Author Topic: Sir Keir Starmer Appointed Leader Of The Labour Party  (Read 4540 times)

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Offline Brietta

Re: Sir Keir Starmer Appointed Leader Of The Labour Party
« Reply #15 on: April 05, 2020, 05:54:31 PM »
I believe those wheels are already in motion.

Time to share the blame 😛
The remit of Operation Grange is to investigate ...  "(as if the abduction occurred in the UK)"

Offline faithlilly

Re: Sir Keir Starmer Appointed Leader Of The Labour Party
« Reply #16 on: April 05, 2020, 05:58:22 PM »
Time to share the blame 😛

My thoughts exactly.

Offline Vertigo Swirl

Re: Sir Keir Starmer Appointed Leader Of The Labour Party
« Reply #17 on: April 05, 2020, 06:05:10 PM »
I don't think he is the type to ignore the writing on the wall as previous governments obviously have done http://miscarriageofjustice.co/index.php?board=94.0 but from that starting point I think now is not the time to be 'sorting it out' the time for preparing to do so has been squandered.
I think the best that Starmer can do is as he says, to support the government when he thinks it is appropriate to do so and to make the case when it is not. To do that adequately he must be kept up to speed with developments and options as they occur in this time of National emergency. 

Does anyone know if there is provision for the leader of the opposition to be included in that?
He has already been invited and accepted the invitation I believe, something Corbyn was not interested in doing.
Mare's eat oat's and doe's eat oat's and little lamb's eat ivy.

Offline faithlilly

Re: Sir Keir Starmer Appointed Leader Of The Labour Party
« Reply #18 on: April 05, 2020, 06:42:01 PM »
He has already been invited and accepted the invitation I believe, something Corbyn was not interested in doing.

Move on VS.

Offline Eleanor

Re: Sir Keir Starmer Appointed Leader Of The Labour Party
« Reply #19 on: April 05, 2020, 06:44:32 PM »
Starmer’s mother was a nurse and father a toolmaker...you don’t get much more working class than that. He pulled himself up by his bootstraps and made the most of his chances.

I aso am  Working Class, although you might be forgiven for missing that.  I got no help from my family.  But that is another story.





« Last Edit: April 05, 2020, 08:20:09 PM by Brietta »

Offline Miss Taken Identity

Re: Sir Keir Starmer Appointed Leader Of The Labour Party
« Reply #20 on: April 05, 2020, 06:54:23 PM »
Starmer’s mother was a nurse and father a toolmaker...you don’t get much more working class than that. He pulled himself up by his bootstraps and made the most of his chances.

There is nothing wrong with that- I applaud it. However, the labour party is awash with academic lefty luvvie agendas, hardly working class issues to be addressed among the mainstream of Political view in the UK.

I would love to be proved wrong!
'Never underestimate the power of stupid people'... George Carlin

Offline faithlilly

Re: Sir Keir Starmer Appointed Leader Of The Labour Party
« Reply #21 on: April 05, 2020, 07:09:15 PM »
There is nothing wrong with that- I applaud it. However, the labour party is awash with academic lefty luvvie agendas, hardly working class issues to be addressed among the mainstream of Political view in the UK.

I would love to be proved wrong!

Agendas such as ?

Offline Eleanor

Re: Sir Keir Starmer Appointed Leader Of The Labour Party
« Reply #22 on: April 05, 2020, 08:13:21 PM »
Keir Starmer has been elected as the new leader of the Opposition, Eleanor, replacing Jeremy Corbyn.

Yer, I got that.  I just wasn't sure for why.  I half hoped that some duckhead would win.  Silly really because I don't actually care.  You can all have it.

My father was Labour to the heart and soul of him and never forgave me for voting Conservative.  In fact he left all of his vast accumilalated wealth to my brother.  I got not one penny.  And if that isn't a laugh and a half then I don't know what is.

It was about Two Million.  So much for the Labour Party.   My father had three brothers who never married.  All mathematicians to the core.

And me as well.  But I think they all missed that in some inconsequential Girl Child.  They didn't see that I was just the same as them.

Never mind.  Manipulating money was always much more fun than actually spending it, although my experience is somewhat limited.



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Offline Eleanor

Re: Sir Keir Starmer Appointed Leader Of The Labour Party
« Reply #23 on: April 05, 2020, 11:28:03 PM »

It is all very boring now so I will treat you all to one of my Blogs.

The dearly beloved Wisteria that I was going to decimate has just stopped me dead in my tracks.  It has never had so many flower buds before.  Ever.
I always cut it back in January, but too much rain this year.  So now I have this awful glory that I cannot kill.  Even my hard bitten son can't do this.  I said to him today, okay, you do this.  You kill all of those lovely cascading flowers.  But even he can't do i

Wisteria is an horrible Weed.  Three weeks is all you ever get.  But at least this year is going to be a good  one.
.
The rotten little swine  remains utterly dreadful.  I have never owned such an awful dog.  Or such  a sweet one.  He is a monster Who loves every body and thinks that everybody loves him.

