Author Topic: Brexit  (Read 6821 times)

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Offline Miss Taken Identity

Re: Brexit
« Reply #90 on: February 24, 2021, 07:14:40 PM »
Very helpful I'm sure. 
It's clear to me that those who voted for Brexit didn't have a clue what it would mean in practical terms for trade between the EU and the UK and that they reallydon't care if it has a negative impact anyway.  As long as the "will of the people" was carried out, as long as "we got our sovereignty back", as long as we can now "control our borders", as long as we can "take back control" the rest can go to shit.


The facts is there are winners and losers.  I don't buy Dutch goods at all- so saving money on my clogs and tulips!

After the initial shock the EU will come round and realise they have bit off their noses to spite their face- The jab and financial markets being just two wee embarrassing situations for them... The Germans envy us! The French want us to bail their euro tunnel business which will collaps... Not looking all the great on the other side of the  channel. Still wanna re join when other countries want to leave- EU -It will implode!
'Never underestimate the power of stupid people'... George Carlin

Offline Carana

Re: Brexit
« Reply #91 on: April 16, 2021, 03:31:32 PM »
Thanks I know all that, my point is anyone in the EU buying anything from UK small businesses priced at over 21 euros is liable to face VAT and a large handling charge.  Obviously my customer in Holland is unlikely to ever purchase from me again if they know that their goods are likely to cost another 20 odd euros on top of the price they've already paid and will source their goods from within the EU in future.  How is this Brexit deal advantageous to small businesses like mine?  Once you've figured it out, do be sure to let me know, ta.

Lucky you don't export cheese...
https://twitter.com/SimonJSpurrell

Or oysters... or...
https://www.npr.org/2021/04/02/983925042/the-impact-of-brexit-is-being-felt-across-britain-down-to-oysters-wine-and-chees

« Last Edit: April 16, 2021, 03:43:34 PM by Carana »

Offline G-Unit

Re: Brexit
« Reply #92 on: May 08, 2021, 10:29:37 AM »
Judging by the latest voting, it seems that Boris is still reaping his reward for being strong enough to deliver Brexit. The Labour Party is still reaping it's deserts for being unable to make the same decision.
England - good effort

Offline Vertigo Swirl

Re: Brexit
« Reply #93 on: May 08, 2021, 05:07:36 PM »
Judging by the latest voting, it seems that Boris is still reaping his reward for being strong enough to deliver Brexit. The Labour Party is still reaping it's deserts for being unable to make the same decision.
I think you mean desserts, though in this case deserts is probably more appropriate.
I no longer read nor reply to posts made by those posters I perceive to be WUMS and TROLLS so if you think I'm ignoring you this may be the reason.  Best wishes.

Offline Erngath

Re: Brexit
« Reply #94 on: May 08, 2021, 05:19:35 PM »
Judging by the latest voting, it seems that Boris is still reaping his reward for being strong enough to deliver Brexit. The Labour Party is still reaping it's deserts for being unable to make the same decision.


Neither Boris or the Labour party are reaping any rewards here.
Deal with the failings of others as gently as with your own.

Offline Vertigo Swirl

Re: Brexit
« Reply #95 on: May 08, 2021, 05:26:14 PM »
Labour is no longer the party of the working class, it’s the party of students and middle class socialists who spend all day long virtue signalling about identity politics on social media.   And that is why they no longer win seats in places like Hartlepool because most people there are not students, are not middle class and don’t give a stuff about transgender rights. 
I no longer read nor reply to posts made by those posters I perceive to be WUMS and TROLLS so if you think I'm ignoring you this may be the reason.  Best wishes.

Offline G-Unit

Re: Brexit
« Reply #96 on: May 08, 2021, 05:56:33 PM »

Neither Boris or the Labour party are reaping any rewards here.

Are you thinking of the UK or of the bit of it where you live?
England - good effort

Offline G-Unit

Re: Brexit
« Reply #97 on: May 08, 2021, 06:03:28 PM »
Labour is no longer the party of the working class, it’s the party of students and middle class socialists who spend all day long virtue signalling about identity politics on social media.   And that is why they no longer win seats in places like Hartlepool because most people there are not students, are not middle class and don’t give a stuff about transgender rights.

