Author Topic: Tannerman, Crècheman, Innocentman and now TOTman. Could you make it up?  (Read 634 times)

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Offline Eleanor

Here; scroll down and there's all the guest names.

http://www.mccannpjfiles.co.uk/PJ/TAPAS_BOOKING.htm

Why didn't The PJ do this?  I thought it was their day job, not mine.

Offline Miss Taken Identity

Here; scroll down and there's all the guest names.

http://www.mccannpjfiles.co.uk/PJ/TAPAS_BOOKING.htm


Well done G!...

We wonder who would make it up and why...@ Johns Question
'Never underestimate the power of stupid people'... George Carlin

Offline G-Unit

Why didn't The PJ do this?  I thought it was their day job, not mine.

I thought it was you who wondered if there were two Julians, not them?
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Offline Eleanor

I thought it was you who wondered if there were two Julians, not them?

You pointed out JULIAN.  But you didn't say which one.

Offline Carana

Why didn't The PJ do this?  I thought it was their day job, not mine.

I've asked this before: did the PJ ever check the evening crèche / night nanny records to see who could have been wandering around with a child in their arms that night?

Offline misty

I've asked this before: did the PJ ever check the evening crèche / night nanny records to see who could have been wandering around with a child in their arms that night?

The records aren't in the files -  so that's a yes from me.

Offline Robittybob1

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I've asked this before: did the PJ ever check the evening crèche / night nanny records to see who could have been wandering around with a child in their arms that night?
Somehow they knew the number of kids at the night creche, so I assume someone did have the records.
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https://www.youcaring.com/madeleinemccann-1080869

Offline G-Unit

Somehow they knew the number of kids at the night creche, so I assume someone did have the records.

I would be very surprised if the night creche records were kept for four years until OG came along. I think it's more likely that they examined the questionnaires received by LP and found the information there.

It seems that it wasn't just the PJ who never thought of the possibility that Jane had seen a holidaymaker, the UK policemen helping them didn't appear to think of of it either. 
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Offline Brietta

I would be very surprised if the night creche records were kept for four years until OG came along. I think it's more likely that they examined the questionnaires received by LP and found the information there.

It seems that it wasn't just the PJ who never thought of the possibility that Jane had seen a holidaymaker, the UK policemen helping them didn't appear to think of of it either.

It was a Portuguese investigation in which the Portuguese investigators had their feathers ruffled by their British counterparts 'trying to help'.

I don't really see how the Brits could be expected to 'interfere' in that in an atmosphere of such distrust and paranoia that the instruction was given to 'shadow' a senior British officer!

Under normal circumstances I would have disagreed that vital paperwork had been destroyed ... but if possible forensic opportunities could be sent to the laundry and others not bagged ... you may very well be correct.

I wonder how it would have gone down if the Brits had insisted on following up the action on Tannerman and Dr Totman ... not well I'm thinking.


Snip
:: The intervention of multiple UK police forces and agencies created "frustration" and "resentment" among Portuguese police.

:: The decision by the Association of Chief Police Officers to put Leicestershire Police in charge of the operation was a mistake because the force was ill-equipped to deal with such a big investigation.

:: Challenges to the Portuguese police's approach to the investigation led to warnings that Britain should not try to act as a "colonial power".

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

"It was unhelpful…I've no doubt relationships from the outset with the Portuguese were impacted by it and I think that had a long-term negative effect on the investigation."

Mr Gamble - who refuses to release the detail of his findings - said the initial Portuguese police response to Madeleine's disappearance was "haphazard" and that potentially crucial information had not been followed up.

https://news.sky.com/story/madeleine-secret-report-on-police-probe-10391226



Snip
He says the British police, the Diplomatic Service, the MI5 and even the NHS were blocking his path to the 'material truth'.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
We needed quick answers to the questions' - particularly from the English police whose tardiness he was already critcising.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Amaral was suspicious of the motives of the British police officers who arrived in Luz on

May 7. He ordered a 'shadow' on the senior British officer in Luz. 'I want to know what they are doing,' he told his subordinate. 'You will escort them day and night.'
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
As the British police urged caution, Amaral became ever more convinced of his theories. He rationalised that the UK police were reluctant to get drawn into a prosecution on foreign soil.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
The point is that the British force was still pursuing the possibility of a kidnap.

Tension between the two police forces had been growing for some time and in that month when the McCanns were declared suspects, it erupted.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
https://www.standard.co.uk/news/a-copper-without-shame-maddies-top-detective-blames-everyone-but-himself-6836324.html


The remit of Operation Grange is to investigate ...  "(as if the abduction occurred in the UK)"

Offline G-Unit

It was a Portuguese investigation in which the Portuguese investigators had their feathers ruffled by their British counterparts 'trying to help'.

I don't really see how the Brits could be expected to 'interfere' in that in an atmosphere of such distrust and paranoia that the instruction was given to 'shadow' a senior British officer!

Under normal circumstances I would have disagreed that vital paperwork had been destroyed ... but if possible forensic opportunities could be sent to the laundry and others not bagged ... you may very well be correct.

I wonder how it would have gone down if the Brits had insisted on following up the action on Tannerman and Dr Totman ... not well I'm thinking.


Snip
:: The intervention of multiple UK police forces and agencies created "frustration" and "resentment" among Portuguese police.

:: The decision by the Association of Chief Police Officers to put Leicestershire Police in charge of the operation was a mistake because the force was ill-equipped to deal with such a big investigation.

:: Challenges to the Portuguese police's approach to the investigation led to warnings that Britain should not try to act as a "colonial power".

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

"It was unhelpful…I've no doubt relationships from the outset with the Portuguese were impacted by it and I think that had a long-term negative effect on the investigation."

Mr Gamble - who refuses to release the detail of his findings - said the initial Portuguese police response to Madeleine's disappearance was "haphazard" and that potentially crucial information had not been followed up.

https://news.sky.com/story/madeleine-secret-report-on-police-probe-10391226



Snip
He says the British police, the Diplomatic Service, the MI5 and even the NHS were blocking his path to the 'material truth'.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
We needed quick answers to the questions' - particularly from the English police whose tardiness he was already critcising.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Amaral was suspicious of the motives of the British police officers who arrived in Luz on

May 7. He ordered a 'shadow' on the senior British officer in Luz. 'I want to know what they are doing,' he told his subordinate. 'You will escort them day and night.'
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
As the British police urged caution, Amaral became ever more convinced of his theories. He rationalised that the UK police were reluctant to get drawn into a prosecution on foreign soil.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
The point is that the British force was still pursuing the possibility of a kidnap.

Tension between the two police forces had been growing for some time and in that month when the McCanns were declared suspects, it erupted.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
https://www.standard.co.uk/news/a-copper-without-shame-maddies-top-detective-blames-everyone-but-himself-6836324.html

Yes, unfortunately the Brits managed to give the impression that they were interfering rather than helping.
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Confirm everything