone has to make a move, and the way one conventionally discovers if one’s attraction is returned is to brave some gentle physical contact and perhaps accept rebuff. Were I still a young woman looking for a partner, I would not wish to live in world where a man had to secure a countersigned contract in triplicate before he kissed me.

I am concerned that we are casting women as irremediably scarred by even minor, casual advances, and as incapable of competently and sensitively handling the commonplace instances in which men are drawn to them sexually and the feeling doesn’t happen to be mutual.

I am concerned that sex itself seems increasingly to be seen as dirty, and as a violation, a form of assault, so that we’re repackaging an old prudery in progressive wrapping paper. I am concerned that we are well on our way to demonising, if not criminalising, all male desire.

Turbocharged by social media, #MeToo may have gone too far. Rather than bringing the sexes together with improved mutual understanding, we are in danger of driving the sexes apart. If I were a man right now, I’d lock the door of my study with the intention of satisfying myself with internet porn for the indefinite future. Real women would not seem worth the risk of destroying my career. Is that what we want?

Lionel is an author, most recently of The Standing Chandelier, and winner of the Orange Prize for Fiction.


Merry Christmas G-Unit 8((()*/
Justice 4 Sheila and Jeremy: victims of poorly arranged 'Baby Scoop Era' adoptions.  Australia has apologised
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5hVbokTpYeg time for UK to do the same https://www.theguardian.com/society/2016/nov/04/baby-adoption-practices-of-past-demand-inquiry-say-law-firms