Author Topic: Barry George revisited.  (Read 5210 times)

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Offline Nicholas

Re: Barry George revisited.
« Reply #135 on: November 04, 2018, 12:38:59 PM »
I wonder when Jill Dando's murder investigation will be re opened?
« Last Edit: November 04, 2018, 12:43:01 PM by Stephanie »




Offline Nicholas

Re: Barry George revisited.
« Reply #139 on: November 04, 2018, 04:20:05 PM »
"Michelle Diskin was in the front room at her home in Cork listening to the morning radio when she first heard that her brother Barry George had been charged with Jill Dando's murder.
She says she felt numb - completely numb. 'I thought: "No, no, it can't be." 'I wanted to phone my mother, but she is a very quiet and private person. How do you ring your mother and say: "Mum, has my brother been arrested for murder?" she says.

Michelle, a deeply religious woman, finally decided to phone and ask if she should pray for her brother. It seemed a more gentle way of dealing with the appalling news. 'Mother said: "It's all rubbish. He didn't do it. It will die down". I didn't know what to do and said to myself: "Could Barry have done this?"

'Could I see anything in the Barry I knew that might be guilty of this - and I couldn't. I thought about his behaviour. He can be aggravating. But no, not murder.'

But on July 2, last year, Barry George, 42, an educationally-subnormal fantasist with an IQ of just 76, was found guilty of the murder of BBC TV presenter Jill Dando.

She was killed with a single shot to the head. The gun was pressed so hard against her skull that the imprint of the muzzle remained on her scalp afterwards.

There was, however, not one overwhelming piece of evidence to link George to the crime. In the year since the case ended, no other criminal verdict has excited quite so much interest and there has been an endless debate over whether he was indeed guilty 'beyond reasonable doubt'.

Last month, an appeal against his conviction was rejected by three of the country's most senior judges.

Michelle continues to insist upon her brother's innocence. She is determined to take the case to the House of Lords and, should that fail, to Europe, believing his conviction to be a dreadful miscarriage of justice.

In fairness, she doesn't believe her brother to be an angel, but she insists that does not make him a murderer.


Michelle is a warm, articulate woman with a strong sense of right and wrong. Being in the public eye does not sit easily with her. She is, by nature, a home-builder, a wife and mother to three teenage children.

Their terraced family house near Cork is tidy, comfortable and perfumed with scented candles. It is a tactile household where hugs and kisses are easily exchanged.

Her own London childhood had been tough, often violent. In her late teens, she moved to Ireland to work with mentally disabled children. She had little need to dwell upon her past - until her brother's arrest
.

Initially, Michelle believed the courts would clear her brother and she resolved not to speak out on his behalf. Indeed, she didn't want to drag her family into the unholy mess, and, in any case, no direct evidence linked her brother to the crime.

No confession. No apparent motive. No eyewitnesses. No murder weapon was ever found.

There was virtually no scientific evidence, except for minute traces of firearm discharge found in one of George's pockets and described as a 'close match' to particles found in Dando's hair. There was also a risk, acknowledged at the trial, that even this evidence was contaminated.

The prosecution case seemed to be simply that George lived locally and was an oddball with unhealthy obsessions. He was said to be 'fixated' with Princess Diana and to stalk women.

He had been convicted, many years earlier, of attempted rape and impersonating a police officer. He used different names (he was arrested as Barry Bulsara, using the real surname of one of his idols, Freddie Mercury) and lived in a world of fantasy. He was said to be 'obsessed' with guns.

George also happened to be near Dando's Fulham home on the morning of her murder. His own home, a chaotically untidy flat, happened to be just a few streets away. Michelle says: 'Barry was in Belmarsh Prison on remand when I first saw him. I had to see him through a glass screen. It was like being in a confessional box. There was a dark, dingy glass between us and you could hardly hear a thing.

'He looked terribly vulnerable and scared. Almost the first thing he said was: "Shhh, don't talk."

'Then he said: "I have not done what they are saying."

'I was asking questions and he kept telling me to talk to my solicitor. I cried. I think he did too. He said he was sorry that he had put us in this. I couldn't touch him but I wanted him to know he was being supported.

