Author Topic: Lois Jenkins: The truth I was not allowed to tell  (Read 31105 times)

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Offline Brigadier

Re: Lois Jenkins: The truth I was not allowed to tell
« Reply #30 on: May 03, 2018, 10:27:13 PM »
I found the book very interesting!
Good! Harrowing is the word I would use to describe it. When I finished my copy, I lent it to my mum so that we could discuss the case. She found she had to read it in reverse chapter as a coping mechanism! She found it too traumatic otherwise.

I also find it interesting that that is rare for one of Sion's detractors to have bothered to actually read his account.

Offline mrswah

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Re: Lois Jenkins: The truth I was not allowed to tell
« Reply #31 on: May 04, 2018, 03:38:33 PM »
Good! Harrowing is the word I would use to describe it. When I finished my copy, I lent it to my mum so that we could discuss the case. She found she had to read it in reverse chapter as a coping mechanism! She found it too traumatic otherwise.

I also find it interesting that that is rare for one of Sion's detractors to have bothered to actually read his account.

Really?  i'm surprised. I thought lots of people interested in the case would have read the book!

Richard Camden-Pratt, the prosecution lawyer at Sion's first trial, went to college with my husband!  The latter met him at a reunion some years ago, and Mr Camden-Pratt was convinced that Sion was guilty.

Sion taught at the McEntee school in Walthamstow, London, which is near to where I grew up, so I suppose that fuelled my interest.  it is spelt wrongly in the book!

Offline Brigadier

Re: Lois Jenkins: The truth I was not allowed to tell
« Reply #32 on: May 12, 2018, 11:55:00 PM »
Really?  i'm surprised. I thought lots of people interested in the case would have read the book!

That would be a reasonable assumption wouldn't it!? However, my experience is that those that want to condemn Sion will insist on doing so at any cost. Even if it requires ignoring any facts of the case, basic logic or applying the most basic bit of research effort.

Instead they will call upon the most spurious sources in order to bolster their claim. For example body language analysis of his Trevor McDonald interview 10 years after the event.

My closest association with the case is that I have some cousins that live in Little Common which is a few miles down the coast from Hastings. But as I have no links to the case means I have looked upon the unfolding of events with an un-impassioned viewpoint. if he were guilty of the crime, then so be it. But having looked at the publicly available information, it is quite clear to me that he is not and all attempts to prove otherwise have resulted in a complete disaster for everyone.

Offline IndigoJ

Re: Lois Jenkins: The truth I was not allowed to tell
« Reply #33 on: June 13, 2018, 07:16:48 PM »
I've read the book, the thing that gets me is the time line for that reason i have doubts he did it

its a strange case though if he didn't do it , then who did ? random stranger doesn't ring true to me