O'Connor has no conception of  wrecking my garden.  And i can no longer be asked to care.

I much like a few more of  you than You might think  i just need to see some good manners of which you are all  capable.

 I know most  of you better than you  onow
         



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Offline faithlilly

Re: Sir Keir Starmer Appointed Leader Of The Labour Party
« Reply #24 on: April 06, 2020, 04:13:55 PM »
Good to see Rebecca Long-Bailey has been given a place in Starmer’s shadow cabinet.

Offline Vertigo Swirl

Re: Sir Keir Starmer Appointed Leader Of The Labour Party
« Reply #25 on: April 16, 2020, 07:41:22 AM »
Good article by a man who has always written alot of sense.

author-image
Labour still tainted by Corbyn’s grim legacy
Sir Keir Starmer has made a bold start but his party won’t be trusted until he turns his back on the deluded hard left

David Aaronovitch
Thursday April 16 2020, 12.00am, The Times
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‘The Labour Party is in turmoil,” wrote the editor of the Labourlist website, Sienna Rodgers, this week. And Ms Rodgers is someone who knows her Labour Party. And readers may wonder how Labour can possibly have the energy to be in turmoil a fortnight into a new leadership and in the middle of a global emergency. Quite easily, as it turns out.

The first thing Sir Keir Starmer did after his victory was to contact Jewish organisations. It was an exercise in thick line-drawing. He apologised for the [ censored word]emitism in Labour’s ranks, committed himself to rooting it out and did it in words that made clear he meant it. No evasive guff about “opposing all forms of racism”. His message was: that was then, this is now.

But a few days later “then” returned with a vengeance.

First, though, a little necessary history. After Jeremy Corbyn was elected Labour leader in 2015 his acolytes struggled to gain control of the party machine. But a failed leadership challenge by moderates the following year enabled his Momentum and trade union allies to gain a majority on the ruling national executive committee (NEC) and to install a hard-left general secretary.

More recently, the Corbyn ascendancy found itself accused of tolerating [ censored word]emitism among some party members. Last year, following a spate of allegations, the Equality and Human Rights Commission opened an investigation into the party.


Which brings us to the extraordinary internal report, probably written by Corbynista staffers, that recently leaked. It’s a blatant attempt to shift the blame for Labour’s failure to tackle [ censored word]emitism from Corbyn and his general secretary Jennie Formby, to the previous leadership of Ed Miliband. It also contains vast amounts of ostensibly private chatter (unredacted) between former Labour staffers hostile to Corbyn, some of which is couched in vivid terms, that has thrilled the hard left. Their websites, alternative media centres and social media accounts have erupted in delighted outrage.

Some of them think it explains the otherwise inexplicable decision of the British people not to choose Mr Corbyn as prime minister. The new Corbynite MP for Coventry South, Zarah Sultana, wrote: “Just think. If it wasn’t for their sabotage, we would have won [the election] in 2017, Jeremy would be PM. But these people [the former Labour staffers] preferred a Tory victory instead.” One Corbynite commentator said the report showed that Labour officials had “actively conspired for the party to lose the 2017 election”, making this “a Watergate moment, not just for Labour but for British politics”. And so on.

In their eagerness to believe such nonsense, these people failed to notice the report’s own preamble that it “thoroughly disproves any suggestion that [ censored word]emitism is not a problem in the party, or that it is all a ‘smear’ or a ‘witch-hunt’. The report’s findings prove the scale of the problem . . .”

The inconvenient truth is that in their heyday the Corbynistas denied there was a problem and insisted it was got up by shadowy forces to “hurt Jeremy”. Some of those complained about were, after all, their dearest and oldest comrades. But as the row deepened and it became obvious that some very rotten apples had infiltrated the barrel, the more pragmatic ones decided to concede that some bad things had been said and done. And their old (and now embarrassing) friends were marched off into noisy oblivion. Now, it seems, the plan is to shift the blame, however improbably, on to the party organisation inherited from Ed Miliband.

This belief in their own virtue is key to the psychology of the hard left. In the short time since their candidate for leader, Rebecca Long Bailey, was trounced by Starmer, they have been desperate to assert that a) her defeat was just a victory cleverly disguised and b) that the new leader still needs them. “Our time will come”, concluded a recent Momentum statement, incidentally echoing a favourite Provisional Sinn Fein slogan from the bad old days. It happens.

Actually, their time has gone. Sir Keir, scarred by the behaviour of Corbyn supporters in his own constituency party and on the NEC, has responded by purging them from practically every position they hold. Of 97 new shadow appointments, almost none are from the Corbyn wing. In this ruthlessness, Starmer has startled me, just as the failure of the Momentum machine to get enough votes for Long Bailey surprised me.