We held up our hands against the glass. I felt utterly overwhelmed that this could be happening to us. At each step along the way I thought it would be stopped. It's unbelievable it wasn't.

'There was no evidence. They just lumped everything up and made out he was one big psycho. Timeframes were forgotten, facts were distorted to make a picture - a very bad picture.

'The police needed somebody, and Barry looked, on the surface, as if he would disappear and nobody would fight for him.

'That's why I have to support him. I have always loved him very much.'

Michelle was the eldest of three children, raised in a cramped highrise flat in White City, West London. The bath was in the kitchen and she shared a bedroom with both her sister, a mentally handicapped epileptic two years her junior, and Barry, the baby of the family.

It was an uneasy household with frequent violent rows. 'Barry and Susan were always very special because I had to look after them when I was small.

'There were a lot of pressures living in such close quarters with people on both sides of you and underneath you. My parents fought all the time so I would take the kids out - sometimes for hours on end.

'It was very difficult. Because Susan had very definite problems that were so big, Barry's were pushed to one side.

'He was a gorgeous baby and, as a boy, was into cars and buildings. He sometimes got into trouble, but he could never seem to understand why.

'He couldn't concentrate for long periods of time and was taken out of school and sent to special school. But his disability didn't become really apparent until he got older.

'Barry has a rigidity of thought. He gets a thought and isn't able to change tack. If you changed the topic of conversation, he wouldn't be able to stop focusing on the first one.'

Michelle was 12 when their parents separated. She says it was a relief, an end to the dreadful rows. Her relationship with her mother was not easy and by the age of 15 she was living with her father.

'My mother was warmer earlier in the marriage,' she says. 'And less warm towards the end of it.'

When Barry asked to move in with his father, he was refused. 'I'm sure Barry saw it as a rejection. Probably the first of many,' she says.

By the age of 18, Michelle was living in Ireland with her grandmother. She kept in contact with her family and her brother visited for a holiday. 'He was 14 and so sweet I didn't want to send him back. I remember he used to hang about this place called Barry's Tea and wanted to work there in the yard but he was too young.

'But he would pester people, so this man sent him home with a letter saying he would take him out as his helper if I said it was OK. He said that he could see Barry needed special attention.

'The man gave Barry some pocket money and he came back with sausages, milk and bread so he could help with his keep.'

Michelle displays a certain pride when she repeats this story. It becomes clear that achievements which most people would take for granted were enormously special when accomplished by Barry.

For example, she tells how he arrived at her wedding 'all by himself' and had 'even hired his own suit so he wouldn't show me up'. She saw him handing out buttonholes to guests and was 'proud'.

By this time, he had started to create fantasies about himself and, intriguingly, she recalls a relative having to steer him away from talking about the SAS.

During their phone calls, Barry would talk of his obsession about being a stuntman. He tried to join the Territorial Army under the name Steve Major.

'It seemed perfectly innocent. He said he'd chosen it because the Six Million Dollar Man had such a name. When he later changed his name to Barry Bulsara, it wasn't something I was happy with. But he said he really loved Freddie Mercury and he was doing it as a tribute.

'He wanted to be a special person. He wanted to have friends. I can only speculate that these inventions were ways of opening a conversation. Let's face it, it's a bit more of a conversation grabber than "I'm classified disabled and I can't do anything".'

The prosecuting lawyers made much of George's fantasies. 'They tried to turn him into the Anti-Christ,' says Michelle. 'They spoke about his so-called obsession with guns after joining the Territorial Army. But the TA realised he had problems and Barry didn't handle guns. The only ones he's had are a starter pistol and a plastic gun that was stolen and broken.

'They said he had an obsession with Diana and stalked and photographed women. It was mentioned that he was discovered by police in Kensington Gardens with a rope and a knife dressed in Army gear. He told me that he was "doing manoeuvres".

'But he was never charged and there are no records of him being in the grounds by Diana's apartment as has been suggested.

'Even being "on manoeuvres" in the park, is not the normal behaviour of a grown person, but still pretty ordinary if you think like a child. He was going through his ex-SAS stage then - and it was almost 20 years ago.

