Author Topic: Brexit from Irish perspective  (Read 1744 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline faithlilly

Re: Brexit from Irish perspective
« Reply #15 on: May 10, 2020, 03:34:48 PM »
Many, many years ago I had to point out to a rather racist radio presenter that Sikhs not Muslims wore turbans. In a multi-cultural society like ours you’d have thought that would have been common knowledge.

Offline Vertigo Swirl

Re: Brexit from Irish perspective
« Reply #16 on: May 10, 2020, 03:56:02 PM »
Afghanistan


Turbans are part of the national dress in Afghanistan. They are used more widely here than elsewhere in the Muslim world, and are worn in a wide range of styles and colours. In the country's south-east, turbans are wrapped loosely and largely, whereas in Kabul the garment tends to be smaller and tighter. In traditional Afghan society, a related piece of extra cloth called a patu serves practical purposes, such as for wrapping oneself against the cold, to sit on, to tie up an animal or to carry water in the cap. Different ethnic groups in Afghanistan wear different lungees with different patterns, way of styling it, fabric, stripes, lengths and colouration. Males of all ethnic backgrounds generally avoid wearing bright-coloured turbans that draw attention to oneself and prefer wearing simple colors that are white, off white, gray, dark blue and black
ANGER MAKES US AWARE OF INJUSTICE
We often experience anger when we are denied rights or when faced with insults, disrespect, injustice, or exploitation. Anger serves as an internal guidance system that indicates something is not quite right, that someone has treated us unjustly or unfairly. Anger helps communicate to others: “You’d better treat me fairly; otherwise, you’ll pay a high cost.” On a global level, standing up for a lack of fairness can prevent people from taking advantage of others. This type of anger can bring about positive change in society and increase the social cost of misbehaving.
The value of anger https://www.goodtherapy.org/blog/value-of-anger-16-reasons-its-good-to-get-angry-0313175


Offline Vertigo Swirl

Re: Brexit from Irish perspective
« Reply #18 on: May 10, 2020, 04:43:25 PM »
I lived for many years in a Muslim country which had its fair share of Sikhs too.  The only men wearing turbans there were the Sikhs, my dad’s driver being one such.  The Muslims generally wore Songkoks, but only on special or formal occasions.  I really don’t need educating on the subject.  Turbans however, is a generic term for male headdress such as that worn by Osama Bin Laden and the Taliban, and by many other Muslim men throughout the world.  It is that to which I was referring, not the Sikh turban (also known as a Pagri or Dastar, more specifically), for anyone who though otherwise.  Hope that’s cleared up that little “misunderstanding “. 
ANGER MAKES US AWARE OF INJUSTICE
We often experience anger when we are denied rights or when faced with insults, disrespect, injustice, or exploitation. Anger serves as an internal guidance system that indicates something is not quite right, that someone has treated us unjustly or unfairly. Anger helps communicate to others: “You’d better treat me fairly; otherwise, you’ll pay a high cost.” On a global level, standing up for a lack of fairness can prevent people from taking advantage of others. This type of anger can bring about positive change in society and increase the social cost of misbehaving.
The value of anger https://www.goodtherapy.org/blog/value-of-anger-16-reasons-its-good-to-get-angry-0313175

Offline faithlilly

Re: Brexit from Irish perspective
« Reply #19 on: May 10, 2020, 05:04:31 PM »
I lived for many years in a Muslim country which had its fair share of Sikhs too.  The only men wearing turbans there were the Sikhs, my dad’s driver being one such.  The Muslims generally wore Songkoks, but only on special or formal occasions.  I really don’t need educating on the subject.  Turbans however, is a generic term for male headdress such as that worn by Osama Bin Laden and the Taliban, and by many other Muslim men throughout the world.  It is that to which I was referring, not the Sikh turban (also known as a Pagri or Dastar, more specifically), for anyone who though otherwise.  Hope that’s cleared up that little “misunderstanding “.

Of course, of course.

Offline Vertigo Swirl

Re: Brexit from Irish perspective
« Reply #20 on: August 21, 2021, 10:49:34 PM »
“We are not about to give this up because of some Kalashnikov-wielding bumpkins in turbans,” said one of (Afghanistan’s) first female rappers (re: the Taliban).


https://www.thetimes.co.uk/article/were-not-about-to-give-this-all-up-for-some-kalashnikov-wielding-bumpkins-in-turbans-7pvrxj6s9

Vindicated!
ANGER MAKES US AWARE OF INJUSTICE
We often experience anger when we are denied rights or when faced with insults, disrespect, injustice, or exploitation. Anger serves as an internal guidance system that indicates something is not quite right, that someone has treated us unjustly or unfairly. Anger helps communicate to others: “You’d better treat me fairly; otherwise, you’ll pay a high cost.” On a global level, standing up for a lack of fairness can prevent people from taking advantage of others. This type of anger can bring about positive change in society and increase the social cost of misbehaving.
The value of anger https://www.goodtherapy.org/blog/value-of-anger-16-reasons-its-good-to-get-angry-0313175