He may have ordered an inquiry into the leaked report but what is becoming evident is that Starmer believes the 2019 election was a 1983-style watershed moment for Labour. The illusions fostered during the Corbyn leadership have dissolved in the acid storm of Boris Johnson’s 80-seat landslide. In the most recent NEC elections the centre left has won ground over the hard left. Reality is starting to bite.

What’s more, the corona crisis changes the political landscape as much as it changes the economic and psychological ones. But not in easily predictable ways. It is useless simply to project old political templates on to the post-pandemic world.

Yesterday, Starmer talked of a “re-evaluation” of our society adding, “clearly, we’re going to have to reimagine our economy”. Yes indeed. But in the circumstances not of a cornucopia of cash available for pet projects and redistribution, but in conditions of recession or low growth. Also, I’d argue, in a situation where the need for transnational co-operation and action has never been more obvious.

If we want a larger, more embracing state sector (which a lot of surprising people now do) to save the economy, and we want effective measures to end low pay without creating mass unemployment, then promising to bash up “the rich”, as the Corbynistas dreamt of doing, won’t cut it. Nor will subsidising middle-class students, nationalising broadband or abolishing universal credit. The country has to discuss moving to a society where most of us pay more in tax, some of it on wealth, to afford to be the post-virus society we aspire to.

But Labour, possibly working with others, can only champion this successfully if people believe that the party is competent. That its leaders solve problems rather than spout slogans. The bring-your-own-loudhailer-and-placard party is over.
Mare's eat oat's and doe's eat oat's and little lamb's eat ivy.

Offline Vertigo Swirl

Re: Sir Keir Starmer Appointed Leader Of The Labour Party
« Reply #26 on: April 24, 2020, 05:41:27 PM »
From Matthew Parris article in tomorrow’s Times

“On BBC Radio 4’s Today programme this morning I heard an interview with Labour’s home affairs spokesman, Nick Thomas-Symonds, MP. Discussing the possible ending of lockdown, he told the programme’s Justin Webb that the government “urgently need to start having the conversation with the British public”. So Mr Webb tried to start one: “Do we need to have a conversation about the fact that more people might die as a result of a reduction in restrictions but that we may decide that that is a price we have to pay?” Instantly, Thomas-Symonds ducked. “Well I think that the government’s first duty is always to save lives,” he said, then burbled away on a different subject. Webb gave up”.

So just what ARE Labour (who obviously know much better than the Tories how to manage this crisis) suggesting with regard to the easing of the lockdown?  Ease restrictions which will inevitably lead to more deaths or keep us in lockdown until a vaccine or cure has been developed?  Same question to all armchair knowitalls.
Mare's eat oat's and doe's eat oat's and little lamb's eat ivy.

Offline Carana

Re: Sir Keir Starmer Appointed Leader Of The Labour Party
« Reply #27 on: April 24, 2020, 06:48:26 PM »
What I'm gathering from European media seems to be variations on a phased-in concept.

Everyone on masks (even if home-made). Social distancing rules seem to vary quite a bit, but people will be expected to behave.

Some businesses allowed to open (but not restaurants, bars in most countries for the moment). No mass events for a while.

Austria had a clear plan with letting some types of businesses to restart, then a 2-week wait before letting a few more types to open, and so on. The rationale is that if cases start to soar at any stage, then it would be easier to cut back.

Schools seem to vary widely - not sure they've all thought through how it would work in practice yet.

« Last Edit: April 24, 2020, 06:50:49 PM by Carana »

Offline Vertigo Swirl

Re: Sir Keir Starmer Appointed Leader Of The Labour Party
« Reply #28 on: April 24, 2020, 06:56:25 PM »
What I'm gathering from European media seems to be variations on a phased-in concept.

Everyone on masks (even if home-made). Social distancing rules seem to vary quite a bit, but people will be expected to behave.

Some businesses allowed to open (but not restaurants, bars in most countries for the moment). No mass events for a while.

Austria had a clear plan with letting some types of businesses to restart, then a 2-week wait before letting a few more types to open, and so on. The rationale is that if cases start to soar at any stage, then it would be easier to cut back.

Schools seem to vary widely - not sure they've all thought through how it would work in practice yet.
Several countries have seen a second wave after relaxing controls slightly, the likelihood is the virus will return too later in the year when more deaths will be inevitable.  Should we start blaming the government for these deaths now, or wait till they happen, which they will if the lockdown is relaxed?
Mare's eat oat's and doe's eat oat's and little lamb's eat ivy.

Offline Carana

Re: Sir Keir Starmer Appointed Leader Of The Labour Party
« Reply #29 on: April 24, 2020, 07:40:00 PM »
Several countries have seen a second wave after relaxing controls slightly, the likelihood is the virus will return too later in the year when more deaths will be inevitable.  Should we start blaming the government for these deaths now, or wait till they happen, which they will if the lockdown is relaxed?

Every country is likely to face waves. Hopefully, the UK will be a bit more up to speed. But then there's Brexit that's got to somehow get done, and I really don't see how the civil service will be able to cope with both.