'When police examined his flat they found a pile of 736 newspapers on the floor. Of course, there were some articles about Jill Dando, but there were more about Manchester United, although he's a Fulham supporter.

'There were also never any photos of women pinned up on the wall as has been suggested. The police found rolls of undeveloped film - 2,597 photographs showing 419 women.

'He wasn't using the photographs to satisfy some strange obsession. He was playing a role - that's all to do with the childish part of his life. And he'd just thrown the rolls of film in the corner - as he dropped everything in his flat and forgot about things.

'When Barry was in custody, the police had nothing to charge him with. They knew he'd been convicted of attempted rape in 1983, which he'd owned up to at the time, but he wouldn't admit to Jill Dando's murder.

'They were allowed to keep him for extra time, but still he wouldn't say he was responsible.

'If you know my brother, he's not capable of not caving in under that sort of pressure. But he does know when he's done something wrong and when he hasn't. The next thing that happened was that a particle (of firearm discharge) turned up in a coat - it was the only reason they were able to charge him.

'But the integrity of the coat had been corrupted. It was put in an evidence bag, sealed, carted away from his flat, photographed on a dummy in a police studio with an officer's shirt underneath and put back in the crate before it was examined by forensics.

'And as far as identification is concerned, there was only one person who said she was certain she saw Barry at 7.30am. She said she saw him by a car, but Barry can't drive.

'Barry has been described as a loner. But he's not. He was always out seeing people. He had friends, people who loved him - who accepted Barry with his differences. They didn't know about the attempted rape, but that happened almost 20 years before.

He paid his price to society for what he did and he'd turned his life around. And, despite his disabilities, he had made a life for himself. He discussed his friends and would say: "There's a guy down the road and he's my friend. I wash his car for him." After he was charged, I started piecing things together.

'There was a big, motherly Jamaican woman who lived across the road. When I went to see her, I could see she really loved Barry.

'She was really pleased to see me and said she hadn't known if anyone was going to help him. She was going to get some friends together to stand outside Hammersmith police station with placards saying: "Free Barry Bulsara."

'She's adamant he didn't carry out the crime.'

Michelle gathers strength from such support. She knows her brother, not as a psychopath, but as 'quiet, softly-spoken and wellmannered'.

During medical examinations before his trial, it was discovered that George had suffered severe brain damage from a physical injury while in his 20s. Michelle says he does not know how it occurred, although she conjectures that perhaps it was something to do with his 'Steve Majors' phase.

In the early Eighties, he was registered disabled and suffered increasingly from epileptic fits. If the problem was not properly controlled he would often stumble around.

Michelle is not convinced that he would have had the ability to plan or dexterity to carry out such carefully executed crime and getaway. Indeed, the case confounded police for a year before Barry's arrest.

'I knew right from the beginning, from his whole demeanour that he's innocent. I could tell when I saw him in Belmarsh - through his body language, his eye contact - before and after his conviction.

'He said to me: "They had to have someone. I didn't do this and I don't know why I'm here. But you do realise I am here for the rest of my life?"

'I said he wouldn't be - that the sentence would be reduced and he replied: "Oh no, not for me. I can't ever say I'm sorry for doing it - because I didn't do it."

'At night, things play over and over in my mind. When you realise this is a miscarriage of justice, it becomes enormous. They have grabbed Barry's life and taken it away from him. They have also taken my life.

'It wasn't an easy thing to decide to become vocal. But I have to stand up for Barry's rights. I'm determined to at least do that.'

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-135212/My-brother-didnt-kill-Jill.html#ixzz5DQUKMFv4

https://www.bbc.co.uk/sounds/play/p06pn49r

Is it me or does she sound aggrieved for having not been told during the time she campaigned for her brother that he would not be guaranteed compensation?

