Author Topic: The Boris Bounce and all the Benefits of Brexit  (Read 29939 times)

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Offline Venturi Swirl

Re: The Boris Bounce and all the Benefits of Brexit
« Reply #210 on: August 30, 2022, 12:48:13 PM »
Interestingly 52% of people now think Brexit was a mistake with only 36% of people thinking it was the right thing to do
https://www.statista.com/statistics/987347/brexit-opinion-poll/
If a fox said it was a chicken, would you put it in a hen house?

Offline Carana

Re: The Boris Bounce and all the Benefits of Brexit
« Reply #211 on: August 30, 2022, 08:09:07 PM »
I think the fishermen voted because they thought it would mean they would regain their fishing waters and thus make them better off.  I think many in red wall areas voted Brexit to reduce immigration and keep British jobs for British people.  I think farmers voted for Brexit because they thought it would open up more markets for them and mean less bureaucracy.  I think I think some businessmen voted for Brexit for the same reasons.  I think many people voted for Brexit because they thought it would be better to channel the money we spent as part of our membership on improving the NHS and other infrastructure.  I think many who voted for Brexit did so because they were under the impression that we would be unshackled from European Law and be able to do as we pleased, rather than what Europe told us and that that in turn would make this country great again.  So, yes I think many people voted for Brexit because they thought it would improve their lot, not make life more difficult and more expensive.  I did say at the time however (and got roundly criticised by you for saying it iirc) that the turkeys were voting for Christmas, and so far at any rate, this would seem to be the case.  But still we have our sovereignty and our blue (black) passports which undoubtedly makes up for all the negatives.  By the way  what has "having our sovereignty" actually meant for the average person in this country?

More sewage.

Offline Venturi Swirl

Re: The Boris Bounce and all the Benefits of Brexit
« Reply #212 on: January 17, 2023, 10:45:59 PM »
The penny appears finally to have dropped in the Pro-Brexit camp.  Yes, we hate to say we told you so, but…we told you so…


Brexit is doomed, says Boris Johnson’s favourite paper
‘The project is probably now unsalvageable’, says former PM’s old employer

Adam Forrest8 hours ago
Sign up to our free Brexit and beyond email for the latest headlines on what Brexit is meaning for the UK


The Conservatives have made such a “hash” of Brexit that the project is probably “unsalvageable”, according to Boris Johnson’s favourite newspaper.

An editorial column in The Telegraph – where Mr Johnson formerly worked and known to be his favoured newspaper – suggested that Brexit was now doomed to failure.

Admitting “almost nothing has been achieved”, the Brexit-backing newspaper added: “With no plan to unleash its potential, it can only fester, stoking tensions in Northern Ireland and strangling small firms with red tape.”

“It is time for the Leave camp to start saying the unsayable: the Tories have made such a hash of Brexit that the project is probably now unsalvageable,” it added.

The column marks the rise of so-called “Bregret” or “Regrexit”, with polls indicating that many Leave voters believe Brexit is going badly and a growing number are in favour of rejoining the EU.

One in three Tory voters (33 per cent) believe Brexit has created more problems than it has solved, an Opinium survey in early January. A separate YouGov poll found 30 per cent of Leave voters said the UK should now forge closer ties with Brussels.

Poling guru Sir John Curtis said his own poll-of-polls analysis shows support for rejoining the EU at 57 per cent and staying out at 43 per cent if another referendum was held, having steadily risen over the past year.

Former Brexit secretary David Davis admitted in November that leaving had not delivered any “major” economic benefits. And fellow Tory MP Andrew Bowie – now a trade minister – previously admitted that young people may not “reap the benefits” of Brexit.

Tory MP Tobias Ellwood raised eyebrows in June by suggesting the UK could rejoin the EU’s single market to ease the cost of living crisis, saying he was “daring” the think outside the box.

“I fear that it is more likely that we end up re-joining the EU – and sooner than many people think,” wrote The Telegraph’s Sherelle Jacobs. “Not for the reasons the alt-Remainers believe, best expressed through their favourite cliche: nobody voted to be poorer.

“The real problem is that nobody voted for nothing to change. And Brexit has not brought about the kind of national reset that millions of people expected. Instead, it is beginning to look slightly rubbish, even pointless.”

It comes as a new joint report by top economic think tanks found that post-Brexit rules have led to a shortfall of around 330,000 workers in the UK and had helped fuel inflation.

The ending of free movement is “contributing significantly” to current labour shortages, the study by the UK in a Changing Europe and the Centre for European Reform found.

The academics found that low-skilled sectors – including hospitality, retail, construction and transportation – had been badly hit by the loss of EU workers after Brexit.

“Overall, the new system is working broadly as Leave advocates promised,” said co-authors Prof Jonathan Portes and John Springford, who said visa rules were “too onerous to compensate for the loss of free movement in low-skilled sectors of the economy”.

Meanwhile, Asda chair Stuart Rose said on Tuesday the UK was suffering from the “catastrophic” impact of Brexit and should consider a closer trading relationship with Brussels.

“I can smell it – we have suffered. We are the only economy I think in the G7, possibly in the G20, who has actually not yet recovered to pre-Covid levels. That tells you something,” Lord Rose told LBC.

The Tory peer said trade between the UK and the EU was “not flowing smoothly”, adding: “We can call it the Mickey Mouse agreement as far as I’m concerned. What we need to do is we need to have a stronger trading relationship.”
If a fox said it was a chicken, would you put it in a hen house?

Offline Venturi Swirl

Re: The Boris Bounce and all the Benefits of Brexit
« Reply #213 on: January 31, 2023, 09:20:34 AM »
Good ol’ Brexit…

“UK economy to shrink and perform worse than Russia, says IMF”

The UK is on course to be the world’s worst-performing big economy this year, according to the International Monetary Fund.

In an update to its growth outlook, the IMF delivered a hefty blow to Britain’s prospects despite brightening global conditions, with a 0.9 percentage point downgrade to the UK’s annual growth projection year.

It expects the economy to contract by 0.6 per cent in 2023, which would make Britain the slowest-growing big economy in the world. The Russian economy is expected to grow by 0.3 per cent this year after a 2.2 per cent contraction in 2022.
If a fox said it was a chicken, would you put it in a hen house?

Offline Carana

Re: The Boris Bounce and all the Benefits of Brexit
« Reply #214 on: January 31, 2023, 11:09:02 PM »
The Davis Downside Dossier
UPDATED. David Davis famously said there would be no downsides to Brexit only considerable upsides. Here we keep a tally.
Yorkshire BylinesbyYorkshire Bylines
01-01-2021 04:01 - Updated on 31-01-2023 19:26https://yorkshirebylines.co.uk/regular-features/the-davis-downside-dossier/

So far the tally is 23 upsides (although one of them is that the EU has become more popular in most member states).

Downsides... 909 so far.