I agree. It was the Brexit issue which highlighted it as the Party publicly tore itself apart.

England - good effort

Offline Vertigo Swirl

Re: Brexit
« Reply #98 on: May 08, 2021, 06:10:16 PM »
I agree. It was the Brexit issue which highlighted it as the Party publicly tore itself apart.
The irony is Corbyn was a secret Brexit supporter.  He had the perfect opportunity to be true to himself and to voters and win the last election on a pledge to deliver Brexit but instead he had to fudge it to placate all the students and middle class socialist remainers who were the ones following him around the country massaging his ego and singing “Ooh, Jeremy Corbyn” at him as if he was the new messiah. 
I no longer read nor reply to posts made by those posters I perceive to be WUMS and TROLLS so if you think I'm ignoring you this may be the reason.  Best wishes.

Offline Carana

Re: Brexit
« Reply #99 on: May 08, 2021, 06:46:58 PM »
Aside from so-called "teething problems", 5 years on, I'm still bewildered as to what Brexit was intended to achieve.

Offline Vertigo Swirl

Re: Brexit
« Reply #100 on: May 08, 2021, 07:02:45 PM »
Aside from so-called "teething problems", 5 years on, I'm still bewildered as to what Brexit was intended to achieve.
I voted Remain, and have been in numerous Remainer versus Leaver discussions / arguments.  It is quite clear to me that in essence the only thing Brexit was intended to achieve was to stick two fingers up to Europe, borne out of a distrust and dislike of the EU, and of our neighbours’ conduct during WWII and for that mythical holy grail of “taking back control “.  It has certainly succeeded in the first objective, the second objective is less easy to pin down IMo but I suspect the majority of Brexiteers feel that this objective has also been successfully delivered.  And that’s it basically.  No Brexiteer cares if we are worse off as a result, or if trade declines, or if the Union is dissolved, they really REALLY don’t care.  It’s 100% ideological.
I no longer read nor reply to posts made by those posters I perceive to be WUMS and TROLLS so if you think I'm ignoring you this may be the reason.  Best wishes.

Offline Vertigo Swirl

Re: Brexit
« Reply #101 on: May 08, 2021, 07:30:02 PM »
Absolutely bang on the money from Janice Turner (a Labour voter herself)

For Labour, purity matters more than votes
Janice Turner
to the electorate,” says poor, honourable Sir Keir Starmer, an uneasy campaign show-pony, whose eyes filled last week saying he’d fight for every vote. But Labour won’t listen. Or it will take notes and nod along, then do what it always does: think it knows better. Why else pick a Remain zealot as your candidate in a seat like Hartlepool that voted 70-30 for Brexit? “Oh, they’re too thick to notice.”
The trouble for Labour is that the Conservative Party does listen. Not greatly attached to any version of itself, it shape-shifts to keep power. Is Thatcherism leaving a nasty-party taste? Try some liberal-consensus Cameron balm. Its most audacious trick is to present itself as the solution to the very problems it caused. For austerity-ravaged Tees Valley it offered Ben Houchen. A decade ago, George Osborne sought to privatise national forests and the blood bank but Houchen got the local airport back into public hands.

Yet he also champions a free port. Because Tories are pragmatic: state and private, pick and mix. Defending Corbyn’s legacy, John McDonnell noted that Boris Johnson had pinched his green energy deal and was quietly renationalising the railways. Of course! If it polls well, if it might actually work, Tories will steal it. The left, in its rigid ideological thinking, cannot grasp this magpie mindset. Instead, it believes “public sector good, private bad” while the vaccine programme’s success came from an alchemy between venture capital and the NHS.

Those saying red wall Tories are turkeys voting for Christmas should remember the same voters put up with decades of smooth, seat-seeking Labour special advisers who loved the fat Labour majorities of the north but couldn’t stand the locals. They were loyal dogs, to be thrown the odd investment bone. Brexit exposed Labour’s distaste for its own people and, long after Britain’s EU departure, it hangs like a smell.