'He looked terribly vulnerable and scared. Almost the first thing he said was: "Shhh, don't talk
« Last Edit: November 04, 2018, 04:27:43 PM by Stephanie »

Offline Nicholas

Re: Barry George revisited.
« Reply #140 on: November 04, 2018, 05:59:17 PM »
Michelle Bates writes and I quote,

"Justice is never served by the conviction of the innocent" by Michelle Bates on the 31st Anniversary of the tragedies (Jerrmy Bamber case)

"Becoming aware of a breaking-news story I began to listen in more closely. A siege was taking place at a farmhouse in England. The broadcaster relayed that five people were inside and there was great fear for their safety. As the story unfolded it became apparent that this was an older couple. A farmer and retired Magistrate, Nevill Bamber and his wife, June; their daughter, Sheila, and her six year old twin sons. Jeremy, their son, was outside with police who were trying to communicate with someone inside the house who had been seen pacing back and forth in front of an upstairs window and carrying a firearm. The reporter said that police were reluctant to get too close to the house for fear of causing that person to become more agitated, thereby, escalating the danger to the family. I watched for an hour or so but there was no resolution and, heavily pregnant, I became exhausted and had to go off to bed.
No one was seen pacing back and forth carrying a firearm - this is a lie
Awaking early I was anxious for news
, hopefully of a rescue, so I put the News on immediately. The siege was over, police had stormed the house and five bodies had been found inside. I was heartbroken, a whole family! My heart went out to the young man who had waited all night long with the police for news of his family; this was not what he wanted to hear.
There was no live TV coverage during the time Bamber was outside the farmhouse with the police - another lie 
My own child was born a few days later and I became engrossed in motherhood. It was a real shock to hear, sometime later, that the son, Jeremy Bamber, had been arrested for the killings…how was that possible when he was outside during the siege and everyone knew that? I presumed the police knew something we did not; there must have been strong evidence to convict a man of killing his entire family…I pushed my unease aside and got on with motherhood and my own life.

Since then I have revisited the facts of this case in light of so many high-profile miscarriage of justice cases coming to light, including that of my own brother, Barry George, for the murder of Jill Dando. More recently we’ve heard of the lies and cover-ups in the Hillsborough deaths and The Chilcot report exposing the same type of cover ups in the Iraqi war scandal. In the Bamber case I can find no evidence to convince me of the guilt of this man. Nothing that can account for a man languishing in jail for more than thirty years. How did a jury convict a young man without proof?

Our justice system is predicated on the ‘presumption of innocence’ and also on ‘beyond reasonable doubt,’ but there is so much doubt surrounding this conviction that this case must be looked into again, urgently. The CCRC and the Court of Appeal seem to be reluctant to do this, and the police, for their part, have been withholding evidence from the defendant. It will cost thousands of pounds to, again, take them to court to force them to hand over the papers and forensic results that the court has already told them they must do. They have also effectively ‘locked down’ documents in the case under a PII* order; what is there to hide? Meanwhile, a man is fighting a conviction for multiple murders that there is no proof he committed. Surely this is not the justice system his father, a Magistrate was proud to be a part of? https://jeremybamber.blogspot.co.uk/2016/08/justice-is-never-served-by-conviction.html

Barry George had his conviction quashed. He's not been paid awarded compensation because he's not innocent enough. A judge concluded a jury properly directed may have come to a different conclusion; words to that effect

Michelle Bates is claiming Jeremy Bamber is innocent, she says the same about her brother?

Mark Williams Thomas was involved in both the Bamber and George cases, one via a TV documentary the other a newspaper series.

Who should we believe? I do not believe Michelle Bates!

Furthermore, Michael Mansfield QC was misled in relation to the Simon Hall case. He could have been misled in relation to Barry George. Personality disordered individuals can be extremely convincing.

Mrs Bates further claims in the Bamber case:  "Dead people don’t walk (and two only became one at marriage!). Sheila alive, even when police stormed the building. Tragic murder/suicide. 😢 https://mobile.twitter.com/Michelle_Diskin/status/917077719749361664

https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=_i2CjYDJGTo#fauxfullscreen

Offline Nicholas

Re: Barry George revisited.
« Reply #141 on: November 04, 2018, 10:23:19 PM »
"Michelle Diskin was in the front room at her home in Cork listening to the morning radio when she first heard that her brother Barry George had been charged with Jill Dando's murder.
She says she felt numb - completely numb. 'I thought: "No, no, it can't be." 'I wanted to phone my mother, but she is a very quiet and private person. How do you ring your mother and say: "Mum, has my brother been arrested for murder?" she says.

Michelle, a deeply religious woman, finally decided to phone and ask if she should pray for her brother. It seemed a more gentle way of dealing with the appalling news. 'Mother said: "It's all rubbish. He didn't do it. It will die down". I didn't know what to do and said to myself: "Could Barry have done this?"

'Could I see anything in the Barry I knew that might be guilty of this - and I couldn't. I thought about his behaviour. He can be aggravating. But no, not murder.'

But on July 2, last year, Barry George, 42, an educationally-subnormal fantasist with an IQ of just 76, was found guilty of the murder of BBC TV presenter Jill Dando.

She was killed with a single shot to the head. The gun was pressed so hard against her skull that the imprint of the muzzle remained on her scalp afterwards.

There was, however, not one overwhelming piece of evidence to link George to the crime. In the year since the case ended, no other criminal verdict has excited quite so much interest and there has been an endless debate over whether he was indeed guilty 'beyond reasonable doubt'.

Last month, an appeal against his conviction was rejected by three of the country's most senior judges.

Michelle continues to insist upon her brother's innocence. She is determined to take the case to the House of Lords and, should that fail, to Europe, believing his conviction to be a dreadful miscarriage of justice.

In fairness, she doesn't believe her brother to be an angel, but she insists that does not make him a murderer.


Michelle is a warm, articulate woman with a strong sense of right and wrong. Being in the public eye does not sit easily with her. She is, by nature, a home-builder, a wife and mother to three teenage children.

Their terraced family house near Cork is tidy, comfortable and perfumed with scented candles. It is a tactile household where hugs and kisses are easily exchanged.

Her own London childhood had been tough, often violent. In her late teens, she moved to Ireland to work with mentally disabled children. She had little need to dwell upon her past - until her brother's arrest
.

Initially, Michelle believed the courts would clear her brother and she resolved not to speak out on his behalf. Indeed, she didn't want to drag her family into the unholy mess, and, in any case, no direct evidence linked her brother to the crime.

No confession. No apparent motive. No eyewitnesses. No murder weapon was ever found.

There was virtually no scientific evidence, except for minute traces of firearm discharge found in one of George's pockets and described as a 'close match' to particles found in Dando's hair. There was also a risk, acknowledged at the trial, that even this evidence was contaminated.

The prosecution case seemed to be simply that George lived locally and was an oddball with unhealthy obsessions. He was said to be 'fixated' with Princess Diana and to stalk women.

He had been convicted, many years earlier, of attempted rape and impersonating a police officer. He used different names (he was arrested as Barry Bulsara, using the real surname of one of his idols, Freddie Mercury) and lived in a world of fantasy. He was said to be 'obsessed' with guns.

George also happened to be near Dando's Fulham home on the morning of her murder. His own home, a chaotically untidy flat, happened to be just a few streets away. Michelle says: 'Barry was in Belmarsh Prison on remand when I first saw him. I had to see him through a glass screen. It was like being in a confessional box. There was a dark, dingy glass between us and you could hardly hear a thing.

'He looked terribly vulnerable and scared. Almost the first thing he said was: "Shhh, don't talk."

'Then he said: "I have not done what they are saying."

'I was asking questions and he kept telling me to talk to my solicitor. I cried. I think he did too. He said he was sorry that he had put us in this. I couldn't touch him but I wanted him to know he was being supported.

We held up our hands against the glass. I felt utterly overwhelmed that this could be happening to us. At each step along the way I thought it would be stopped. It's unbelievable it wasn't.

'There was no evidence. They just lumped everything up and made out he was one big psycho. Timeframes were forgotten, facts were distorted to make a picture - a very bad picture.

'The police needed somebody, and Barry looked, on the surface, as if he would disappear and nobody would fight for him.

'That's why I have to support him. I have always loved him very much.'

Michelle was the eldest of three children, raised in a cramped highrise flat in White City, West London. The bath was in the kitchen and she shared a bedroom with both her sister, a mentally handicapped epileptic two years her junior, and Barry, the baby of the family.

It was an uneasy household with frequent violent rows. 'Barry and Susan were always very special because I had to look after them when I was small.

'There were a lot of pressures living in such close quarters with people on both sides of you and underneath you. My parents fought all the time so I would take the kids out - sometimes for hours on end.