No one votes for a party that hates you. Who does Labour love-bomb? The unemployed, the young, gig workers, the struggling, the poor. But in Hartlepool, houses are cheap: a couple with two average salaries can own a home and car. They want holidays, a new kitchen, a bottle of wine with dinner. They are “working class, middle class”: their lives aren’t comfortable but nor are they hell and, while they hope their kids go to university, they retain unfashionable values of patriotism, self-reliance, material aspiration.

Yet all they hear from Labour is chiding and judgment: they are not good enough, pure enough. Their cars cause the “environmental emergency”, their unfamiliarity with arcane language makes them bigots, their Brexit vote renders them deplorable ever more. So if a Tory candidate comes along, not only eager to be liked but able to secure Westminster cash for real stuff like factories or business parks, rather than just hashtags and rainbow flags, they’d be dumb not to listen. A red wall Tory must stay on his toes, might try harder to deliver, since he can’t take votes for granted — for now — or he’s out.

What was Labour for at these elections? It was against dodgy government procurement and Carrie’s wallpaper. Yet even in London, loyalists sighed as we set off to re-elect Mayor Khan. Normally sensible friends put Count Binface first, Labour second. A senior local government figure notes of the count’s vow to cap the price of croissants at a quid: “He has a better retail offer than Sadiq’s 100 pages of waffle.” Working with Khan “it was hard to know his passions, what he wanted to achieve”. Mutual hatred with Tory central government didn’t help, but “he never tried to reach out beyond party lines, which a mayor must do”. Such tribalism plays well in a Labour Party proud never to have kissed a Tory. Where are the woke points in co-operating with leaders of Conservative boroughs? Despite his lamentable record on knife crime and the Hammersmith Bridge chaos, Khan will win in young, diverse, graduate-heavy London.

To voters beyond, the ones Labour must convince, pragmatism is not only effective but hugely attractive. Yet it requires Labour Remainers to embrace Britain’s future rather than to harp on about the halcyon EU, like colonialists nostalgic for the Raj. Even more impossible it needs a warmer, less ideological message from its activist base. A common Twitter phrase is “get in the bin”. That’s where you belong if your views on immigration, gender or a myriad issues deviate from the line. Pretty soon, every voter will be in the bin.

The saddest thing is that out there somewhere is a young, brilliant, optimistic, inspiring, persuasive person, progressive but inclusive, warm but tough, who could lead Labour to victory. (A northerner would help.) But the very factors that make them electable to the country make them unselectable to the party. Sir Keir, who outwitted the hard left by keeping his moderate cards close, could yet be the best hope. To see another Labour victory, I might need, like my father, to live a long life.
I no longer read nor reply to posts made by those posters I perceive to be WUMS and TROLLS so if you think I'm ignoring you this may be the reason.  Best wishes.

Offline G-Unit

Re: Brexit
« Reply #102 on: May 08, 2021, 08:50:36 PM »
The irony is Corbyn was a secret Brexit supporter.  He had the perfect opportunity to be true to himself and to voters and win the last election on a pledge to deliver Brexit but instead he had to fudge it to placate all the students and middle class socialist remainers who were the ones following him around the country massaging his ego and singing “Ooh, Jeremy Corbyn” at him as if he was the new messiah.

When Blair became leader he unashamedly purged those who didn't agree with his 'New Labour' vision. Corbyn seemed to lack that killer instinct.
England - good effort

Offline Erngath

Re: Brexit
« Reply #103 on: May 08, 2021, 09:40:27 PM »
Are you thinking of the UK or of the bit of it where you live?

Most definitely " the bit" where we  live.
Deal with the failings of others as gently as with your own.

Offline Vertigo Swirl

Re: Brexit
« Reply #104 on: May 08, 2021, 10:00:28 PM »
When Blair became leader he unashamedly purged those who didn't agree with his 'New Labour' vision. Corbyn seemed to lack that killer instinct.
It wasn’t the only thing he lacked IMO.
I no longer read nor reply to posts made by those posters I perceive to be WUMS and TROLLS so if you think I'm ignoring you this may be the reason.  Best wishes.