'It was very difficult. Because Susan had very definite problems that were so big, Barry's were pushed to one side.

'He was a gorgeous baby and, as a boy, was into cars and buildings. He sometimes got into trouble, but he could never seem to understand why.

'He couldn't concentrate for long periods of time and was taken out of school and sent to special school. But his disability didn't become really apparent until he got older.

'Barry has a rigidity of thought. He gets a thought and isn't able to change tack. If you changed the topic of conversation, he wouldn't be able to stop focusing on the first one.'

Michelle was 12 when their parents separated. She says it was a relief, an end to the dreadful rows. Her relationship with her mother was not easy and by the age of 15 she was living with her father.

'My mother was warmer earlier in the marriage,' she says. 'And less warm towards the end of it.'

When Barry asked to move in with his father, he was refused. 'I'm sure Barry saw it as a rejection. Probably the first of many,' she says.

By the age of 18, Michelle was living in Ireland with her grandmother. She kept in contact with her family and her brother visited for a holiday. 'He was 14 and so sweet I didn't want to send him back. I remember he used to hang about this place called Barry's Tea and wanted to work there in the yard but he was too young.

'But he would pester people, so this man sent him home with a letter saying he would take him out as his helper if I said it was OK. He said that he could see Barry needed special attention.

'The man gave Barry some pocket money and he came back with sausages, milk and bread so he could help with his keep.'

Michelle displays a certain pride when she repeats this story. It becomes clear that achievements which most people would take for granted were enormously special when accomplished by Barry.

For example, she tells how he arrived at her wedding 'all by himself' and had 'even hired his own suit so he wouldn't show me up'. She saw him handing out buttonholes to guests and was 'proud'.

By this time, he had started to create fantasies about himself and, intriguingly, she recalls a relative having to steer him away from talking about the SAS.

During their phone calls, Barry would talk of his obsession about being a stuntman. He tried to join the Territorial Army under the name Steve Major.

'It seemed perfectly innocent. He said he'd chosen it because the Six Million Dollar Man had such a name. When he later changed his name to Barry Bulsara, it wasn't something I was happy with. But he said he really loved Freddie Mercury and he was doing it as a tribute.

'He wanted to be a special person. He wanted to have friends. I can only speculate that these inventions were ways of opening a conversation. Let's face it, it's a bit more of a conversation grabber than "I'm classified disabled and I can't do anything".'

The prosecuting lawyers made much of George's fantasies. 'They tried to turn him into the Anti-Christ,' says Michelle. 'They spoke about his so-called obsession with guns after joining the Territorial Army. But the TA realised he had problems and Barry didn't handle guns. The only ones he's had are a starter pistol and a plastic gun that was stolen and broken.

'They said he had an obsession with Diana and stalked and photographed women. It was mentioned that he was discovered by police in Kensington Gardens with a rope and a knife dressed in Army gear. He told me that he was "doing manoeuvres".

'But he was never charged and there are no records of him being in the grounds by Diana's apartment as has been suggested.

'Even being "on manoeuvres" in the park, is not the normal behaviour of a grown person, but still pretty ordinary if you think like a child. He was going through his ex-SAS stage then - and it was almost 20 years ago.

'When police examined his flat they found a pile of 736 newspapers on the floor. Of course, there were some articles about Jill Dando, but there were more about Manchester United, although he's a Fulham supporter.

'There were also never any photos of women pinned up on the wall as has been suggested. The police found rolls of undeveloped film - 2,597 photographs showing 419 women.

'He wasn't using the photographs to satisfy some strange obsession. He was playing a role - that's all to do with the childish part of his life. And he'd just thrown the rolls of film in the corner - as he dropped everything in his flat and forgot about things.

'When Barry was in custody, the police had nothing to charge him with. They knew he'd been convicted of attempted rape in 1983, which he'd owned up to at the time, but he wouldn't admit to Jill Dando's murder.

'They were allowed to keep him for extra time, but still he wouldn't say he was responsible.

'If you know my brother, he's not capable of not caving in under that sort of pressure. But he does know when he's done something wrong and when he hasn't. The next thing that happened was that a particle (of firearm discharge) turned up in a coat - it was the only reason they were able to charge him.

'But the integrity of the coat had been corrupted. It was put in an evidence bag, sealed, carted away from his flat, photographed on a dummy in a police studio with an officer's shirt underneath and put back in the crate before it was examined by forensics.

'And as far as identification is concerned, there was only one person who said she was certain she saw Barry at 7.30am. She said she saw him by a car, but Barry can't drive.

'Barry has been described as a loner. But he's not. He was always out seeing people. He had friends, people who loved him - who accepted Barry with his differences. They didn't know about the attempted rape, but that happened almost 20 years before.

He paid his price to society for what he did and he'd turned his life around. And, despite his disabilities, he had made a life for himself. He discussed his friends and would say: "There's a guy down the road and he's my friend. I wash his car for him." After he was charged, I started piecing things together.

'There was a big, motherly Jamaican woman who lived across the road. When I went to see her, I could see she really loved Barry.

'She was really pleased to see me and said she hadn't known if anyone was going to help him. She was going to get some friends together to stand outside Hammersmith police station with placards saying: "Free Barry Bulsara."

'She's adamant he didn't carry out the crime.'

Michelle gathers strength from such support. She knows her brother, not as a psychopath, but as 'quiet, softly-spoken and wellmannered'.

During medical examinations before his trial, it was discovered that George had suffered severe brain damage from a physical injury while in his 20s. Michelle says he does not know how it occurred, although she conjectures that perhaps it was something to do with his 'Steve Majors' phase.

In the early Eighties, he was registered disabled and suffered increasingly from epileptic fits. If the problem was not properly controlled he would often stumble around.

Michelle is not convinced that he would have had the ability to plan or dexterity to carry out such carefully executed crime and getaway. Indeed, the case confounded police for a year before Barry's arrest.

'I knew right from the beginning, from his whole demeanour that he's innocent. I could tell when I saw him in Belmarsh - through his body language, his eye contact - before and after his conviction.

'He said to me: "They had to have someone. I didn't do this and I don't know why I'm here. But you do realise I am here for the rest of my life?"

'I said he wouldn't be - that the sentence would be reduced and he replied: "Oh no, not for me. I can't ever say I'm sorry for doing it - because I didn't do it."

'At night, things play over and over in my mind. When you realise this is a miscarriage of justice, it becomes enormous. They have grabbed Barry's life and taken it away from him. They have also taken my life.

'It wasn't an easy thing to decide to become vocal. But I have to stand up for Barry's rights. I'm determined to at least do that.'

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-135212/My-brother-didnt-kill-Jill.html#ixzz5DQUKMFv4

And no mention of Barry George bouncing to tell his sister about the baptist church in Fulham?


Offline Nicholas

Re: Barry George revisited.
« Reply #143 on: December 03, 2018, 07:05:31 PM »
"His high profile since Downing was released on bail last February has brought him around 500 letters from others claiming to be victims of injustice. He has been asked to help with the case of Barry George, jailed for murdering Jill Dando. "I've been given names about who did the Dando murder, and it's not the man they have," he says. "I reckon I could get him off quite easily. You see, barristers are not investigative journalists. They'll go through the proper channels - but the people who give you the golden information are not the Rotary Club members, they're in the underworld, and these people feel an injustice has been done. Michael Mansfield (the human rights QC) won't find out who did it by cycling up and down on his bike in London."

https://www.standard.co.uk/news/police-say-next-week-will-be-dangerous-6304394.html


"The Simon Cowell tag had amused me; it was real wannabe stuff. A dead man was mixing past and present like the Ghost of Popstars past. I was intrigued to find that exactly the same analogy had been made by the dead Terry Thornton in 2014! The dead man has given other interviews!

ROCK legend Joe Cocker became a sixties superstar after taking advice from the SPIRIT WORLD during a spooky Ouija session, his former Midland manager reveals today. Pop entrepreneur Terry Thornton, who lives in Bakewell, Derbyshire - first met the young Cocker when he was setting up a nightclub in the gravel-voiced singer's Sheffield hometown. "He was a quiet young lad who was starting to make a name for himself in pubs and working men's clubs," recalls Thornton, who has been dubbed the Simon Cowell of the 1960s.

It seems Terry has been giving interviews from the grave for quite some time! Unlike my Savile piece from 2015, this piece from 2014 had a reporters credit

In truth Don Hale being behind this deceit came as no surprise since all of this ghost-hunting had really got started because I had happened across the book authored by Don Hale, in which Don himself had explained that Terry had died in 2010. Quite how Don explains the interviews he’s been having with Terry since then, I have no idea. However it does go some way to expose the state British journalism is in, in the 21st Century. It turns out that Don Hale is the new David Icke. He is a thwarted pro-footballer… And just like David Icke, Don began his journalist career with the BBC after injury cut short his soccer days!! Incredible coincidences!

2003:
It was always my ambition to become either a reporter or a pro soccer player and just before I left school, I was offered a professional contract to become an apprentice player with Bury FC. I played for about six years for Bury, Blackburn Rovers and many other clubs but became injured and used to sit in the stands and watch the team play. That was very boring until I became friendly with the BBC radio commentator who sat next to me… I was then asked to join the BBC…
http://www.mysteryone.com/interview.php?ID=651

Later on in the interview we find Terry. It’s in response to a question about Don’s book about Joe Cocker.

I got his ex manager out of jail about three years ago. He was a guy called Terry Thornton. Another of my famous miscarriage cases. I didn't know he was into rock at the time but as some reward for my work he let me write about his involvement with Cocker and other pop/rock stars such as The New Faces, Rod Stewart, Cream, Eric Capton, and a host of others. I have the book and can send it to you if you like?
 
So, there we have the connection. A famous “miscarriage” case? I googled in vain to discover what this case might be. There didn’t seem all that much on the internet but I did work out that Terry Thornton had been sent to prison for life for the attempted murder of a woman named Eileen Caulton. Once I had her name, the story began to fall into my lap. A 5lb Nail Bomb was delivered as a parcel to Eileen in August 1989. It blew off her left arm and the one-inch nails smashed into her entire body… She spent two weeks in Intensive Care; both of her legs were broken – the bomb seared 30% of her skin off. Her sight and hearing were permanently damaged too. I eventually found that the case had been famous enough back in the 1990’s to make one of those part-works advertised on TV sometimes. This series was called Real Crimes. A build-your-own magazine was published by Midsummer Books Ltd in 1993

http://jimcannotfixthis.blogspot.com/2015/04/a-victim-law-ghost-writer.html


http://barthsnotes.com/2017/09/10/edward-heath-sex-abuse-allegations-media-circus-continues/


"Another story about Leon Brittan and a dossier comes from Don Hale, who by his own account is himself part of the wider story. Hale used to be editor of the Bury Messenger, and last summer he claimed (or, as some hacks prefer, “revealed”) that he had been given “an incendiary dossier… by long-serving Labour politician Barbara Castle
http://barthsnotes.com/2015/02/01/some-notes-on-leon-brittan-geoffrey-dickens-and-the-media/



"Now, the third question: did Barry George do it? Yes, I think so, but then perhaps you think I would. People close to the victims of a crime might be expected to latch on to any suspect to get some sort of closure. Actually, the opposite is true.

It matters far more to me that they have the right man than it does to almost anyone who reads this; it would be appalling if Jill's killer were still on the loose. But I was convinced it was Barry George long before I heard his name. From day one I said that whoever did it was suffering from a personality disorder. The conspiracy theories (everything from Mafia hitmen to Serb gunmen) were so dismally incoherent as to be laughable. All my years of experience on Crimewatch taught me that if it wasn't Barry George it would be someone very much like him.

One thing is for sure. The defence is always more vociferous at this stage than the prosecution. The police and the CPS have to bite their tongues and Jill's family is far too dignified to get involved. The result is a one-sided presentation of the "facts" and, in the past few days, I have heard wild allegations that the police "fitted up the local village idiot", which is deeply prejudiced, ill-informed and insulting to all concerned
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https://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/features/3633091/Past-it-Its-hardly-a-fair-cop....html
« Last Edit: December 03, 2018, 08:39:58 PM by Nicholas »